Catalogue


Culture and conquest in Mongol Eurasia [electronic resource] /
Thomas T. Allsen.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
description
xiii, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521803357
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 2001.
isbn
0521803357
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8115924
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 212-237) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-11-01:
Allsen (Trenton State College) concentrates on the vast Eurasian cultural exchange during the Pax Mongolica. The two courts in China and Iran ruled by descendants of Tolui utilized their cultural resources and mutually supported one another during the late 13th and early 14th centuries. Nomadic Mongols facilitated this transcontinental exchange by selecting what was to be appropriated, apportioned, and transmitted, filtering all through their own social and cultural norms and exchanging items that supplemented their indigenous traditions and institutions. Rather than being outsiders, the nomadic Mongols were central to this extensive East-West exchange. Consequently, the Mongol Empire served as a type of cultural clearinghouse for Eurasian commodities, ideas, and technologies. Allsen focuses particularly on historiography, geography and cartography, agriculture, cuisine, medicine, astronomy, and printing. He looks at the nature, conditions, and processes of this unique transmission and at the overall range, frequency, and intensity of contacts between the Mongols of China and Iran. The 25-page bibliography lists studies based on Chinese, Middle Eastern, Russian, and European sources in the appropriate languages, and includes all the most recent publications on the Mongols. This book belongs in all undergraduate and graduate school libraries; indeed, it should be in the libraries of all campuses that offer courses on world history. G. G. Guzman Bradley University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Thomas Allsen’s book is a very compact and informative account of the cultural changes which took place during the supremacy of the Mongols. Allsen is able to share with the reader his impressive knowledge of the Arabic, Persian, and Chinese sources regarding the Mongols. The cross-cultural links, their implications and their background in this highly interesting period of history are presented in a systematic manner, making the book of great value for scholars in a variety of fields.'Bibliotheca Orientalis
"...Culture and Conquest in Mongol Eurasia is a superb book and a model of accurate scholarship. All those interested in late medieval China or Iran, in the Mongol empire, or in international cross-cultural contact before European dominance will profit greatly from reading Professor Allsen's fascinating story." Islamic Studies
'... this is mature scholarship at its best, and a must not only for every student of the Mongol empire, but also for cultural and world historians, historians of China and the Muslim world, and anybody interested in the ongoing exchange between East and West.'Journal of the American Oriental Society
"This splendid work charts a maze of hitherto unlooked-for circuits and connections, identifying technical fields that warrant further investigation. Erudite, cogent, and original, it serves the Mongols well." International History Review
'The focus of this path-breaking study is the extensive exchanges between Iran and China ... is informative and erudite and promises to become a classic in the field.'The Middle East
"This book belongs in all undergraduate and graduate school libraries; indeed, it should be in the libraries of all campuses that offer courses on world history." Choice
'The focus of this path-breaking study is the extensive exchanges between Iran and China ... is informative and erudite and promises to become a classic in the field.' The Middle East
'Thomas Allsen's book is a very compact and informative account of the cultural changes which took place during the supremacy of the Mongols. Allsen is able to share with the reader his impressive knowledge of the Arabic, Persian, and Chinese sources regarding the Mongols. The cross-cultural links, their implications and their background in this highly interesting period of history are presented in a systematic manner, making the book of great value for scholars in a variety of fields.' Bibliotheca Orientalis
'Thomas Allsen's book is a very compact and informative account of the cultural changes which took place during the supremacy of the Mongols. Allsen is able to share with the reader his impressive knowledge of the Arabic, Persian, and Chinese sources regarding the Mongols. The cross-cultural links, their implications and their background in this highly interesting period of history are presented in a systematic manner, making the book of great value for scholars in a variety of fields.'Bibliotheca Orientalis
'... will occupy and entertain specialists for some time to come ...'Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
'... will occupy and entertain specialists for some time to come ...’Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
'... will occupy and entertain specialists for some time to come ...' Bulletin of the School of Oriental & African Studies
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2002
Choice, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Thomas Allsen’s latest book breaks new scholarly boundaries in its exploration of cultural and scientific exchanges across Mongol Eurasia. Contrary to popular belief, Mongol rulers were intensely interested in the culture of their sedentary subjects and, under their auspices, commodities, ideologies and technologies were disseminated from East to West.
Description for Bookstore
Thomas Allsen's latest book breaks new scholarly boundaries in its exploration of cultural and scientific exchanges across Mongol Eurasia. Contrary to popular belief, Mongol rulers were intensely interested in the culture of their sedentary subjects and, under their auspices, commodities, ideologies and technologies were disseminated from East to West.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In the 13th century, the Mongols created a vast transcontinental empire that functioned as a cultural clearing house for the Old World. Under Mongol auspices various commodities, technologies and ideologies were disseminated across Eurasia.
Main Description
Thomas Allsen is one of the foremost historians of the Mongol empire. His latest book breaks new scholarly boundaries in its exploration of cultural and scientific exchanges between Iran and China. Contrary to popular belief, Mongol rulers were intensely interested in the culture of their sedentary subjects. Under their auspices, various commodities, ideologies and technologies were disseminated across Eurasia. The result was a lively exchange of scientists, scholars and ritual specialists between East and West. The book is broad-ranging and erudite and promises to become a classic in the field.
Main Description
In the thirteenth century, the Mongols created a vast transcontinental empire that functioned as a cultural 'clearing house' for the Old World. Under Mongol auspices various commodities, ideologies and technologies were disseminated across Eurasia. The focus of this path-breaking study is the extensive exchanges between Iran and China. The Mongol rulers of these two ancient civilizations 'shared' the cultural resources of their realms with one another. The result was a lively traffic in specialist personnel and scholarly literature between East and West. These exchanges ranged from cartography to printing, from agriculture to astronomy. The book concludes by asking why the Mongols made such heavy use of sedentary scholars and specialists in the elaboration of their court culture and why they initiated so many exchanges across Eurasia. This is a work of great erudition which crosses new scholarly boundaries in its analysis of communication and culture in the Mongol empire.
Table of Contents
Background
Introduction
Before the Mongols
Political-Economic Relations
Formation of the Il-qans, 1251âÇô65
Grand Qans and Il-qans, 1265âÇô95
Continuity and change under Ghazan, 1295âÇô1304
Sultans and Grand Qans, 1304âÇô35
Economic ties
Overview of the relationship
Intermediaries
Marco Polo and Po-lo
Qubilai and Bolad Aqa
Rashid al-Din and Pulad chinksank
Cultural Exchange
Historiography
Geography and cartography
Agriculture
Cuisine
Medicine
Astronomy
Printing
Analysis and Conclusions
Models and methods
Agency
Filtering
Summation
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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