Catalogue

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Women's poetry and religion in Victorian England [electronic resource] : Jewish identity and Christian culture /
Cynthia Scheinberg.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
xi, 275 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521811120
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
0521811120
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8158569
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 256-271) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-05-01:
One of the most important recent trends in 19th-century studies has been the rescue of religion from the academic discard bin. Scheinberg (Mills College) joins in with this welcome contribution. In her opening chapter, Scheinberg argues that the 19th century defined poetry as an explicitly Christian and masculine vocation. Haunting this vocation, however, was the figure of the Jewish (and female) "other," particularly given the status accorded to the Old Testament as a quintessentially poetic work. Scheinberg claims that women religious poets negotiated their own authority by engaging with Old Testament prophetic and poetic figures, whether to reaffirm their own Christianity (Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti) or to negotiate a space for Jewish poets (Grace Aguilar and Amy Levy). The readings are mostly sensitive and provocative, although this reader balked at Scheinberg's interpretation of "Goblin Market" as an antisemitic poem. And the quotations of Aguilar's work inadvertently demonstrate why this thoroughly mundane poet has not been more regularly anthologized. Nevertheless, this is an important study, sure to engage anyone interested in women poets, devotional writing, or Christian-Jewish relations in the 19th century. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. E. Burstein SUNY College at Brockport
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a scholarly but readable book on four women poets of Victorian England, two Jewish and two Christian." Mills Quarterly
"[Scheinberg's] book will enrich the study of Victorian poetry, Anglo-Jewish literature, and women's religious identity." Victorian Studies
"[T]his is an important study, sure to engage anyone interested in women poets, devotional writing, or Christian-Jewish relations in the 19th century. Recommended." Choice
"This timely book offers refreshing new angles with which to explore women's poetry in the Victorian period, and it will be of great use to future scholars and students working on this field." Victorian Institute Journal
"What Scheinberg offers in this committed feminist study is an admixture of exegesis, interpretation, and literary criticism... Scheinberg illustrates and exemplifies in detailed fashion the creativity and complexity of the four poets' theology and poetry." Nineteenth Century Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2003
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Scheinberg examines Anglo-Jewish (Grace Aguilar and Amy Levy) and Christian (Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti) women poets, and argues that there are important connections between the discourses of nineteenth-century poetry, gender and religious identity.
Description for Bookstore
Victorian women poets lived in a time when religion was a vital aspect of their identities. Cynthia Scheinberg examines Anglo-Jewish (Grace Aguilar and Amy Levy) and Christian (Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti) women poets, and argues that there are important connections between the discourses of nineteenth-century poetry, gender and religious identity. Broadly interdisciplinary, the book's methodology calls on studies in poetics, religious studies, feminist literary criticism, and little read Anglo-Jewish primary sources.
Main Description
Victorian women poets lived in a time when religion was a vital aspect of their identities. Cynthia Scheinberg examines Anglo-Jewish (Grace Aguilar and Amy Levy) and Christian (Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti) women poets, and argues that there are important connections between the discourses of nineteenth-century poetry, gender and religious identity. Broadly interdisciplinary, the book's methodology relates to studies in poetics, religious studies, feminist literary criticism, and little-known Anglo-Jewish primary sources.
Main Description
Victorian women poets lived in a time when religion was a vital aspect of their identities. Cynthia Scheinberg examines Anglo-Jewish (Grace Aguilar and Amy Levy) and Christian (Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Christina Rossetti) women poets, and argues that there are important connections between the discourses of nineteenth-century poetry, gender and religious identity. Further, Scheinberg argues that Jewish and Christian women poets had a special interest in Jewish discourse; calling on images from Judaism and the Hebrew Scriptures, their poetry created complex arguments about the relationships between Jewish and female artistic identity. She suggests that Jewish and Christian women used poetry as a site for creative and original theological interpretation, and that they entered into dialogue through their poetry about their own and each other's religious and artistic identities. This book's interdisciplinary methodology calls on poetics, religious studies, feminist literary criticism, and little read Anglo-Jewish primary sources.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
'Sweet singers of Israel': gendered and Jewish otherness in Victorian poetics
Elizabeth Barrett Browning and the 'Hebraic monster';4. Christina Rossetti and the Hebraic goblins of the Jewish scriptures
'Judaism rightly reverenced': Grace Aguilar's theological poetics
Amy Levy and the accents of minor(ity) poetry
Notes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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