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Fabrication of empire [electronic resource] : the British and the Uganda kingdoms, 1890-1902 /
D.A. Low.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
description
xix, 361 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521843510 (hardback), 9780521843515 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.
isbn
0521843510 (hardback)
9780521843515 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8155695
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 346-352) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-05-01:
Low (emer., British Commonwealth history, Cambridge) adds to his distinguished writings on Uganda with this superb study of how Uganda fell under British imperial control. Distilling a lifetime of scholarly research and a command of massive detailed evidence, he demonstrates that this process was not simply the result of the imposition of British wishes, but emerged from the complex interaction of historical conditions in the numerous precolonial kingdoms in the face of outside pressures from Egypt, Sudan, traders from Zanzibar, French Roman Catholic and British Protestant missionaries, and finally the rivalry of German and British colonial enthusiasts. Low shows that many quite different outcomes were possible as the religious wars between Catholic, Protestant, and Muslim converts in Buganda spread instability around the neighboring states, and the outcome--the creation of a single British colonial state dominated, as the name Uganda suggests, by the Baganda Protestant elite--was by no means inevitable. In the course of the narrative, Low is able to test a number of interpretations of late Victorian imperialism as well as the relationship between London's "official mind," British "men on the spot," and African agency. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. E. Flint emeritus, Dalhousie University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'… an important and carefully crafted study of the dynamics of colonial hegemony in eastern Africa.' Journal of British Studies
"an important and carefully crafted study of the dynamics of colonial hegemony in eastern Frica." -Journal of British Studies
"Low adds to his distinguished writings on Uganda with this superb study of how Uganda fell under British imperial control. Highly recommended." -Choice
"masterful, and contribute significantly to our understanding of the building of empire and imperial culture at its edges, and of the people inexorably caught up in the process." -Journal of African History
'The appearance of Low's book on the creation of Uganda is especially welcome, coming as it does at the end of a distinguished career spent examining empire, its local impact, and its dismantling in both East Africa and South Asia.' Journal of African History
'The appearance of Low's book on the creation of Uganda is especially welcome, coming as it does at the end of a distinguished career spent examining empire, its local impact, and its dismantling in both East Africa and South Asia.' The Journal of African History
"This is an important work by a major historian of Uganda and the British Empire." American Historical Review, Carol Summers, University of Richmond
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
During the 1890s, the Scramble for Africa created the new country of Uganda. This inland territory carved out by British agents first encompassed some 20-30 African kingdoms. In this study, Anthony Low examines how and why the British were able to dominate these rulerships and establish a colonial government.
Description for Bookstore
During the 1890s, the Scramble for Africa created the new country of Uganda. This inland territory carved out by British agents first encompassed some 20-30 African kingdoms. Anthony Low's magisterial new study examines how and why the British were able to dominate these rulerships and establish a colonial government.
Main Description
During the 1890s, the Scramble for Africa created the new country of Uganda. This inland territory carved out by British agents first encompassed some 20-30 African kingdoms. In his magisterial new study, Anthony Low examines how and why the British were able to dominate these rulerships and establish a colonial government. At the same time, the book goes beyond providing a simple narrative account of events; rather, Low seeks to analyse the conditions under which such a transformation was possible. By skilfully negotiating the many complex political and social undercurrents of this period, Low presents a groundbreaking theoretical model of colonial conquest and rule. The result is a major contribution to debates about the making of empire that will appeal to Africanists and imperial historians alike.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
List of abbreviations and locationsp. xi
Sketch mapsp. xiii
Prologue: survey and agendap. 1
Statecraft: external intrusion and local dominionp. 28
Ferment: conversion and revolution in Bugandap. 57
Upcountry: might-have-beens and the Buganda/Uganda outcomep. 86
Warbands: new military formations and ground level imperialismp. 127
Paramountcy: Toro, Busoga and the new overlordsp. 150
Defeat: Kabalega's resistance, Mwanga's revolt and the Sudanese mutinyp. 184
Succession: Nkore and the war of Igumira's eyep. 215
Dénouement: aggregations and rulershipsp. 249
Government: colonial settlements and the Buganda modelp. 281
Capstone: honour, awe and imperialismp. 318
Round up and reviewp. 333
Select bibliographyp. 346
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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