Catalogue


A twentieth-century history of United States population /
Russell O. Wright.
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 1996.
description
xx, 203 p. : ill.
ISBN
0810831821 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 1996.
isbn
0810831821 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
809397
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
...this compact volume makes a valuable reference for its subject for any level of readership.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The census has been providing valuable information to government and industry since it first began in the 1700s. In this book, Russell O. Wright takes a new look at census data from 1900 through 1990-a look that encompasses not just how many people were living in which city at what time, but what those numbers say about the past, present, and future of the United States. By compiling and comparing population data for each region, state, and major city within the U.S., Wright provides unique insight into the geographic, economic, social, and political factors that have shaped the country. He compares the growth of the states and the largest cities to the overall growth of the nation, to see which grew slower, and by how much. He also uses the data to project what will happen-statistically and politically-through the year 2050. Throughout the book, information is presented in easy-to-read charts and tables which are accompanied by concise explanatory materials. Data are arranged by region, state and city for quick access. States and cities are also shown in ranked order, enabling the researcher to find data based on relative population.
Main Description
The census has been providing valuable information to government and industry since it first began in the 1700s. In this book, Russell O. Wright takes a new look at census data from 1900 through 1990--a look that encompasses not just how many people were living in which city at what time, but what those numbers say about the past, present, and future of the United States. Information is presented in easy-to-read charts, and tables with concise explanatory materials.
Long Description
The census has been providing valuable information to government and industry since it first began in the 1700s. In this book, Russell O. Wright takes a new look at census data from 1900 through 1990--a look that encompasses not just how many people were living in which city at what time, but what those numbers say about the past, present, and future of the United States. By compiling and comparing population data for each region, state, and major city within the U.S., Wright provides unique insight into the geographic, economic, social, and political factors that have shaped the country. He compares the growth of the states and the largest cities to the overall growth of the nation, to see which grew slower, and by how much. He also uses the data to project what will happen--statistically and politically--through the year 2050. Throughout the book, information is presented in easy-to-read charts and tables which are accompanied by concise explanatory materials. Data are arranged by region, state and city for quick access. States and cities are also shown in ranked order, enabling the researcher to find data based on relative population.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Nationp. 1
National Profilep. 2
The Sunbeltp. 4
The Regionsp. 7
Regions Profilep. 8
Regions vs. Nationp. 18
The Statesp. 27
States Profilep. 28
States vs. Nationp. 30
States Summaryp. 132
The Citiesp. 139
Cities Profilep. 140
Cities vs. Nationp. 142
Cities Summaryp. 190
The Futurep. 197
Population Projectionsp. 198
Political Implicationsp. 202
About the Authorp. 204
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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