Catalogue


This seat of Mars : war and the British Isles, 1485-1746 /
Charles Carlton.
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2011.
description
xxii, 332 p., [16] p. of plates
ISBN
0300139136 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780300139136 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New Haven : Yale University Press, c2011.
isbn
0300139136 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780300139136 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8178703
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2011-12-01:
Early modern Britain was a violent place. Warfare had been prevalent throughout the medieval period, and the later centuries were no different. Carlton (history, emeritus, North Carolina State Univ.; Going to the Wars: The Experience of the British Civil Wars, 1638-1651) estimates that over 1.2 million people from the British Isles died as a result of near-constant war. He provides both chronological and thematic chapters, describing military events and then discussing issues and trends, such as enlisting, campaigning, and siege warfare. The period covered represents a shift in British warfare. From 1485 to 1688, British wars were directed inward, suppressing rebellions and pacifying the Scots and Irish. Then, starting with William III, England saw renewed war with France. Carlton's overall theme is that war, which was often then directly tied to issues of religion, affected everyone in early modern Britain. VERDICT This is a solid narrative that should be useful to anyone interested in military history or early modern Britain's place in European history.-Matthew J. Wayman, Penn State Schuylkill Lib., Schuylkill Haven (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2012-05-01:
There are multiple points of view that a scholar can choose when writing about warfare, and Carlton (emer., North Carolina State Univ.) takes on virtually all of them to depict the various impacts of nearly continuous warfare on the people of the British Isles from the time of Bosworth Field to Culloden. He includes wars confined to the isles as well as wars with the Spanish, French, and Dutch. The author weaves together a political/military and naval narrative with personal accounts and experiences, even including discussions of what happens on the battlefield when the battle is over. Weaponry, tactics, strategy, training, field surgery, campaign conditions, expenditures, effects on civilians, recruitment, and conscription--Carlton ranges from the broad view to the personal and examines nearly every aspect of British warfare during this period, but he never becomes so bogged down in the details as to lose the reader. Very readable, packed with details and abundant endnotes, this is a fine addition to British military and naval history. This reviewer's only quibble is the lack of a bibliography; perhaps it was thought that the endnotes would make one redundant. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Most levels/libraries. D. M. Hall Lake Erie College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Carlton ranges from the broad view to the personal and examines nearly every aspect of British warfare during this period, but he never becomes so bogged down in the details as to lose the reader. Very readable, packed with details and abundant endnotes, this is a fine addition to British military and naval history."D.M. Hall, Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, December 2011
Choice, May 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Shakespeare was not exaggerating when he defined being a soldier as one of the seven ages of man. Over the early modern period, many millions of young men from the four corners of the present United Kingdom went to war, oftenand most bloodilyagainst each other. The almost continuous fighting on land and sea for the two and one-half centuries between Bosworth and Culloden decimated lives, but created the British state and forged the nation as the world's predominant power. In this innovative and moving book, Charles Carlton explores the glorious and terrible impact of war at the national and individual levels. Chapters alternate, providing a robust military and political narrative interlaced with accounts illuminating the personal experience of war, from recruitment to the end of battle in discharge or death. Carlton expertly charts the remarkable military developments over the period, as well as war's enduring corollariescamaraderie, courage, fear, and griefto give a powerful account of the profound effect of war on the British Isles and its peoples.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, Charles Carlton explores the glorious and terrible impact of war at the national and individual levels. Chapters alternate, providing a robust military and political narrative interlaced with accounts illuminating the personal experience of war, from recruitment to the end of battle in discharge or death.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xii
Introduction: This Seat of Marsp. xv
Early Tudor Warfare, 1485-1558p. 1
Give Me Spirit: Joining and Trainingp. 20
This Happy Breed of Men: Elizabethan Warfare, 1558-1603p. 36
Why Men Foughtp. 63
Those Were Golden Days: Early Stuart Warfare, 1603-1639p. 97
Low Intensity Combat: Campaigningp. 96
All DiseasÆd: Civil Wars and Commonwealth: Events, 1638-1660p. 111
Talk You of Killing: Civil Wars and Commonwealth: Impact, 1638-1660p. 144
High Intensity Combat: Battles and Siegesp. 162
Restoration to Glorious Revolution, 1660-1688p. 179
The Peril of the Waters: War at Seap. 199
Let Slip the Dogs of War: After the Glorious Revolution: 1688-1746p. 215
The HurlyburlyÆs Done: The Aftermath of Combatp. 237
Conclusion: The Hand of Warp. 258
Notesp. 266
Indexp. 308
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem