Catalogue


Women in the chemical workforce [electronic resource] : a workshop report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable /
Chemical Sciences Roundtable, Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, National Research Council.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, c2000.
description
xiii, 144 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
ISBN
030907293X, 9780309072939
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
geographic term
genre index term
More Details
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, March 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
For a period of history no women worked outside the home. Bust as years have gone by and society has changed, Women are working varying jobs every day. They are, however, underrepresented in some sectors of jobs. This includes women in the engineering and science fields. To matters worse, women do not ascend the career ladder as fast as or as far as men do. The impact of this and related problems for science, the academic enterprise, the U.S. economy, and global economic competitiveness have been recently examined. The Chemical Sciences Roundtable evaluate that the demographics of the workforce and the implications for science and society vary, depending on the field of science or engineering. The roundtable has organized a workshop, "Women in the Chemical Workforce," to address issues pertinent to the chemical and chemical engineering workforce as a whole, with an emphasis on the advancement of women. Women in the Chemical Workforce: A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable includes reports regarding the workshop's three sessions-Context and Overview, Opportunities for Change, and Conditions for Success-as well as presentations by invited speakers, discussions within breakout groups, oral reports from each group.
Main Description
For a period of history no women worked outside the home. Bust as years have gone by and society has changed, Women are working varying jobs every day. They are, however, underrepresented in some sectors of jobs. This includes women in the engineering and science fields. To matters worse, women do not ascend the career ladder as fast as or as far as men do. The impact of this and related problems for science, the academic enterprise, the U.S. economy, and global economic competitiveness have been recently examined. The Chemical Sciences Roundtable evaluate that the demographics of the workforce and the implications for science and society vary, depending on the field of science or engineering. The roundtable has organized a workshop, "Women in the Chemical Workforce," to address issues pertinent to the chemical and chemical engineering workforce as a whole, with an emphasis on the advancement of women. Women in the Chemical Workforce: A Workshop Report to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable includes reports regarding the workshop's three sessions--Context and Overview, Opportunities for Change, and Conditions for Success--as well as presentations by invited speakers, discussions within breakout groups, oral reports from each group.
Table of Contents
Summaryp. 1
1970-2000: A Less Than Golden Age for Women in Chemistry?p. 6
The Advancement of Women in Science and Engineeringp. 24
Workforce for the 21st Century: The Federal Perspectivep. 38
Reports from the Breakout Sessionsp. 50
An Oddity No Longer: Women Scientists in Industryp. 58
Title IX for Women in Academic Chemistry: Isn't a Millennium of Affirmative Action for White Men Sufficient?p. 74
Remarks for the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Dinnerp. 94
Reports from the Breakout Sessionsp. 100
Experience of Women at the Massachusetts Institute of Technologyp. 110
Reports from the Breakout Groupsp. 125
Appendixes
Workshop Participantsp. 137
Biographical Sketches of Workshop Speakersp. 140
Origin of and Information on the Chemical Sciences Roundtablep. 143
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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