Catalogue

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Elite women and polite society in eighteenth-century Scotland /
Katharine Glover.
imprint
Woodbridge : Boydell Press, 2011.
description
ix, 217 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1843836815 (hbk.), 9781843836810 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge : Boydell Press, 2011.
isbn
1843836815 (hbk.)
9781843836810 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8177114
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 183-204) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Katharine Glover has taught history at the University of St Andrews and at the University of Edinburgh, where she held a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-03-01:
Historian Glover (PhD, Edinburgh Univ.) analyzes the formulation of the ideal of elite femininity in 18th-century Scotland. Using a number of archival sources, she looks into the unique upbringing, education, and activities that shaped the lives and worldviews of these women. More than just reading elite femininity as a simple product of various institutional forces, however, Glover also focuses on the ways in which individual women used polite practices and social spaces to consolidate a sense of personal identity. Far from mere entertainment, she argues, the plays, assemblies, and promenades that the women of polite society so enjoyed "created new opportunities" for them to "engage with the world outside their immediate social circles"--a luxury their foremothers would not have known and that held, as Glover writes, "far-reaching repercussions for both individuals and Scottish society more broadly." For those interested in the history of gender identities or modern Scottish history in general, this work will be a worthy addition to their bookshelves. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. L. Hoglund SUNY at Stony Brook
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2012
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using a variety of sources, this book investigates the ways in which polite social practices and expectations influenced the experience of elite femininity in Scotland in the 18th century.
Main Description
Fashionable 'polite' society at this time emphasised mixed-gender sociability and encouraged the visible participation of elite women in a series of urban, often public settings. Using a variety of sources (both men's and women's correspondence, accounts, bills, memoirs and other family papers), this book investigates the ways in which polite social practices and expectations influenced the experience of elite femininity in Scotland in the eighteenth century. It explores women's education and upbringing; their reading practices; the meanings of the social spaces and activities in which they engaged and how this fed over into the realm of politics; and the fashion for tourism at home and abroad. It also asks how elite women used polite social spaces and practices to extend their mental horizons and to form a sense of belonging to a public at a time when Scotland was among the most intellectually vibrant societies in Europe.
Main Description
Fashionable "polite" society of this period emphasised mixed-gender sociability and encouraged the visible participation of elite women in a series of urban, often public settings. Using a variety of sources (both men's and women's correspondence, accounts, bills, memoirs and other family papers), this book investigates the ways in which polite social practices and expectations influenced the experience of elite femininity in Scotland in the eighteenth century. It explores women's education and upbringing; their reading practices; the meanings of the social spaces and activities in which they engaged and how this fed over into the realm of politics; and the fashion for tourism at home and abroad. It also asks how elite women used polite social spaces and practices to extend their mental horizons and to form a sense of belonging to a public at a time when Scotland was among the most intellectually vibrant societies in Europe.
Unpaid Annotation
Women are shown to have played an important and very visible role in society at the time.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Prefacep. 1
Elite Women and Eighteenth-Century Scottish Societyp. 3
Education and Upbringingp. 24
Reading and Print Culturep. 50
Polite Sociability: Space and Social Practicesp. 79
Politics and Influencep. 110
Travel, Tourism and Placep. 139
Conclusionp. 166
Appendix: Biographical Backgroundsp. 173
Bibliographyp. 183
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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