Catalogue


Yorick's world [electronic resource] : science and the knowing subject /
Peter Caws.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
description
xvi, 393 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520079191 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1993.
isbn
0520079191 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8106062
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 363-383) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"These essays are the work of a genial, literate mind exploring a wide range of issues mainly centered on the philosophy of science and epistemology, but including considerations of literature, language, and social practice. Caws's work, in general, represents an independent and alternative current in the philosophy of science, one which is informed by a broader conception of scientific thought and activity than are the usual approaches of either the traditional logical-empiricists or the more recent post-positivists. And he has a knack for deflating the latest fashionable claims early in the game, even before fashion has set in."--Marx Wartofsky, Editor,The Philosophical Forum
Flap Copy
"These essays are the work of a genial, literate mind exploring a wide range of issues mainly centered on the philosophy of science and epistemology, but including considerations of literature, language, and social practice. Caws's work, in general, represents an independent and alternative current in the philosophy of science, one which is informed by a broader conception of scientific thought and activity than are the usual approaches of either the traditional logical-empiricists or the more recent post-positivists. And he has a knack for deflating the latest fashionable claims early in the game, even before fashion has set in."--Marx Wartofsky, Editor, The Philosophical Forum
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1993-10:
The underlying theme to the papers constituting this volume is the primacy of human intentionality in the philosophy of science. The work is loosely arranged around several important themes including explanation, the induction problem, causality, technology, and the status of scientific knowledge. The value of these papers is not so much in the presentation of Caws's best work over the past 30 years (for some of it is not), but rather in the revelation of one philosopher's odyssey from physics through mainstream philosophy of science to some conceptual schemes of existentialism and phenomenology. The world as described by science is not viewed here as a hypothesized real world, but as the life-world of an individual. Just as Hamlet reflects on the life-world of Yorick while contemplating the skull, so likewise the reader is invited to examine Caws's thought-world while perusing these 27 papers. Although some of the work is dated, all is enjoyable, and the book is recommended for advanced undergraduate and graduate libraries supporting study of the philosophy of science. L. C. Archie; Lander College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1993
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Summaries
Long Description
Peter Caws provides a fresh and often iconoclastic treatment of some of the most vexing problems in the philosophy of science: explanation, induction, causality, evolution, discovery, artificial intelligence, and the social implications of technological rationality. Caws's work has been shaped equally by the insights of Continental philosophy and a concern with scientific practice. In these twenty-eight essays spanning more than a quarter of a century, he ranges from discussions of the work of French philosopher Gaston Bachelard, to relations between science and surrealism, to the concept of intentionality, to the limits of quantitative description. A lively mix of history, theory, speculation, and analysis,Yorick's Worldpresents a vision of science that includes human history and social life. It will interest professional philosophers and scientists, and at the same time its directness will make it readily accessible to nontechnical readers.
Main Description
Peter Caws provides a fresh and often iconoclastic treatment of some of the most vexing problems in the philosophy of science: explanation, induction, causality, evolution, discovery, artificial intelligence, and the social implications of technological rationality. Cawss work has been shaped equally by the insights of Continental philosophy and a concern with scientific practice. In these twenty-eight essays spanning more than a quarter of a century, he ranges from discussions of the work of French philosopher Gaston Bachelard, to relations between science and surrealism, to the concept of intentionality, to the limits of quantitative description. A lively mix of history, theory, speculation, and analysis, "Yoricks World" presents a vision of science that includes human history and social life. It will interest professional philosophers and scientists, and at the same time its directness will make it readily accessible to nontechnical readers.
Main Description
Peter Caws provides a fresh and often iconoclastic treatment of some of the most vexing problems in the philosophy of science: explanation, induction, causality, evolution, discovery, artificial intelligence, and the social implications of technological rationality. Caws's work has been shaped equally by the insights of Continental philosophy and a concern with scientific practice. In these twenty-eight essays spanning more than a quarter of a century, he ranges from discussions of the work of French philosopher Gaston Bachelard, to relations between science and surrealism, to the concept of intentionality, to the limits of quantitative description. A lively mix of history, theory, speculation, and analysis, Yorick's World presents a vision of science that includes human history and social life. It will interest professional philosophers and scientists, and at the same time its directness will make it readily accessible to nontechnical readers.
Table of Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction: From Physics to the Human Sciences - The Itinerary of an Attitudep. 1
Explanation
Preface to Part Ip. 15
Aspects of Hempel's Philosophy of Sciencep. 17
Science and System: On the Unity and Diversity of Scientific Theoryp. 35
Gosse's Omphalos Theory and the Eccentricity of Beliefp. 54
Creationism and Evolutionp. 74
Hume's Problem
Preface to Part IIp. 87
The Paradox of Induction and the Inductive Wagerp. 89
The Structure of Discoveryp. 98
Induction and the Kindness of Naturep. 112
Logic and Causality
Preface to Part IIIp. 125
Three Logics, or the Possibility of the Improbablep. 127
Mach's Principle and the Laws of Logicp. 138
A Quantum Theory of Causalityp. 146
A Negative Interpretation of the Causal Principlep. 154
Machines and Practices
Preface to Part IVp. 165
Science, Computers, and the Complexity of Naturep. 167
Praxis and Technep. 176
On the Concept of a Domain of Praxisp. 185
Individual Praxis in Real Timep. 191
Towards a Philosophy of Technologyp. 196
Scientific Theory as an Historical Anomalyp. 210
Scientific Knowledge - Its Scope and Limits
Preface to Part Vp. 223
Is There (Scientific) Knowledge? Who Knows?p. 225
The Law of Quantity and Quality, or What Numbers Can and Can't Describep. 241
On Being in the Same Place at the Same Timep. 256
On a Circularity in Our Knowledge of the Physically Realp. 262
Truth and Presence: Poetic Imagination and Mathematical Physics in Gaston Bachelardp. 271
Science and Subjectivity
Preface to Part VIp. 285
Science, Surrealism, and the Status of the Subjectp. 289
Subjectivity in the Machinep. 299
Rethinking Intentionalityp. 318
Yorick's World, or the Universe in a Single Skullp. 332
A Case for the Human Sciencesp. 349
Notesp. 363
Notes on Sourcesp. 381
Indexp. 385
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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