Catalogue


The age of Elizabeth in the age of Johnson [electronic resource] /
Jack Lynch.
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
description
xi, 224 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521819075
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2003.
isbn
0521819075
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8109386
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-218) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-09-01:
Cultures define themselves through comparisons to previous cultures, even if they have to reinterpret historical detail to do so. Using Samuel Johnson and his contemporaries as intellectual benchmarks, Lynch (English, Rutgers Univ.) examines 18th-century views of the 16th century and persuasively demonstrates that the Elizabethan Age provided a standard against which Britons of the Augustan Age could measure their own national character. Eighteenth-century Britain considered the Renaissance a significant divider between medieval barbarity and modern enlightenment. British literati looked to Petrarch, Shakespeare, and Milton and found in their lives and works much to admire, even though Johnson had to defend the mentions of magic and enchantment in Shakespeare's plays, arguing that after all, the people of Shakespeare's era had not entirely cast off their belief in such things. According to 18th-century Protestants, the decline of Catholicism under the Tudors had encouraged an upsurge in learning before the troubled 17th had corrupted politics, literature, and the English language under the malign influence of the Stewarts and the Cromwells. Endeavoring to surmount this tragic interruption, Johnson and his contemporaries extolled the Elizabethan Age as the true forerunner of their own. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. J. Jenkins Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'An original and major contribution to the reader's understanding of eighteenth-century cultural identity.' The New Rambler
'An original and major contribution to the reader's understanding of eighteenth-century cultural identity.'The New Rambler
'An original and major contribution to the reader’s understanding of eighteenth-century cultural identity.’The New Rambler
"[A] worthwhile volume." H-ALBION
"Jack Lynch has undertaken an important task in explaining the eighteenth century's view of its immediate literary predecessors... Lynch lets the different versions of 18th century responses to the Renaissance play against each other in a postmodern way." The East-Central Intelligencer
"Lynch has produced a set of excellent essays...[he] gives his own readers a number of compelling stories, solidly researched and richly rewarding to read." Martine Watson Brownley, Emory University, Albion
Review of the hardback: 'An original and major contribution to the reader's understanding of eighteenth-century cultural identity.' The New Rambler
"well-designed book...a useful start for anyone interested in either period and English literary history in general. It has thirty-three pages of notes and a twenty-page bibliography that helpfully point readers to further resources, with a mixture of secondary sources, which are readily available, and primary texts, which attest to Lynch's original research." Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England Bernice W. Kliman
"Recommended."Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 'The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson', Jack Lynch explores 18th century British conceptions of the Renaissance and the historical, intellectual and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period.
Description for Bookstore
In The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson, Jack Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period. Scholars, editors, historians, religious thinkers, linguists, and literary critics of the period all defined themselves in relation to 'the last age' or 'the age of Elizabeth'. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to cultural as well as literary historians of the eighteenth century.
Description for Bookstore
Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period. Scholars, editors, historians, religious thinkers, linguists, and literary critics of the period all defined themselves in relation to 'the last age' or 'the age of Elizabeth'.
Description for Bookstore
Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to cultural as well as literary historians of the eighteenth century.
Main Description
In The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson, Jack Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period. Scholars, editors, historians, religious thinkers, linguists, and literary critics of the period all defined themselves in relation to 'the last age' or 'the age of Elizabeth'. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century thinkers reworked older historical schemes to suit their own needs, turning to the ages of Petrarch and Poliziano, Erasmus and Scaliger, Shakespeare, Spenser, and Queen Elizabeth to define their culture in contrast to the preceding age. They derived a powerful sense of modernity from the comparison, which proved essential to the constitution of a national character. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to cultural as well as literary historians of the eighteenth century.
Main Description
In The Age of Elizabeth in the Age of Johnson, Jack Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put during the period. Scholars, editors, historians, religious thinkers, linguists and literary critics of the period all defined themselves in relation to 'the last age' or 'the age of Elizabeth'. Seventeenth- and eighteenth-century thinkers reworked older historical schemes to suit their own needs, turning to the ages of Petrarch and Poliziano, Erasmus and Scaliger, Shakespeare, Spenser, and Queen Elizabeth to define their culture in contrast to the preceding age. They derived a powerful sense of modernity from the comparison, which proved essential to the constitution of a national character. This interdisciplinary study will be of interest to cultural as well as literary historians of the eighteenth century.
Main Description
Jack Lynch explores eighteenth-century British conceptions of the Renaissance, and the historical, intellectual, and cultural uses to which the past was put. He argues that scholars, editors, historians, religious thinkers, linguists, and literary critics defined themselves in relation to "the last age" or "the age of Elizabeth". This interdisciplinary study is of interest to cultural as well as literary historians of the eighteenth century.
Table of Contents
Preface
Note on the texts and citation
List of abbreviations
Introduction
Struggling to emerge from barbarity: historiography and the idea of the classic
Learning's triumph: historicism and the spirit of the age
Call Britannia's glories back to view: Tudor history and Hanoverian historians
The rage of Reformation: religious controversy and political stability
The ground-work of stile: language and national identity
Studied barbarity: Jonson, Spenser, and the idea of progress
The last age: Renaissance lost
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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