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William Faulkner and the tangible past [electronic resource] : the architecture of Yoknapatawpha /
Thomas S. Hines.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
description
xiv, 164 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0520202937 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
isbn
0520202937 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8101723
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 153-156) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"This jewel of a book is a great pleasure to read. In point of fact, it is not a book one reads but savors."--Narciso G. Menocal, author ofArchitecture as Nature
Flap Copy
"This jewel of a book is a great pleasure to read. In point of fact, it is not a book one reads but savors."--Narciso G. Menocal, author of Architecture as Nature
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-08:
Hines (University of California, Los Angeles) has added a new twist on the typical architecture book. He examines writer William Faulkner's obsession with time and his use of architecture as a tangible link between past and present. Hines is the logical author for this book, as his previous works include Richard Neutra and the Search for Modern Architecture (CH, Nov'82). Following critic Ward Miner (The World of William Faulkner, 1952), Hines attempts to establish real Mississippi architecture as the prototype for fictional Jefferson and surrounding Yoknapatawpha County structures. In a powerful introduction, the reader is promised a comparative analysis between these worlds as well as how architecture symbolizes the moods and character composition of the fictional inhabitants. In this, Hines falls short. Chapters, organized by architectural style, begin with in-depth historical backgrounds and are laced with superb photographs, but text and cited quotes tend not to establish a firm link between the two worlds. A higher level of synthesis is imperative as the connection is too tenuous. The appendix is a further digression: a monologue on the Hines family and its connection with the Faulkners. Recommended solely as a source on Faulkner or regional Mississippi architecture. General; lower-division undergraduate. L. B. Sickels Taves; Northwestern State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 1997
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Summaries
Long Description
The world of William Faulkner is seen from a new perspective in Thomas Hines's imaginative and many-faceted study. Hines assesses the impact of the built environment on Faulkner's consciousness and shows how the architecture of the writer's fictional county of Yoknapatawpha reflects the actual architecture of Oxford, Mississippi, and neighboring areas. Over 110 distinctive photographs, in both color and black-and-white, beautifully complement the text, making this book both a reading and viewing pleasure. Much has been written on the role of nature in Faulkner's work, but architecture and the built environment--the opposite of nature--have been virtually ignored. Arguing that nature and architecture are of equal importance in Faulkner's cosmos, Hines examines the writer's use of architectural modes--primitive, classical, gothic, and modern--to demarcate caste and class, to convey mood and ambience, and to delineate character. Hines provides not only another way of understanding Faulkner's work but also a means of appreciating the power of architecture to reflect what Faulkner called "the comedy and tragedy of being alive." Hines's gifts as an architectural historian and photographer and his intimate knowledge of Faulkner country are evident throughout this handsome book. Combining cultural, intellectual, architectural, and literary history,William Faulkner and the Tangible Pastwill take Faulkner lovers, as well as lovers of architecture, on a fascinating tour of Yoknapatawpha County.
Main Description
The world of William Faulkner is seen from a new perspective in Thomas Hines's imaginative and many-faceted study. Hines assesses the impact of the built environment on Faulkner's consciousness and shows how the architecture of the writer's fictional county of Yoknapatawpha reflects the actual architecture of Oxford, Mississippi, and neighboring areas. Over 110 distinctive photographs, in both color and black-and-white, beautifully complement the text, making this book both a reading and viewing pleasure. Much has been written on the role of nature in Faulkner's work, but architecture and the built environment--the opposite of nature--have been virtually ignored. Arguing that nature and architecture are of equal importance in Faulkner's cosmos, Hines examines the writer's use of architectural modes--primitive, classical, gothic, and modern--to demarcate caste and class, to convey mood and ambience, and to delineate character. Hines provides not only another way of understanding Faulkner's work but also a means of appreciating the power of architecture to reflect what Faulkner called "the comedy and tragedy of being alive." Hines's gifts as an architectural historian and photographer and his intimate knowledge of Faulkner country are evident throughout this handsome book. Combining cultural, intellectual, architectural, and literary history, William Faulkner and the Tangible Pastwill take Faulkner lovers, as well as lovers of architecture, on a fascinating tour of Yoknapatawpha County.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Preface
Introduction: "Time and Its Furniture"p. 1
"The Purlieus of Elegance": The Development of Faulkner's Architectural Consciousnessp. 6
"A Just and Holy Cause": The Public Sculpture of Yoknapatawphap. 16
"Of Secret and Violent Blood": The Indian Mounds of Yoknapatawphap. 21
"Alien Yet Inviolably Durable": The Folk Architecture of Yoknapatawphap. 24
"The Aspirations and the Hopes": The Greek Revival of Yoknapatawphap. 45
"Immolated Sticks and Stones": The Gothic Revival and Its Kindred Modesp. 75
"A Kind of Majesty": The Postbellum Architecture of Victorian Yoknapatawphap. 88
"Spacious, Suave, Sonorous, and Monastic": The Modernist Architecture of Yoknapatawphap. 103
Conclusion: "Each in Its Ordered Place"p. 122
Appendix: A Letter to My Sonp. 128
Notesp. 148
Selected Bibliographyp. 153
Illustration Creditsp. 157
Indexp. 158
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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