Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Hong Kong film, Hollywood, and the new global cinema [electronic resource] : no film is an island /
edited by Gina Marchetti and Tan See Kam.
imprint
Abingdon, [England] ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
description
p. cm.
ISBN
0415380685 (hardback : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Abingdon, [England] ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
isbn
0415380685 (hardback : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8124593
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Hong Kong is now a major player of the new global cinema. Hong Kong cinema has strong connections both to Hollywood, and to world and Asian regional markets, while scholarly interest in the history and development of Hong Kong cinema has grown considerably in recent years. This book examines a wide range of aspects of Hong Kong cinema, and discusses the role of Hong Kong cinema in changing global film markets. It explores Hong Kong cinema's inextricable links with China, Korea, Japan, Southeast Asia, Australia, the United States, and the Chinese diaspora. It considers Hong Kong's connection with Hollywood, which involves ties that bring together art cinema and popular genres as well as film festivals and the media marketplace with popular transnational genres, and demonstrates how Hong Kong film, throughout its history, has challenged, redefined, expanded, and exceeded its borders. It includes significant new analysis of older films, such as New Wave classic Shanghai Blues; new perspectives on established genres, including martial arts, action and horror; and reconsiderations of neglected directors, most notably Johnnie To. Overall, this book examines Hong Kong film in the contexts of globally interconnected filmmaking practices and film scholarship.
Back Cover Copy
In recent years, with the establishment of the Hong Kong Film Archive and growing scholarly interest in the history of Hong Kong cinema, previously neglected historical documents and difficult-to-access films have offered new research materials. As Hong Kong film history comes into sharper focus, its inextricable links across the decades to Southeast Asia, Korea, Japan, the United States, and to the far reaches of the Chinese diaspora have also become more evident. Hong Kong's connection with Hollywood involves ties that bring together art cinema and popular genres as well as film festivals and the media marketplace with popular transnational genres. Giving fresh and facsinating insights into the vibrant area of Hong Kong, this exciting new book links Hong Kong with world film culture both within and beyond the commercial Hollywood paradigm. It emphasizes Hong Kong film in relation to other cinema industries, including Hollywood, and demonstrates that Hong Kong film, throughout its history, has challenged, redefined, expanded, and exceeded its borders.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Giving fresh and fascinating insights into the vibrant area of Hong Kong, this book links Hong Kong with world film culture both within and beyond the commercial Hollywood paradigm.
Long Description
Hong Kong cinema is especially vibrant at present, and is very interestingly placed, with strong connections both to Hollywood, and to world and Asian regional markets. In addition, with the establishment of the Hong Kong Film Archive scholarly interest in the history and development of Hong Kong cinema has grown considerably in recent years. This book examines a wide range of aspects of Hong Kong cinema, and discusses the role of Hong Kong cinema in changing global film markets. It explores Hong Kong cinema's inextricable links with Southeast Asia, Korea, Japan, the United States, and the Chinese diaspora. It considers Hong Kong's connection with Hollywood, which involves ties that bring together art cinema and popular genres as well as film festivals and the media marketplace with popular transnational genres, and demonstrates how Hong Kong film, throughout its history, has challenged, redefined, expanded, and exceeded its borders.
Main Description
In recent years, with the establishment of the Hong Kong Film Archive and growing scholarly interest in the history of Hong Kong cinema, previously neglected historical documents and difficult-to-access films have offered new research materials. As Hong Kong film history comes into sharper focus, its inextricable links across the decades to Southeast Asia, Korea, Japan, the United States, and to the far reaches of the Chinese diaspora have also become more evident. Hong Kong "s connection with Hollywood involves ties that bring together art cinema and popular genres as well as film festivals and the media marketplace with popular transnational genres. Giving fresh and facsinating insights into the vibrant area of Hong Kong, this exciting new book links Hong Kong with world film culture both within and beyond the commercial Hollywood paradigm. It emphasizes Hong Kong film in relation to other cinema industries, including Hollywood, and demonstrates that Hong Kong film, throughout its history, has challenged, redefined, expanded, and exceeded its borders.
Table of Contents
Notes on contributorsp. vii
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introduction: Hong Kong cinema and global changep. 1
Chinese on the move: 'Hongkongers' abroadp. 11
From South Pacific to Shanghai Blues: no film is an islandp. 13
The heroic flux in John Woo's trans-Pacific passage: from Confucian brotherhood to American selfhoodp. 35
Hong Kong film goes to Americap. 50
Hong Kong television in Chinatown: translocal context(s) and transnational social formationsp. 63
Thailand in the Hong Kong cinematic imaginationp. 77
Hong Kong-Australian imaginaries: Three Australian films by Clara Lawp. 91
To-ing and fro-ing: transnational genresp. 107
Generic ghosts: remaking the new 'Asian horror film'p. 109
Copies of copies in Hollywood and Hong Kong cinemas: rethinking the woman-warrior figuresp. 126
The Noir East: Hong Kong filmmakers' transmutation of a Hollywood genre?p. 137
Scenes of 'in-action' and noir characteristics in the films of Johnnie To (Kei-Fung)p. 159
International players and a global nichep. 165
Hong Kong goes international: the case of Golden Harvestp. 167
Distant screens: film festivals and the global projection of Hong Kong cinemap. 177
Competing regions: the chromatics of the urban fixp. 193
Jackie Chan, tourism, and the performing agencyp. 206
Niche cinema, or. Kill Bill with Shaolin Soccerp. 219
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 263
Indexp. 277
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem