Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Urban revolt [electronic resource] : ethnic politics in the nineteenth-century Chicago labor movement /
Eric L. Hirsch.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
description
xvii, 253 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520065859 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
isbn
0520065859 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
8093401
 
Bibliography: p. 221-235.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1990-10:
In this systematically argued work of historical sociology, Hirsch uses the experiences of the labor movement in 19th-century Chicago to advance a theoretical argument about mass mobilization and social change. Hirsch claims that the ethnic segmentation of the Chicago labor force encouraged the formation of ethnically distinct neighborhood, shop floor, and cultural "havens" that served as strategically important sites of social contestation. He argues that urbanization and industrialization led to the formation of "close-knit, ethnically homogeneous urban communities" that paradoxically enough gave rise to militant revolutionary movements, but at the same time confined those movements to a minority of the working class. Hirsch's concluding chapter is a particularly effective and useful survey of sociological theory about protest movements and political mobilization. As is often the case within historical sociology, it will be likely to prove more satisfying to sociologists than to social historians, more useful as theory-building about the present than as reconstruction and interpretation of social life in the past. Yet Hirsch makes major contributions to understanding social protest in a country where ethnic segmentation of the work force is both the primary source of oppositional activity and its dominant constraint. College and university libraries. -G. Lipsitz, University of Minnesota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1990
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Urban Revolt is a careful, incisive reexamination of the most highly mobilized urban revolutionary force in American history--the late nineteenth-century Chicago labor movement. By documenting the importance of ethnic origins in accounting for political choice, Eric L. Hirsch completely reconceptualizes the dynamics of urban social movements. Hirsch links the industrialization of Chicago to the development and maintenance of an ethnically segmented labor market. Urbanization, he argues, fostered ethnic enclaves whose inhabitants were channeled into particular kinds of jobs and excluded from others. Hirsch then demonstrates the political implications of emergent ethnic identities and communities. In the late nineteenth century, Chicagoans of German background--denied economic power by Anglo-Americans' control of craft unions and excluded from political influence by Irish-dominated political machines--formulated radical critiques of the status quo and devised innovative political strategies. In contrast, the Irish revolutionary movement in Chicago targeted the oppressive British political system; Irish activists saw no reason to overthrow a Chicago polity that brought them political and economic upward mobility. Urban Revolt gives a new perspective on revolutionary mobilization by de-emphasizing the importance of class consciousness, social disorganization, and bureaucracy. In his original and provocative focus on the importance of ethnicity in accounting for political choice, Hirsch makes a valuable contribution to the study of social movements, race, and working-class politics.
Long Description
Urban Revoltis a careful, incisive reexamination of the most highly mobilized urban revolutionary force in American history--the late nineteenth-century Chicago labor movement. By documenting the importance of ethnic origins in accounting for political choice, Eric L. Hirsch completely reconceptualizes the dynamics of urban social movements. Hirsch links the industrialization of Chicago to the development and maintenance of an ethnically segmented labor market. Urbanization, he argues, fostered ethnic enclaves whose inhabitants were channeled into particular kinds of jobs and excluded from others. Hirsch then demonstrates the political implications of emergent ethnic identities and communities. In the late nineteenth century, Chicagoans of German background--denied economic power by Anglo-Americans' control of craft unions and excluded from political influence by Irish-dominated political machines--formulated radical critiques of the status quo and devised innovative political strategies. In contrast, the Irish revolutionary movement in Chicago targeted the oppressive British political system; Irish activists saw no reason to overthrow a Chicago polity that brought them political and economic upward mobility. Urban Revoltgives a new perspective on revolutionary mobilization by de-emphasizing the importance of class consciousness, social disorganization, and bureaucracy. In his original and provocative focus on the importance of ethnicity in accounting for political choice, Hirsch makes a valuable contribution to the study of social movements, race, and working-class politics.
Unpaid Annotation
"Urban Revolt is a careful, incisive reexamination of the most highly mobilized urban revolutionary force in American history--the late nineteenth-century Chicago labor movement. By documenting the importance of ethnic origins in accounting for political choice, Eric L. Hirsch completely reconceptualizes the dynamics of urban social movements.Hirsch links the industrialization of Chicago to the development and maintenance of an ethnically segmented labor market. Urbanization, he argues, fostered ethnic enclaves whose inhabitants were channeled into particular kinds of jobs and excluded from others. Hirsch then demonstrates the political implications of emergent ethnic identities and communities.In the late nineteenth century, Chicagoans of German background--denied economic power by Anglo-Americans' control of craft unions and excluded from political influence by Irish-dominated political machines--formulated radical critiques of the status quo and devised innovative political strategies. In contrast, the Irish revolutionary movement in Chicago targeted the oppressive British political system; Irish activists saw no reason to overthrow a Chicago polity that brought them political and economic upward mobility."Urban Revolt gives a new perspective on revolutionary mobilization by de-emphasizing the importance of class consciousness, social disorganization, and bureaucracy. In his original and provocative focus on the importance of ethnicity in accountin

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem