Catalogue


Sex, honor and citizenship in early Third Republic France /
Andrea Mansker.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
ix, 310 p.
ISBN
0230294030 (hbk.), 9780230294035 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230294030 (hbk.)
9780230294035 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8174552
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 287-300) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Andrea Mansker is Associate Professor of History at Sewanee: The University of the South, USA. She recently contributed to the volume edited by Christopher E. Forth and Elinor Accampo, Confronting Modernity in Fin-de-Sicle France: Bodies, Minds and[Gender (2010).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
By examining women's appropriation of the honor code in France on the eve of WW I, Mansker (Sewanee: The Univ. of the South) argues that the "widely accepted contention that ... modern western feminisms stemmed solely from the gendered paradoxes of the French Revolution" is no longer valid. Because it relies too heavily on a few central characters and fails to acknowledge other important influences on honor, such as nationalism, the argument often falls short of its claims. Actions and words, while admittedly colorful, did not necessarily pose as dramatic a challenge to the prevailing social and cultural climate in Third Republic France as Mansker asserts. Arria Ly, an outspoken feminist activist, did not escape her sex in spite of her public challenge for a duel; central to her radical demands for equality was celibacy for single French women instead of full sexual equality. Mansker's examination of turn-of-the-century French feminist tactics, which included shame and moral superiority to press for equality, should have been situated in the lively international discourse among Western feminists, as these were not unique to France. Summing Up: Optional. Faculty. J. M. Morris College of Mount St. Joseph
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2012
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A repositioning of French women's struggle for suffrage within the distinct cultural landscape of the masculine honour system
Long Description
This book repositions French women's struggle for suffrage within the distinct cultural landscape of the masculine honor system, a system that celebrated male dueling and dictated the proper social and sexual forms of men's comportment prior to the First World War. Whether activists demanded admission to the ritual of the duel or publicly shamed men for their extramarital sexual behavior, they appropriated extralegal honor codes to enact new models of civic participation and to refashion the private politics of the republican family. The book uses unexplored feminist sources, divorce records, parliamentary debates on the name, and evidence of a female "surplus" in France to reorient a body of scholarship that has been limited to masculinity studies. Demonstrating how suffragists deployed an inequitable, prerevolutionary code to construct democratic identities for women, it suggests that modern western feminisms did not derive solely from the French Revolution.
Main Description
A repositioning of French women's struggle for suffrage within the distinct cultural landscape of the masculine honor system. Whether activists demanded admission to the popular ritual of the duel or publicly shamed men for their extramarital sexual behavior, they appropriated extralegal honor codes to enact new civic and familial identities.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. viii
Introductionp. 1
"Mademoiselle Arria Ly Wants Blood!" The New Woman and the Debate over Female Honorp. 19
The Sexual Insult: Medicalized Views of Singleness during the Long Nineteenth Centuryp. 57
Rethinking Honor in the Republican Family: Fin-de-Si├Ęcle Divorce Suitsp. 89
The Honor of a Name: Marital Status, Property, and the Patronymicp. 127
The Feminist Politics of the Female Surplus: Constructing Citizenship through Singlenessp. 163
Sexual Citizenship and the Political Culture of Shame in the Women's Movementp. 193
Conclusion: Giving the Liep. 234
Notesp. 250
Selected Bibliographyp. 287
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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