Catalogue


Writing under tyranny [electronic resource] : English literature and the Henrician Reformation /
Greg Walker.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
description
x, 556 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0199283338, 9780199283330
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
isbn
0199283338
9780199283330
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8105502
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Greg Walker is Professor of Early-Modern Literature and Culture at the University of Leicester.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
Walker (Univ. of Leicester, UK) revisits his interest in Henrician government, extending previous studies of "reactions and resistance." In the first chapter, he sets up the convincing argument on which he builds the rest of his study: after a model kingship and provision of a relatively safe atmosphere at court, Henry VIII's politics concerning the "great matter" led him to tyranny. Writers with little in common except their attachment to the royal court and their alarm at Henry's new policies prompted a literary revolution. Walker posits that these writers struggled "to find a way of writing the self that could address political issues but would not provoke an abrupt and violent brush with authority." He discusses a diverse group: William Thynne, Sir Brian Tuke, and John Heywood (household servants), treated in part 1; Sir Thomas Elyot, in part 2; and Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, in part 3. Walker offers close and careful readings of these men's primary texts, contextualizing his exploration biographically, historically, and culturally. Grounded in solid research (evidenced by 106 pages of notes), this study makes a valuable contribution to the literature. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. S. Carducci Winona State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
...a monumental achievement that furthers our understanding of an area that Walker has done much to illuminate over the years...
A new book by Greg Walker ... is a major event.
A serious, scholarly and, in places, profound work, well written throughout.
Walker gives voice to a fascinating dialogue between literature and politics ... in a compelling work ... This is an actively engaging book, required reading for anyone interested in the relation between literature and politics, and a welcome addition to the ranks of intellectual history.
Walker's ability to invoke very specific points of reference in clarifying the contemporary significance of his texts is ... remarkable ... This is an important book, which deserves to have a profound influence upon the ways in which we understand the literature of the Henrician period.
Walker's readings invest the literature of the early sixteenth century with a complex political urgency that is more often associated with Elizabethan texts. This thoroughly researched and well-written book asks us to rethink the standard narrative of sixteenth-century literary history ... For scholars in the fields of literature and history, Writing under Tyranny is destined to become a classic.
Walker's strength is that he understands and engages intimately with the culture of a generation schooled in the rhetorical tradition ... Walker is a most acute critic of the literature of an age when most published writers were active politicians and most politicians were writers.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Greg Walker examines the impact of tyrannical government on the work of poets, playwrights and prose writers in the early English Renaissance.
Long Description
Writing Under Tyranny: English Literature and the Henrician Reformation spans the boundaries between literary studies and history. It looks at the impact of tyrannical government on the work of poets, playwrights, and prose writers of the early English Renaissance. It shows the profound effects that political oppression had on the literary production of the years from 1528 to 1547, and how English writers in turn strove to mitigate, redirect, and finally resist that oppression. The result was the destruction of a number of forms that had dominated the literary production of late-medieval England, but also the creation of new forms that were to dominate the writing of the following centuries. Paradoxically, the tyranny of Henry VIII gave birth to many modes of writing now seen to be characteristic of the English literary Renaissance.
Long Description
Writing Under Tyranny spans the boundaries between literary studies and history. It looks at the impact of tyrannical government on the work of poets, playwrights, and prose writers of the early English Renaissance. It shows the profound effects that political oppression had on the literary production of the years from 1528 to 1547, and how English writers in turn strove to mitigate, redirect, and finally resist that oppression. The result was the destruction of a number of forms that had dominated the literary production of late-medieval England, but also the creation of new forms that were to dominate the writing of the following centuries. Paradoxically, the tyranny of Henry VIII gave birth to many modes of writing now seen to be characteristic of the English literary Renaissance.
Main Description
Spanning the boundaries between literature and history, Writing Under Tyranny charts the profound effects that Henry VIII's increasingly tyrannical regime had on the literary production of the early sixteenth century, and shows how English writers strove to mitigate, redirect, and finally resist oppressive royal demands. The result was the destruction of a number of venerable literary forms and the collapse of a literary culture that dominated the late-medieval period, but also the birth of many modes of writing now seen as characteristic of the English literary renaissance. Book jacket.
Main Description
Writing Under Tyranny: English Literature and the Henrician Reformation spans the boundaries between literary studies and history. It looks at the impact of tyrannical government on the work of poets, playwrights, and prose writers of the early English Renaissance. It shows the profoundeffects that political oppression had on the literary production of the years from 1528 to 1547, and how English writers in turn strove to mitigate, redirect, and finally resist that oppression. The result was the destruction of a number of forms that had dominated the literary production oflate-medieval England, but also the creation of new forms that were to dominate the writing of the following centuries. Paradoxically, the tyranny of Henry VIII gave birth to many modes of writing now seen to be characteristic of the English literary Renaissance.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Long Divorce of Steelp. 5
Poetry and the Culture of Counsel: The 1532 Workes of Geffray Chaucer Newly Printed and John Heywood's Play of the Weather
A Gift for King Henry VIIIp. 29
The Signs of the Worldp. 36
Reading Chaucer in 1532p. 56
Thynne and Tuke's Apocryphap. 73
Mocking the Thunderp. 100
'To Virtue Persuaded'?: The Persistent Counsels of Sir Thomas Elyot
Sir Thomas Elyot and the King's Great Matterp. 123
The Book Named the Governorp. 141
Tyranny and the Conscience of Manp. 181
From Supremacy to Tyranny, 1533-40p. 225
The Apotheosis of Sir Thomas Elyotp. 240
The Death of Counsel: Sir Thomas Wyatt and Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
Sir Thomas Wyatt: Poetry and Politicsp. 279
Tyranny Condemnedp. 296
Wyatt's Embassy, Treason, and 'The Defence"p. 335
Pleading with Powerp. 351
'Wyatt Resteth Here'p. 377
Writing Under Tyrannyp. 414
Notesp. 433
Indexp. 539
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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