Catalogue


Irish opinion and the American Revolution, 1760-1783 [electronic resource] /
Vincent Morley.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
x, 366 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521813867 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
0521813867 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8126635
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 335-351) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Vincent Morley has worked as a researcher with the Royal Irish Academy's Dictionary of Irish Biography and lectured in eighteenth-century Irish history at the National University of Ireland, Galway.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-07-01:
Morley traces the influence of the American Revolution on the political consciousness of three groups in Irish society--Anglicans, Catholics, and Presbyterians. Eschewing a narrative of events and a thematic approach, he concentrates on the evolution of opinions and identifies changes directly attributable to the revolution. Anglo-Irish political theory was well developed by the time of the revolution; it was in the realm of example that it had the greater impact. While Morley draws impressively on an extensive range of contemporary literature, he does so to the virtual exclusion of governmental sources. The result is that the Revolution's effect on the Dublin administration (one of the key players) is treated less comprehensively than its effect on the three religious groups. Although the latter are shown to have had differing degrees of receptivity to the revolution, all benefited to some degree from it. What emerges is that pro- and anti-American camps existed in all three. The coalescence of opinion between a minority of Presbyterians and lower-class Catholics, previously thought to have emerged only in the 1790s, originated at this time. The particular issues on which the impact of the revolution must be gauged arose from Irish politics and Ireland's relationship with Britain. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. P. Power Trinity and Wycliffe Colleges, University of Toronto
Reviews
Review Quotes
'This is an excellent book ... which will become a major reference point for future work on Ireland in the last half of the eighteenth century.' Irish Studies Review
"This is a book that is essential to its topic and admirable in its judicious handling of a fascinating subject. It is a model of the new transatlantic history." The Historian
"...I find Morley's research impressive and his analysis compelling. He has significantly enhanced our ability to understand events of the late eighteenth century in their own context rather than in that of later periods." - Journal of Modern History, David W. Miller, Carnegie Mellon University
'Drawing on a wide range of sources, especially newspapers, pamphlets, vernacular song, and published sermons, Dr Morley charts the evolution of attitudes in Ireland at each stage of the revolution, whether those produced directly through the operation of American example on Irish opinion or indirectly as a result of altered circumstances arising from the war.' Jeremy Black, H-Albion
'One of the merits of the original study, Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760-1783 by Vincent Morley, is the inclusion of Gaelic manuscripts in its impressive array of sources.'Irish Times
"Morley draws impressively on an extensive range of contemporary literature.... Recommended." Choice
"...Morley's book should be warmly welcomed by all students and scholars of late eighteenth-century Ireland." American Historical Review
'One of the merits of the original study, Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760-1783 by Vincent Morley, is the inclusion of Gaelic manuscripts in its impressive array of sources.' Irish Times
'One of the merits of the original study, Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760–1783 by Vincent Morley, is the inclusion of Gaelic manuscripts in its impressive array of sources.’Irish Times
'One of the merits of the original study, Irish Opinion and the American Revolution, 1760'1783 by Vincent Morley, is the inclusion of Gaelic manuscripts in its impressive array of sources.' Irish Times
"Richly researched...an impressive variety of primary sources....Irish Opinion and the American Revolution represents a useful contribution to Irish and American history..." History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This ground-breaking study examines the impact of the American Revolution and of the international war it precipitated on the political outlook of each section of Irish society.
Main Description
This ground-breaking study traces the impact of the American Revolution on political consciousness in Ireland, from the beginning of colonial unrest in 1760 until the end of hostilities in 1783. Vincent Morley investigates popular opinion among Catholics, Anglicans and Presbyterians in the period, using a dazzling array of sources, including Irish-language documents unknown to other scholars and previously unpublished. The book 's detailed narrative, nuanced analysis and broad focus make a major contribution to the history of Ireland.
Description for Library
This study traces the impact of the American Revolution on political consciousness in Ireland, from the beginning of colonial unrest in 1760 until the end of hostilities in 1783. Vincent Morley investigates popular opinion among Catholics, Anglicans and Presbyterians in the period, using a dazzling array of sources, including Irish-language documents unknown to other scholars and previously unpublished. The book's detailed narrative, nuanced analysis and broad focus make a major contribution to the history of Ireland.
Main Description
This study traces the impact of the American Revolution and of the international war it precipitated on the political outlook of each section of Irish society. Morley uses a dazzling array of sources - newspapers, pamphlets, sermons and political songs, including Irish-language documents unknown to other scholars and previously unpublished - to trace the evolving attitudes of the Anglican, Catholic and Presbyterian communities from the beginning of colonial unrest in the early 1760s until the end of hostilities in 1783. He also reassesses the influence of the American revolutionary war on such developments as Catholic relief, the removal of restrictions on Irish trade, and Britain's recognition of Irish legislative independence. Morley sheds light on the nature of Anglo-Irish patriotism and Catholic political consciousness, and reveals the extent to which the polarities of the 1790s had already emerged by the end of the American war.
Description for Bookstore
This study examines the impact of the American Revolution on Ireland. Vincent Morley investigates popular opinion in the period, using Irish-language sources unknown to other scholars. The book's detailed narrative and nuanced analysis make a significant contribution to the scholarship in the area.
Table of Contents
Preface
Textual note
List of abbreviations
Introduction
Imperial unrest, 1760âÇô1775
Colonial rebellion, 1775âÇô1778
International war, 1778âÇô1781
Britain defeated, 1781âÇô1783
Postscript
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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