Catalogue


Gender, sexuality, and syphilis in early modern Venice [electronic resource] : the disease that came to stay /
Laura J. McGough.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, c2011.
description
x, 202 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780230252929 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire [England] ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, c2011.
isbn
9780230252929 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
A network of lovers: sexuality and disease patterns in early modern Venice -- The suspected culprits: dangerously beautiful prostitutes and debauched men -- Stigma reinforced: the problem of incurable cases of a curable disease -- Gender and institutions: hospitals and female asylums.
catalogue key
8159425
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-198) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Laura J. McGough is Lecturer in the School of Public Health, University of Ghana. She undertook postdoctoral training in sexually transmitted diseases at Johns Hopkins University after completing her PhD at Northwestern University in History, and has worked as a consultant for HIV/AIDS projects for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), WHO, and other organizations.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This provocative book questions the assumption that syphilis became widespread in Venice because of its legendary courtesans. Using new evidence, Laura McGough reconstructs the city's sexual networks, revealing a society where sexual relations linked people of different classes, neighborhoods and occupations.
Long Description
This provocative book questions the assumption that syphilis (the 'French disease') became widespread in Venice because of its legendary courtesans. Using new evidence, Laura McGough reconstructs the city's sexual networks, revealing a society where sexual relations linked people of different classes, neighbourhoods and occupations. Venice's restrictive marriage customs, its role as a centre of migration, and fears of male sexual impotence brought about a sexual culture that fostered the spread of disease. To prevent the spread of disease, Venetian authorities focused on a single target: beautiful young women and girls, who were encouraged to enter walled asylums to protect their chastity. Both medical authorities and the public believed this 'routine disease' could be treated and cured: only cases that did not respond to treatment aroused suspicions that the illness was caused by witchcraft. Gender, Sexuality and Syphilis in Early Modern Venice thereby explores the medical, social, and cultural transitions that occur as a disease comes to be regarded as routine and widespread.
Main Description
A unique study of how syphilis, better known as the French disease in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, became so widespread and embedded in the society, culture and institutions of early modern Venice due to the pattern of sexual relations that developed from restrictive marital customs, widespread migration and male privilege.
Long Description
This provocative book questions the assumption that syphilis (the 'French disease') became widespread in Venice because of its legendary courtesans. Using new evidence, Laura McGough reconstructs the city's sexual networks, revealing a society where sexual relations linked people of different classes, neighborhoods and occupations. Venice's restrictive marriage customs, its role as a center of migration, and fears of male sexual impotence brought about a sexual culture that fostered the spread of disease. To prevent the spread of disease, Venetian authorities focused on a single target: beautiful young women and girls, who were encouraged to enter walled asylums to protect their chastity. Both medical authorities and the public believed the disease could be treated and cured: as a 'routine disease,' only cases that did not respond to treatment aroused suspicions that the disease was caused by witchcraft.  Gender, Sexuality and Syphilis in Early Modern Venice thereby explores the medical, social, and cultural transitions that occur as a disease comes to be regarded as routine and widespread.
Description for Bookstore
A new interpretation of why syphilis became so common and enduring in Venice, a city known for its beautiful courtesans, approached from a social and cultural history perspective
Description for Bookstore
A new interpretation of why syphilis became so common and enduring in Venice, a city known for its beautiful courtesans, approached from a social and cultural history perspective
Long Description
This provocative book questions the assumption that syphilis (the 'œFrench disease') became widespread in Venice because of its legendary courtesans. Using new evidence, Laura McGough reconstructs the city's sexual networks, revealing a society where sexual relations linked people of different classes, neighborhoods and occupations. Venice's restrictive marriage customs, its role as a center of migration, and fears of male sexual impotence brought about a sexual culture that fostered the spread of disease. To prevent the spread of disease, Venetian authorities focused on a single target: beautiful young women and girls, who were encouraged to enter walled asylums to protect their chastity. Both medical authorities and the public believed the disease could be treated and cured: as a 'œroutine disease,' only cases that did not respond to treatment aroused suspicions that the disease was caused by witchcraft. Gender, Sexuality and Syphilis in Early Modern Venice thereby explores the medical, social, and cultural transitions that occur as a disease comes to be regarded as routine and widespread.
Table of Contents
List of Figures, Tables, and Chartsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
A Network of Lovers: Sexuality and Disease Patterns in Early Modern Venicep. 17
The Suspected Culprits: Dangerously Beautiful Prostitutes and Debauched Menp. 45
Stigma Reinforced: The Problem of Incurable Cases of a Curable Diseasep. 71
Gender and Institutions: Hospitals and Female Asylumsp. 102
Conclusionp. 136
Afterwordp. 144
Notesp. 153
Bibliographyp. 182
Indexp. 199
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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