Catalogue


The British moralists on human nature and the birth of secular ethics [electronic resource] /
Michael B. Gill.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
description
viii, 359 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521852463, 9780521852463
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
isbn
0521852463
9780521852463
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Whichcote and Cudworth -- Shaftesbury -- Hutcheson -- David Hume.
catalogue key
8112452
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 341-349) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Gill leads us to revise our understanding of the opposition between 'rationalism' and 'sentimentalism'...On the philological level, the work is very well documented and argued." Laurent Jaffro, Journal of the History of Philosophy
"Gill's discussion is consistently lucid and insightful, examining difficult texts with a deft hand that rarely labors over the subject matter." 18th Century Scotland, Daniel Carey, National University of Ireland- Galway
"Gill's discussion is consistently lucid and insightful, examining difficult texts with a deft hand that rarely labors over the subject matter."
"Gill leads us to revise our understanding of the opposition between 'rationalism' and 'sentimentalism'...On the philological level, the work is very well documented and argued."
This approach offers an uninterrupted presentation of the historical story, while still tendering to those interested in the many contemporary debates material for their consideration. I give this book a hearty recommendation for anyone with even a passing interest in the history of ethics. One need not be a scholar on these matters to enjoy and benefit from reading it....Michael Gill's book is also indispensable for the scholar. I find myself in awe of his accomplishments here, and his book will undoubtedly be a touchstone for future discussions of early modern moral thought." Elizabeth S. Radcliffe Nortre Dame Philosophical Reviews
This approach offers an uninterrupted presentation of the historical story, while still tendering to those interested in the many contemporary debates material for their consideration. I give this book a hearty recommendation for anyone with even a passing interest in the history of ethics. One need not be a scholar on these matters to enjoy and benefit from reading it....Michael Gill's book is also indispensable for the scholar. I find myself in awe of his accomplishments here, and his book will undoubtedly be a touchstone for future discussions of early modern moral thought."
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy, effecting a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself.
Description for Bookstore
Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, this 2006 volume shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy, effecting a shift from considering morality as independent of human nature to considering it as part of human nature itself.
Main Description
Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this 2006 volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then from theistic commitments altogether. Examining in detail the arguments of Whichcote, Cudworth, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson against Calvinist conceptions of original sin and egoistic conceptions of human motivation, Gill also demonstrates how Hume combined the ideas of earlier British moralists with his own insights to produce an account of morality and human nature that undermined some of his predecessors' most deeply held philosophical goals.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Whichcote and Cudworth
The Negative Answer of English Calvinismp. 7
Whichcote and Cudworth's Positive Answerp. 12
Whichcote and Cudworth on Religious Libertyp. 30
Rationalism, Sentimentalism, and Ralph Cudworthp. 38
The Emergence of Non-Christian Ethicsp. 58
Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury and the Cambridge Platonistsp. 77
Shaftesbury's Inquiry: A Misanthropic Faith in Human Naturep. 83
The Moralists; a Philosophical Rhapsodyp. 100
Shaftesbury's Two Reasons to Be Virtuous: A Philosophical Fault Linep. 118
Hutcheson
Early Influences on Francis Hutchesonp. 135
Hutcheson's Attack on Egoismp. 141
Hutcheson's Attack on Moral Rationalismp. 156
A Copernican Positive Answer and an Attenuated Moral Realismp. 168
Explaining Away Vice, or Hutcheson's Defense of a Copernican, Theistic Positive Answerp. 181
David Hume
David Hume's New "Science of Man"p. 201
Hume's Arguments against Moral Rationalismp. 209
Hume's Associative Moral Sentimentsp. 214
Hume's Progressive View of Human Naturep. 226
Comparison and Contingency in Hume's Account of Moralityp. 241
What Is a Humean Account, and What Difference Does It Make?p. 262
Notesp. 271
Bibliographyp. 341
Indexp. 351
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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