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Japanese apologies for World War II [electronic resource] : a rhetorical study /
Jane W. Yamazaki.
imprint
London : Routledge, 2006.
description
x, 196 p.
ISBN
0415355656 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London : Routledge, 2006.
isbn
0415355656 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8126893
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Post-war Japan offers a compelling case study of national apologies for past wrongdoings. Actions of the Japanese Army and government during the Second World War caused enormous suffering and distress throughout Asia, leaving a legacy of resentment and distrust. Beginning in the mid-1980s, apology for wartime actions became a recurring issue for Japan. Repeated calls for apology from various quarters as well as repeated apologies by Japanese officials provide a rich source for the study of national apology and how public apology discourse develops over time. Unlike most rhetorical studies that focus on apologia in the broad sense, this study concentrates on the strategy of the '¬~true apology.' The study combines rhetorical, sociological and historical approaches to address multiple examples of Japanese apology during the period 1984 to 1995. The author suggests that motive is more complex than the '¬~image restoration' theory that is prevalent in rhetorical theory. More specifically, this study emphasizes repair of relationships, self-reflection leading to a '¬~new' improved identity and affirmation of moral principle as reasons for apology.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Exploring Japanese apologies for World War II, focusing in particular on the period from 1984-1995, this work examines the nature of the apologies, and relating apologies to morality, politics and political communication.
Long Description
How far Japan should apologise for World War II continues to be a major issue. Japan has issued a number of apologies, sometimes not as fulsomely as critics would like, and has confronted contentious issues such as that of 'comfort women'. This book explores Japanese apologies, focusing in particular on the period from 1985 to the present, examining the nature of the apologies, and relating apologies to morality, politics and political communication. The author concludes that general feeling continues to prevail that Japan has not apologised, despite the numerous instances of apologies.
Main Description
Post-war Japan offers a compelling case study of national apologies for past wrongdoings. Actions of the Japanese Army and government during the Second World War caused enormous suffering and distress throughout Asia, leaving a legacy of resentment and distrust. Beginning in the mid-1980s, apology for wartime actions became a recurring issue for Japan. Repeated calls for apology from various quarters as well as repeated apologies by Japanese officials provide a rich source for the study of national apology and how public apology discourse develops over time. Unlike most rhetorical studies that focus on apologia in the broad sense, this study concentrates on the strategy of the true apology. " The study combines rhetorical, sociological and historical approaches to address multiple examples of Japanese apology during the period 1984 to 1995. The author suggests that motive is more complex than the image restoration " theory that is prevalent in rhetorical theory. More specifically, this study emphasizes repair of relationships, self-reflection leading to a new " improved identity and affirmation of moral principle as reasons for apology.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
List of abbreviationsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Study objectivesp. 2
Theoretical frameworkp. 4
A new approachp. 11
Previewp. 23
Accusations, accusers, and audiencep. 24
The accusationsp. 24
The accusers/victimsp. 26
The audience(s)p. 30
Responsibility and guiltp. 31
The early apologies: repairing relationshipsp. 33
Japan-Korea: a legacy of colonialismp. 33
Previous apologiesp. 34
Crafting the apology in publicp. 44
Korean responsep. 49
Sincerity: actions to support apologyp. 52
Summary: relationship apologiesp. 53
The comfort women apologiesp. 57
Towards a new moralityp. 57
The crisisp. 58
The comfort women apologiesp. 59
Full disclosure: investigation and apologyp. 63
The question of compensationp. 65
Summary: the transcendent apologyp. 68
Hosokawa apologies: politics and historyp. 71
Apology and politicsp. 71
The political contextp. 72
A new erap. 73
Apologies of 1993p. 74
Summary: apology, identity, and domestic politicsp. 87
The anti-apologies/conservative apologiap. 90
Conservative politicians "mis-speak"p. 91
Diet resolution 1995p. 93
Conservative apologiap. 95
Why do nations refuse to apologize?p. 97
Murayama apology: on the international stagep. 100
Prime Minister Nakasone's United Nations Commemoration apologyp. 100
Japan's official apologyp. 103
Long-term effects: a successful apology?p. 109
Summary: international exigencyp. 110
Apology as international discoursep. 111
Influence of international apologies on Japanese discoursep. 112
Apology to Japanese Americansp. 113
The German comparisonp. 115
German apologiesp. 118
Summaryp. 125
Conclusionsp. 127
Why do nations apologize?p. 127
The failure of Japanese apologiesp. 129
Apology and apologia: some theoretical implicationsp. 135
Postscriptp. 138
Key documents/apology statementsp. 140
Early documentsp. 140
Comfort women apologiesp. 146
1993 Hosokawa/Doi statementsp. 148
Fiftieth anniversary World War II apologiesp. 153
The language of apologyp. 157
The words of warp. 157
The words of apologyp. 159
Translationp. 163
Glossaryp. 165
Notesp. 168
Referencesp. 180
Indexp. 191
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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