Catalogue


Kant on the human standpoint [electronic resource] /
Béatrice Longuenesse.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
description
xi, 304 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521834783
format(s)
Book
Subjects
subject
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2005.
isbn
0521834783
standard identifier
9780521834780
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8127240
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-296) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...a significant contribution to the project of exploring Kant's holistic and anti-foundationalist epistemology on the basis of a detailed textual analysis, a timely project undoubtedly inspired by the pioneering views of Michael Friedman." --Aaron Fellbaum, University of Graz: Philosophy in Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this collection of essays Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy, and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint - Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgements.
Description for Bookstore
This collection of essays considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy - his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgements. It will appeal to all who are interested in Kant and his thought.
Description for Bookstore
This collection of essays considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy, and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgments. It ranges over Kant's account of our representations of space and time, his conception of the logical forms of judgments, sufficient reason, causality, community, God, freedom, morality, and beauty in nature and art. It will appeal to all who are interested in Kant and his thought.
Main Description
B_atrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, moral philosophy, and aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgments. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgments. Her book will appeal to all interested in Kant and his thought, ranging over Kant's account of our representations of space and time, his conception of the logical forms of judgments, sufficient reason, causality, community, God, freedom, morality, and beauty in nature and art.
Main Description
Béatrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, moral philosophy, and aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgments. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgments. Her book will appeal to all interested in Kant and his thought, ranging over Kant's account of our representations of space and time, his conception of the logical forms of judgments, sufficient reason, causality, community, God, freedom, morality, and beauty in nature and art.
Main Description
In this collection of essays B atrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgements. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world - what Kant calls the 'human point of view' - have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgements. Her discussion ranges over Kant's account of our representations of space and time, his conception of the logical forms of judgements, sufficient reason, causality, community, God, freedom, morality, and beauty in nature and art. Her book will appeal to all who are interested in Kant and his thought.
Main Description
In this collection of essays Bèatrice Longuenesse considers the three aspects of Kant's philosophy, his epistemology and metaphysics of nature, his moral philosophy and his aesthetic theory, under one unifying standpoint: Kant's conception of our capacity to form judgements. She argues that the elements which make up our cognitive access to the world - what Kant calls the 'human point of view' - have an equally important role to play in our moral evaluations and our aesthetic judgements. Her discussion ranges over Kant's account of our representations of space and time, his conception of the logical forms of judgements, sufficient reason, causality, community, God, freedom, morality, and beauty in nature and art. Her book will appeal to all who are interested in Kant and his thought.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Discussions
KantÆs categories and capacity to judge
Synthetics, logical forms, and the objects of our ordinary experience
Synthetics and givenness
The Human Standpoint in KantÆs Transcendental Analytic
Kant on a priori concepts: the metaphysical deduction of the categories
KantÆs deconstruction of the principle of sufficient reason
Kant on causality: what was he trying to prove?
KantÆs standpoint on the whole: disjunctive judgment, community, and the Third Analogy of Experience
The Human Standpoint in the Critical System
The transcendental ideal, and the unity of the critical system
Moral judgment as a judgment of reason
KantÆs leading thread in the analytic of the beautiful
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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