Catalogue


Death and memory in early medieval Britain [electronic resource] /
Howard Williams.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
description
xiv, 254 p. : ill., maps, plans ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0521840198 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
isbn
0521840198 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8116308
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'It is one of the great strengths of his book that it treats the whole of mainland Britain (and the isle of Man) on an even footing and over more than half a millennium bringing out this variation as well as some common themes and perhaps beliefs ... for 50 years prehistorians have, perhaps rightly, deplored the intellectual simplicity of the infant discipline of medieval archaeology. This is one of the books that will make them rethink that.'British Archaeology
'... nuanced and insightful ... thought-provoking ...' Archaeological Review from Cambridge
Review of the hardback: 'Howard William's book should launch a mature, careful and temperate debate ...' Journal of Medieval Archaeology
Review of the hardback: '... nuanced and insightful ... thought-provoking ...' Archaeological Review from Cambridge
Review of the hardback: 'Howard William's excellent book is thus greatly to be welcomed as the first extended survey of how the dead were remembered in early medieval Britain.' Antiquity
Review of the hardback: 'It is one of the great strengths of his book that it treats the whole of mainland Britain (and the isle of Man) on an even footing and over more than half a millennium bringing out this variation as well as some common themes and perhaps beliefs ... for 50 years prehistorians have, perhaps rightly, deplored the intellectual simplicity of the infant discipline of medieval archaeology. This is one of the books that will make them rethink that.' British Archaeology
'Howard William's book should launch a mature, careful and temperate debate ...' Journal of Medieval Archaeology
'Howard William's excellent book is thus greatly to be welcomed as the first extended survey of how the dead were remembered in early medieval Britain.' Antiquity
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
An innovative application of theories of memory and material culture to an early historic society, this book uses the early medieval cemetery in Britain between 1100 AD and 400 as a rich and complex data set, addressing the commemorative functions of funerary ritual using archaeological remains as its evidence base.
Main Description
How were the dead remembered in early medieval Britain? Originally published in 2006, this innovative study demonstrates how perceptions of the past and the dead, and hence social identities, were constructed through mortuary practices and commemoration between c. 400-1100 AD. Drawing on archaeological evidence from across Britain, including archaeological discoveries, Howard Williams presents a fresh interpretation of the significance of portable artefacts, the body, structures, monuments and landscapes in early medieval mortuary practices. He argues that materials and spaces were used in ritual performances that served as 'technologies of remembrance', practices that created shared 'social' memories intended to link past, present and future. Through the deployment of material culture, early medieval societies were therefore selectively remembering and forgetting their ancestors and their history. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period.
Description for Bookstore
An innovative application of theories of memory and material culture to an early historic society, this 2006 book uses the early medieval cemetery in Britain between 400-1100 AD as a rich and complex data set, addressing the commemorative functions of funerary ritual using archaeological remains as its evidence base.
Table of Contents
List of figuresp. viii
Prefacep. xiii
Death, memory and material culturep. 1
Objects of memoryp. 36
Remembering through the bodyp. 79
Graves as mnemonic compositionsp. 117
Monuments and memoryp. 145
Death and landscapep. 179
Remembering, forgetting and the mortuary contextp. 215
Referencesp. 222
Indexp. 251
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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