Catalogue


Transforming settler states [electronic resource] : communal conflict and internal security in Northern Ireland and Zimbabwe /
Ronald Weitzer.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
description
xiv, 278 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520064909 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1990.
isbn
0520064909 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8086682
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-267) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1991-06:
This is a study of the coercive apparatuses of two settler states, Zimbabwe and Northern Ireland, which are "communally divided," or rent among political, social, religous, or ethnic lines. After examining the rise and breakdown of these two settler states, Weitzer uses his two case studies to propose an explanatory model for understanding the development of state security systems after the end of settler rule. Weitzer's empahsis on the centrality of state security systems to the maintenance of settler rule, and especially to the process of political change after such states collapse, is especially welcome. Indeed, his thorough empirical work, marshaled in support of this claim, is likely to spark others to rethink the importance of transformed state security systems in the larger process of political change following settler rule. The explanatory model Weitzer proposes may well be a useful heuristic device for understanding the various considerations that inform the structure of security arrangements, but its applicability to other such states is somewhat less obvious than Weitzer claims. In sum, this is an important addition to several literatures, and the understanding of the processes of political change in settler states. Highly recommended for graduate students and faculty. -J. E. Finn, Wesleyan University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 1991
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Summaries
Long Description
In the past two decades, several settler regimes have collapsed and others seem increasingly vulnerable. This study examines the rise and demise of two settler states with particular emphasis on the role of repressive institutions of law and order. Drawing on field research in Northern Ireland and Zimbabwe, Ronald Weitzer traces developments in internal security structures before and after major political transitions. He concludes that thoroughgoing transformation of a repressive security apparatus seems to be an essential, but often overlooked, precondition for genuine democracy. In an instructive comparative analysis, Weitzer points out the divergent development of initially similar governmental systems. For instance, since independence in 1980, the government of Zimbabwe has retained and fortified basic features of the legal and organizational machinery of control inherited from the white Rhodesian state, and has used this apparatus to neutralize obstacles to the installation of a one-party state. In contrast, though liberalization is far from complete. The British government has succeeded in reforming important features of the old security system since the abrupt termination of Protestant, Unionist rule in Northern Ireland in 1972. The study makes a novel contribution to the scholarly literature on transitions from authoritarianism to democracy in its fresh emphasis on the pivotal role of police, military, and intelligence agencies in shaping political developments.
Unpaid Annotation
In the past two decades, several settler regimes have collapsed and others seem increasingly vulnerable. This study examines the rise and demise of two settler states with particular emphasis on the role of repressive institutions of law and order. Drawing on field research in Northern Ireland and Zimbabwe, Ronald Weitzer traces developments in internal security structures before and after major political transitions. He concludes that thoroughgoing transformation of a repressive security apparatus seems to be an essential, but often overlooked, precondition for genuine democracy.In an instructive comparative analysis, Weitzer points out the divergent development of initially similar governmental systems. For instance, since independence in 1980, the government of Zimbabwe has retained and fortified basic features of the legal and organizational machinery of control inherited from the white Rhodesian state, and has used this apparatus to neutralize obstacles to the installation of a one-party state. In contrast, though liberalization is far from complete. The British government has succeeded in reforming important features of the old security system since the abrupt termination of Protestant, Unionist rule in Northern Ireland in 1972. The study makes a novel contribution to the scholarly literature on transitions from authoritarianism to democracy in its fresh emphasis on the pivotal role of police, military, and intelligence agencies in shaping political d

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