Catalogue


Human goodness [electronic resource] : pragmatic variations on platonic themes /
Paul Schollmeier.
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
description
xiii, 302 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521863848 (hardback), 9780521863841 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
More Details
imprint
New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
isbn
0521863848 (hardback)
9780521863841 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
An apology -- The method in question -- Human happiness -- Moral freedoms -- Moral imperatives -- A question of cosmology -- Human virtue -- A symposium.
catalogue key
8124779
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-293) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Schollmeier has...reminded us how infinitely fascinating and important the Platonic conception of happiness is." Alan Pichanick, St. John's College, Annapolis
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Human Goodness' presents an original, pragmatic moral theory that successfully revives and revitalises the classical Greek concept of happiness. It includes an in-depth discussion of our freedoms, our obligations, and our virtues, as well as adroit comparisons with the moral theories of Kant and Hume.
Description for Bookstore
Human Goodness presents an original, pragmatic moral theory that successfully revives and revitalizes the classical Greek concept of happiness. It includes in-depth discussions of our freedoms, our obligations, and our virtues, as well as adroit comparisons with the moral theories of Kant and Hume.
Main Description
Human Goodness, first published in 2006, presents an original, pragmatic moral theory that successfully revives and revitalizes the classical Greek concept of happiness. It also includes in-depth discussions of our freedoms, our obligations, and our virtues, as well as adroit comparisons with the moral theories of Kant and Hume. Paul Schollmeier explains that the Greeks define happiness as an activity that we may perform for its own sake. Obvious examples might include telling stories, making music, or dancing. He then demonstrates that we may use the pragmatic method to discover and to define innumerable activities of this kind. Schollmeier's demonstration rests on the modest assumption that our happiness takes not one ideal form, but many empirical forms.
Description for Bookstore
Human Goodness, first published in 2006, presents an original, pragmatic moral theory that successfully revives and revitalizes the classical Greek concept of happiness. It includes in-depth discussions of our freedoms, our obligations, and our virtues, as well as adroit comparisons with the moral theories of Kant and Hume.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Preface
Schema
An apology
The method in question
Human happiness
Moral freedoms
Moral imperatives
A question of cosmology
Human virtue
A symposium
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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