Catalogue

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Democracy, revolution, and monarchism in early American literature [electronic resource] /
Paul Downes.
imprint
Cambridge, U.K.; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
xii, 239 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521813395
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, U.K.; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
0521813395
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8116515
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-236) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A valuable new reading of American Revolutionary culture.' American Literature
"Downe's Democracy deconstructs the traditional opposition between monarchy and democracy, thus advancing a compelling argument of how the extension of democratic rights owes much to its inheritance from monarchy. Unapologetically theoretical, Downes creates an engaging dialogue with the work of philosophers and political theorists like Derrida, Balibar, Adrendt, Laclau and Mouffe. The result is a work that provides a fresh methodological approach to the field of early American literature." English Studies in Canada,/i Pablo Ramirez, University of Guelph
"....Downes's study presents a valuable new reading of American Revolutionary culture, and it stands as an example of the important work that remains to be done within the confines of American studies and the geographical boundaries of the United States." American Literature
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Here Paul Downes combines literary criticism and political history in order to explore responses to the rejection of monarchism in the American revolutionary era.
Description for Bookstore
A radical revision of some of the most cherished elements of early American cultural identity. Downes argues that the whole construction of a Republican public sphere actually borrowed central features of monarchical rule. Downes discovers this theme in a wide range of American novels and a variety of political documents.
Description for Bookstore
Paul Downes combines literary criticism and political history in order to explore responses to the rejection of monarchism in the American revolutionary era. He claims that the post-revolutionary American state and the new democratic citizen inherited some of the complex features of absolute monarchy, even as they were strenuously trying to assert their difference from it.
Description for Bookstore
Paul Downes offers a radical revision of some of the most cherished elements of early American cultural identity. The founding texts and writers of the Republic, he claims, did not wholly displace what they claimed to oppose. Instead, Downes argues, the whole construction of a Republican public sphere actually borrowed and adapted central features of Monarchical rule. Downes discovers this theme not only in a wide range of American novels, but also in readings of a variety of political documents that created the philosophical culture of the American revolutionary period.
Main Description
Paul Downes combines literary criticism and political history in order to explore responses to the rejection of monarchism in the American revolutionary era. Downes' analysis considers the Declaration of Independence, Franklin's Autobiography, Crèvecoeur's Letters From An American Farmer, and the works of America's first significant literary figures including Brockden Brown, Washington Irving and James Fennimore Cooper. He claims that the new democratic American state and citizen inherited some of the complex features of absolute monarchy, even as they were strenuously trying to assert their difference from it. In chapters that consider the revolution's mock execution of George III, the Elizabethan notion of the 'king's two bodies', and the political significance of the secret ballot, Downes points to the traces of monarchical political structures within the practices and discourses of early American democracy. This is an ambitious study of an important theme in early American culture and society.
Main Description
Paul Downes combines literary criticism and political history in order to explore responses to the rejection of monarchism in the American revolutionary era. Downes' analysis considers the Declaration of Independence, Franklin's autobiography, Crévecoeur's Letters From An American Farmer and the works of America's first significant literary figures including Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving and James Fenimore Cooper. He claims that the post-revolutionary American state and the new democratic citizen inherited some of the complex features of absolute monarchy, even as they were strenuously trying to assert their difference from it. In chapters that consider the revolution's mock execution of George III, the Elizabethan notion of the 'king's two bodies' and the political significance of the secret ballot, Downes points to the traces of monarchical political structures within the practices and discourses of early American democracy. This is an ambitious study of an important theme in early American culture and society.
Main Description
Paul Downes combines literary criticism and political history in order to explore responses to the rejection of monarchism in the American revolutionary era. Downes' analysis considers the Declaration of Independence, Franklin's autobiography, Crvecoeur's Letters From An American Farmer and the works of America's first significant literary figures including Charles Brockden Brown, Washington Irving and James Fenimore Cooper. He claims that the post-revolutionary American state and the new democratic citizen inherited some of the complex features of absolute monarchy, even as they were strenuously trying to assert their difference from it. In chapters that consider the revolution's mock execution of George III, the Elizabethan notion of the 'king's two bodies' and the political significance of the secret ballot, Downes points to the traces of monarchical political structures within the practices and discourses of early American democracy. This is an ambitious study of an important theme in early American culture and society.
Main Description
Paul Downes offers a radical revision of some of the most cherished elements of early American cultural identity. The founding texts and writers of the Republic, he claims, did not wholly displace what they claimed to oppose. Instead, Downes argues, the entire construction of a Republican public sphere actually borrowed and adapted central features of Monarchical rule. Downes discovers this theme not only in a wide range of American novels, but also in readings of a variety of political documents that created the philosophical culture of the American revolutionary period.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgements
Introduction: the spell of democracy
Monarchophobia: reading the mock executions of 1776
Crÿvecoeur's revolutionary loyalism
Citizen subjects: the memoirs of Stephen Burroughs and Benjamin Franklin
An epistemology of the ballot box: Brockden Brown's secrets
Luxury, effeminacy, corruption: Irving and the gender of democracy
Afterword: the revolution's last word
Notes, Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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