Catalogue


In hope of liberty : culture, community, and protest among northern free Blacks, 1700-1860 /
James Oliver Horton, Lois E. Horton.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
description
xii, 340 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
019504732X (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
isbn
019504732X (acid-free paper)
catalogue key
809299
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 271-323) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"James and Lois Horton have used superb scholarship to pierce the mists shrouding the first generations of blacks on these shores and have delivered a sharp portrait of some of the earliest and strongest Americans. This is a profound work of the utmost importance to anyone who wants to understand the United States and her people."--Roger Wilkins, Clarence J. Robinson Professor of History and American Culture, George Mason University"This is really a fascinating study. On one level, it is a superb synthesis of three decades of scholarship on Northern Blacks in slavery and freedom. If that were all the book was, it would be a valuable contribution to the field. However, the Hortons take their study much further, pulling together material from many disciplines to illuminate the lives of Northern men and women of color. We have the chance, however briefly, to enter into the lives of thesepeople, and see through their eyes their struggle to be free, to achieve personal fulfillment, to be part of a community, and to carve out for themselves and their children a place in a society that was never reconciled to their presence."--Julie Winch, History Department, University of Massachusetts,Boston"In Hope of Liberty is a stunning achievement of research, insight, and an inclusive historical vision. The Hortons give us the free black experience from 1700 to the Civil War in what will become the standard, synthetic work on the subject. Told with an artful combination of irony, economy, and original description of people and events, this story of the origin and persistence of black communities richly demonstrates how much black history belongs inthe central narrative of American history. This book will surprise and enlighten a broad readership."--David W. Blight, Associate Professor of History, Amherst College"This important book is first-rate and tells great stories of the first group of free African Americans, people known and unknown, who struggled mightily to bridge cultures. It reads very well, and it covers both a large chronology, from the colonial period into the Civil War, and a large area, the North of the United States. In Hope of Liberty is destined to take its place among a pantheon of illustrious works on race relations."--Orville VernonBurton, Professor of History and Sociology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign"In Hope of Liberty presents an excellent examination of northern free black life from the early arrivals in the transatlantic slave trade to the coming of the Civil War. The studies of various individuals and of the roles of family, church, and antislavery activities demonstrate the accomplishments of blacks in circumstances of racial injustice. This is an important contribution to the study of black and American history."--Stanley L. Engerman,Professor of Economics and History, University of Rochester
"This is really a fascinating study. On one level, it is a superb synthesis of three decades of scholarship on Northern Blacks in slavery and freedom. If that were all the book was, it would be a valuable contribution to the field. However, the Hortons take their study much further, pullingtogether material from many disciplines to illuminate the lives of Northern men and women of color. We have the chance, however briefly, to enter into the lives of these people, and see through their eyes their struggle to be free, to achieve personal fulfillment, to be part of a community, and tocarve out for themselves and their children a place in a society that was never reconciled to their presence."--Julie Winch, History Department, University of Massachusetts, Boston
"This is really a fascinating study. On one level, it is a superbsynthesis of three decades of scholarship on Northern Blacks in slavery andfreedom. If that were all the book was, it would be a valuable contribution tothe field. However, the Hortons take their study much further, pulling togethermaterial from many disciplines to illuminate the lives of Northern men and womenof color. We have the chance, however briefly, to enter into the lives of thesepeople, and see through their eyes their struggle to be free, to achievepersonal fulfillment, to be part of a community, and to carve out for themselvesand their children a place in a society that was never reconciled to theirpresence."--Julie Winch, History Department, University of Massachusetts,Boston
"James and Lois Horton have used superb scholarship to pierce the mistsshrouding the first generations of blacks on these shores and have delivered asharp portrait of some of the earliest and strongest Americans. This is aprofound work of the utmost importance to anyone who wants to understand theUnited States and her people."--Roger Wilkins, Clarence J. Robinson Professor ofHistory and American Culture, George Mason University
"This important book is first-rate and tells great stories of the first group of free African Americans, people known and unknown, who struggled mightily to bridge cultures. It reads very well, and it covers both a large chronology, from the colonial period into the Civil War, and a largearea, the North of the United States. In Hope of Liberty is destined to take its place among a pantheon of illustrious works on race relations."--Orville Vernon Burton, Professor of History and Sociology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
"This important book is first-rate and tells great stories of the firstgroup of free African Americans, people known and unknown, who struggledmightily to bridge cultures. It reads very well, and it covers both a largechronology, from the colonial period into the Civil War, and a large area, theNorth of the United States. In Hope of Liberty is destined to take its placeamong a pantheon of illustrious works on race relations."--Orville VernonBurton, Professor of History and Sociology, University of Illinois,Urbana-Champaign
"In Hope of Liberty presents an excellent examination of northern freeblack life from the early arrivals in the transatlantic slave trade to thecoming of the Civil War. The studies of various individuals and of the roles offamily, church, and antislavery activities demonstrate the accomplishments ofblacks in circumstances of racial injustice. This is an important contributionto the study of black and American history."--Stanley L. Engerman, Professor ofEconomics and History, University of Rochester
"James and Lois Horton have used superb scholarship to pierce the mists shrouding the first generations of blacks on these shores and have delivered a sharp portrait of some of the earliest and strongest Americans. This is a profound work of the utmost importance to anyone who wants tounderstand the United States and her people."--Roger Wilkins, Clarence J. Robinson Professor of History and American Culture, George Mason University
"In Hope of Liberty presents an excellent examination of northern free black life from the early arrivals in the transatlantic slave trade to the coming of the Civil War. The studies of various individuals and of the roles of family, church, and antislavery activities demonstrate theaccomplishments of blacks in circumstances of racial injustice. This is an important contribution to the study of black and American history."--Stanley L. Engerman, Professor of Economics and History, University of Rochester
"In Hope of Liberty is a stunning achievement of research, insight, and an inclusive historical vision. The Hortons give us the free black experience from 1700 to the Civil War in what will become the standard, synthetic work on the subject. Told with an artful combination of irony, economy,and original description of people and events, this story of the origin and persistence of black communities richly demonstrates how much black history belongs in the central narrative of American history. This book will surprise and enlighten a broad readership."--David W. Blight, AssociateProfessor of History, Amherst College
"In Hope of Liberty is a stunning achievement of research, insight, and aninclusive historical vision. The Hortons give us the free black experience from1700 to the Civil War in what will become the standard, synthetic work on thesubject. Told with an artful combination of irony, economy, and originaldescription of people and events, this story of the origin and persistence ofblack communities richly demonstrates how much black history belongs in thecentral narrative of American history. This book will surprise and enlighten abroad readership."--David W. Blight, Associate Professor of History, AmherstCollege
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Summaries
Main Description
In the unsettled days of the early United States, the protests of angryfarmers, led by Daniel Shays, threatened to close down the local courts inwestern Massachusetts. Prince Hall, a black veteran of the American Revolution,volunteered to lead a troop of 700 Boston area blacks to put down the rebellion.Massachusetts officials, although short on both funds and men, refused the offerand turned instead to wealthy white merchants. Hall may have been both insultedand disappointed, but was probably not surprised. Free blacks in the antebellumNorth had greater economic opportunities, political rights, and social freedomsthan their enslaved southern brethren, but still often faced fear, distrust, andoutright racism from the whites they lived among. The lives of these strugglingmen and women, the first free blacks in America, are vividly described in InHope of Liberty, spanning the 200 years and eight generations from the colonialslave trade through the American Revolution to, finally, the Civil War.In this marvelously peopled history, James and Lois Horton introduce us to arich cast of characters. There are familiar historical figures such as CrispusAttucks, a leader of the Boston Massacre and one of the first casualties of theAmerican Revolution; Sojourner Truth, the eloquent anti-slavery and women'srights activist whose own family had been separated at a slave auction block;and Prince Whipple, George Washington's aide, easily recognizable in theportrait of Washington crossing the Delaware River. And there are the countlessmen and women who struggled to lead their daily lives with courage and dignity:Zilpha Elaw, a visionary revivalist who preached before crowds of thousands;David James Peck, the first black to graduate from an American medical school in1848; Paul Cuffe, a successful seafaring merchant who became an ardent supporterof the black African colonization movement; and Nancy Vose, at eighteen theeffective head of a scattered household of four siblings, each boarded indifferent homes.In a seamless narrative weaving together all these stories and more, theHortons describe the complex networks, both formal and informal, that made upfree black society, from the black churches, which provided a sense of communityand served as a breeding ground for black leaders and political action, to thecountless newspapers which spoke eloquently of their aspirations for blacks andtheir active role in the anti-slavery movement, to the informal networks whichallowed far-flung families to maintain contact, and which provided support andaid to needy members of the free black community and to fugitives from theSouth. Finally, they describe the vital role of the black family, thecornerstone of this tightly-knit community.In Hope of Liberty brilliantly illuminates the free black community of theantebellum North as it struggled to assimilate while maintaining a uniquecultural identity, and to work for social action in an atmosphere of racialinjustice. As the black community today still struggles with many of the sameproblems, this insightful history reminds us how far we have come, and how farwe have yet to go.
Main Description
In the unsettled days of the early United States, the protests of angry farmers, led by Daniel Shays, threatened to close down the local courts in western Massachusetts. Prince Hall, a black veteran of the American Revolution, volunteered to lead a troop of 700 Boston area blacks to put downthe rebellion. Massachusetts officials, although short on both funds and men, refused the offer and turned instead to wealthy white merchants. Hall may have been both insulted and disappointed, but was probably not surprised. Free blacks in the antebellum North had greater economic opportunities,political rights, and social freedoms than their enslaved southern brethren, but still often faced fear, distrust, and outright racism from the whites they lived among. The lives of these struggling men and women, the first free blacks in America, are vividly described in In Hope of Liberty,spanning the 200 years and eight generations from the colonial slave trade through the American Revolution to, finally, the Civil War. In this marvelously peopled history, James and Lois Horton introduce us to a rich cast of characters. There are familiar historical figures such as Crispus Attucks, a leader of the Boston Massacre and one of the first casualties of the American Revolution; Sojourner Truth, the eloquent anti-slaveryand women's rights activist whose own family had been separated at a slave auction block; and Prince Whipple, George Washington's aide, easily recognizable in the portrait of Washington crossing the Delaware River. And there are the countless men and women who struggled to lead their daily liveswith courage and dignity: Zilpha Elaw, a visionary revivalist who preached before crowds of thousands; David James Peck, the first black to graduate from an American medical school in 1848; Paul Cuffe, a successful seafaring merchant who became an ardent supporter of the black African colonizationmovement; and Nancy Vose, at eighteen the effective head of a scattered household of four siblings, each boarded in different homes. In a seamless narrative weaving together all these stories and more, the Hortons describe the complex networks, both formal and informal, that made up free black society, from the black churches, which provided a sense of community and served as a breeding ground for black leaders and politicalaction, to the countless newspapers which spoke eloquently of their aspirations for blacks and their active role in the anti-slavery movement, to the informal networks which allowed far-flung families to maintain contact, and which provided support and aid to needy members of the free blackcommunity and to fugitives from the South. Finally, they describe the vital role of the black family, the cornerstone of this tightly-knit community. In Hope of Liberty brilliantly illuminates the free black community of the antebellum North as it struggled to assimilate while maintaining a unique cultural identity, and to work for social action in an atmosphere of racial injustice. As the black community today still struggles with many of thesame problems, this insightful history reminds us how far we have come, and how far we have yet to go.
Long Description
Prince Hall, a black veteran of the American Revolution, was insulted and disappointed but probably not surprised when white officials refused his offer of help. He had volunteered a troop of 700 Boston area blacks to help quell a rebellion of western Massachusetts farmers led by Daniel Shays during the economic turmoil in the uncertain period following independence. Many African Americans had fought for America's liberty and their own in the Revolution, but their place in the new nation was unresolved. As slavery was abolished in the North, free blacks gained greater opportunities, but still faced a long struggle against limits to their freedom, against discrimination, and against southern slavery. The lives of these men and women are vividly described in In Hope of Liberty, spanning the 200 years and eight generations from the colonial slave trade to the Civil War. In this marvelously peopled history, James and Lois Horton introduce us to a rich cast of characters. There are familiar historical figures such as Crispus Attucks, a leader of the Boston Massacre and one of the first casualties of the American Revolution; Sojourner Truth, former slave and eloquent antislavery and women's rights activist whose own family had been broken by slavery when her son became a wedding present for her owner's daughter; and Prince Whipple, George Washington's aide, easily recognizable in the portrait of Washington crossing the Delaware River. And there are the countless men and women who struggled to lead their daily lives with courage and dignity: Zilpha Elaw, a visionary revivalist who preached before crowds of thousands; David James Peck, the first black to graduate from an American medical school in 1848; Paul Cuffe, a successful seafaring merchant who became an ardent supporter of the black African colonization movement; and Nancy Prince, at eighteen the effective head of a scattered household of four siblings, each boarded in different homes, who at twenty-five was formally presented to the Russian court. In a seamless narrative weaving together all these stories and more, the Hortons describe the complex networks, both formal and informal, that made up free black society, from the black churches, which provided a sense of community and served as a training ground for black leaders and political action, to the countless newspapers which spoke eloquently of their aspirations for blacks and played an active role in the antislavery movement, to the informal networks which allowed far-flung families to maintain contact, and which provided support and aid to needy members of the free black community and to fugitives from the South. Finally, they describe the vital role of the black family, the cornerstone of this variegated and tightly knit community In Hope of Liberty brilliantly illuminates the free black communities of the antebellum North as they struggled to reconcile conflicting cultural identities and to work for social change in an atmosphere of racial injustice. As the black community today still struggles with many of the same problems, this insightful history reminds us how far we have come, and how far we have yet to go.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. v
Introductionp. ix
Slavery and Slave Trading in the Colonial Northp. 3
Culture, Race, and Class in the Colonial Northp. 30
Revolution and the Abolition of Northern Slaveryp. 55
A Life in Freedom: the Evolution of Family and Householdp. 77
Coping with Urban Life: Poverty, Work, and Regional Differencesp. 101
Sustaining and Serving the Community Building Institutions for Social and Spiritual Welfarep. 125
Culture, Politics, and the Issue of African-American Identityp. 155
Ambivalent Identity: Colonization and the Question of Emigrationp. 177
The Growth of the Antebellum Antislavery Movementp. 203
The Widening Struggle, Growing Militancy, and the Hope of Liberty for Allp. 237
Epiloguep. 269
Notesp. 271
Indexp. 325
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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