Catalogue


The tradition of free trade [electronic resource] /
Lars Magnusson.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
description
xiv, 194 p.
ISBN
0415262151
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 2004.
isbn
0415262151
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8086076
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [158]-189)and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2005
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
In the nineteenth century Adam Smith and others gradually invented a 'tradition' of free trade. This was a towering achievement and has proved to be influential to this day. This book examines this construction of the free trade tradition. Showing how historical contruction is a vital component in the writing of doctrinal history, Lars Magnusson argues that it is important for historians of economic thought to distance themselves from the practice of writing history backwards. Contrasting what occurred in Britain in the nineteenth century with what occurred in the United States and in Sweden, this book shows that perhaps the classical tradition meant something else entirely in different national contexts. This original and thought-provoking book is written such that it will be of great interest not only to historians specializing in economic thought, but also historians with other areas of interest.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Investigation of the invention of 'free trade versus protectionism' debate in the nineteenth century is the aim of this new book. Lars Magnusson looks at how the ideas of Smith and Ricardo and the classical economists were interpreted by later writers in Britain, Sweden and America.
Main Description
In the nineteenth century Adam Smith and others gradually invented a 'tradition' of free trade. This was a towering achievement and has proved to be influential to this day. This book examines this construction of the free trade tradition. Showing how historical construction is a vital component in the writing of doctrinal history, Lars Magnusson argues that it is important for historians of economic thought to distance themselves from the practice of writing history backwards. Contrasting what occurred in Britain in the nineteenth century with what occurred in the United States and in Sweden, this book shows that perhaps the classical tradition meant something else entirely in different national contexts. This original and thought-provoking book is written such that it will be of great interest not only to historians specializing in economic thought, but also historians with other areas of interest.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
The invention of a tradition of free trade: an introductionp. 1
A historical reading of the history of economicsp. 4
The use and diffusion of economic languagep. 14
The heritage from Smith and classical political economyp. 20
Adam Smith as a system builderp. 27
The historical Smithp. 30
The real classical economistsp. 36
The invention of a tradition: from the Corn Laws to the fair trade controversyp. 46
The Christian moralist - and othersp. 53
Manchester uses of Adam Smithp. 57
Popular economicsp. 61
The fair trade debatep. 64
The historical construction of mercantilismp. 70
Mercantilismp. 72
Adam Smith's mercantile system todayp. 74
The historical construction of a conceptp. 78
Manchester and the mercantile systemp. 82
The role of mercantilism in nineteenth-century economic thoughtp. 90
The American systemp. 92
The other face of American political economyp. 94
Henry C. Careyp. 100
John Raep. 104
The American systemp. 106
Free-traders in the Antebellum Southp. 113
After the Civil Warp. 116
The three systems of political economy: a Swedish case of translationp. 123
Early economics in Swedenp. 126
Physiocracy in Swedenp. 130
Smith, Sweden and the industrial systemp. 140
Epiloguep. 152
Notesp. 158
Select bibliographyp. 178
Indexp. 190
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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