Catalogue

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Wordsworth, commodification and social concern [electronic resource] : the poetics of modernity /
David Simpson.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
viii, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521898773 (alk. paper), 9780521898775 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521898773 (alk. paper)
9780521898775 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction. The ghost and the machine: spectral modernity -- 1. At the limits of sympathy -- 2. At home with homelessness -- 3. Figures in the mist -- 4. Timing modernity: around 1800 -- 5. The ghostliness of things -- 6. Living images, still lives -- 7. The scene of reading.
catalogue key
8157160
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 260-273) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"David Simpson pursues an elegant thesis: Wordsworth's writing is haunted by specters and automatons because it records the early stages of modernity as shaped by the 'ghostly' work of the commodity form... Other critics have written about Wordsworth and modernity, and Romanticists will note quick, dense treatments of subjects such as time, 'thing theory,' and wartime displacement that have received more extensive discussion elsewhere. This does not diminish the value of the clarity and range of theoretical exposition here or of Simpson's sharp, economical descriptions of the state of modernity... Most admirably, the book demonstrates that political and historical criticism can be evaluative, even appreciative. Simpson reminds us that Wordsworth's poetry remains urgent, not only because of what it may tell us about his modernity and our own but because, as this dazzling series of analyses shows, what is unsaid and undone--what is unsayable and undoable--remains both spectral and present there."-Brian Goldberg, Modern Language Quarterly March 2012
Review of the hardback: 'This is an accomplished scholarly monograph, the importance of which cannot be overstated. By locating Wordsworth's poetics at the very heart of modernity, Simpson revitalizes and recontextualizes a poet who has too long languished in the heritage-industry lumber-room of middle England.' Philological Quarterly
'This is an accomplished scholarly monograph, the importance of which cannot be overstated. By locating Wordsworth's poetics at the very heart of modernity, Simpson revitalizes and recontextualizes a poet who has too long languished in the heritage-industry lumber-room of middle England.' Philological Quarterly
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Leading critic David Simpson offers a new reading of Wordsworth's poetry. Reading Wordsworth alongside Marx and Derrida, Simpson examines Wordsworth's extraordinary and original response to the massive changes in the condition of the modern world at the turn of the nineteenth century.
Description for Bookstore
Leading critic David Simpson offers a reading of Wordsworth's poetry. Reading Wordsworth alongside Marx and Derrida, Simpson examines Wordsworth's extraordinary and original response to the massive changes in the condition of the modern world at the turn of the nineteenth century. This book was first published in 2009.
Main Description
This 2009 reading of Wordworth's poetry by leading critic David Simpson centres on its almost obsessive representation of spectral forms and images of death in life. Wordsworth is reacting, Simpson argues, to the massive changes in the condition of England and the modern world at the turn of the century: mass warfare; the increased scope of machine-driven labour and urbanisation; and the expanding power of commodity form in rendering economic and social exchange more and more abstract, more and more distant from human agency and control. Reading Wordsworth alongside Marx and Derrida, Simpson examines the genesis of an attitude of concern which exemplifies the predicament of modern subjectivity as it faces suffering and distress.
Main Description
This new reading of Wordworth's poetry by leading critic David Simpson centers on its almost obsessive representation of spectral forms and images of death in life. Wordsworth is reacting, Simpson argues, to the massive changes in the condition of England and the modern world at the turn of the century: mass warfare; the increased scope of machine-driven labor and urbanization; and the expanding power of commodity form in rendering economic and social exchange more and more abstract, more and more distant from human agency and control. Reading Wordsworth alongside Marx and Derrida, Simpson examines the genesis of an attitude of concern which exemplifies the predicament of modern subjectivity as it faces suffering and distress.
Table of Contents
Introduction
At the limits of sympathy
At home with homelessness
Figures in the mist
Timing modernity: around 1800
The ghostliness of things
Living images, still lives
The scene of reading
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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