Catalogue


Toxicology and environmental health information resources [electronic resource] : the role of the National Library of Medicine /
Catharyn T. Liverman ... [et al.], editors ; Committee on Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Resources for Health Professionals, Division of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, c1997.
description
x, 160 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0309056861
format(s)
Book
Holdings
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
SciTech Book News, June 1997
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
The environment is increasingly recognized as having a powerful effect on human and ecological health, as well as on specific types of human morbidity, mortality, and disability. While the public relies heavily on federal and state regulatory agencies for protection from exposures to hazardous substances, it often looks to health professionals for information about routes of exposure and the nature and extent of associated adverse health consequences. However, most health professionals acquire only a minimal knowledge of toxicology during their education and training. In 1967 the National Library of Medicine (NLM) created an information resource, known today as the Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP). In 1995 the NLM asked the Institute of Medicine to examine the accessiblity and utility of the TEHIP databases for the work of health professionals. This resulting volume contains chapters on TEHIP and other toxicology and environmental health databases, on understanding the toxicology and environmental health information needs of health professionals, on increasing awareness of information resources through training and outreach, on accessing and navigating the TEHIP databases, and on program issues and future directions.
Main Description
The environment is increasingly recognized as having a powerful effect on human and ecological health, as well as on specific types of human morbidity, mortality, and disability. While the public relies heavily on federal and state regulatory agencies for protection from exposures to hazardous substances, it often looks to health professionals for information about routes of exposure and the nature and extent of associated adverse health consequences. However, most health professionals acquire only a minimal knowledge of toxicology during their education and training.In 1967 the National Library of Medicine (NLM) created an information resource, known today as the Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP). In 1995 the NLM asked the Institute of Medicine to examine the accessibility and utility of the TEHIP databases for the work of health professionals.This resulting volume contains chapters on TEHIP and other toxicology and environmental health databases, on understanding the toxicology and environmental health information needs of health professionals, on increasing awareness of information resources through training and outreach, on accessing and navigating the TEHIP databases, and on program issues and future directions.
Table of Contents
Executive Summaryp. 1
Introductionp. 11
The National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Programp. 19
Other Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Resourcesp. 55
Understanding the Information Needs of Health Professionalsp. 69
Increasing Awareness: Training and Outreachp. 87
Accessing and Navigating the TEHIP Databasesp. 101
Program Issues and Future Directionsp. 119
Glossary and Acronymsp. 131
App. A: Acknowledgmentsp. 143
App. B: Questionnairep. 145
Work on Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Resources: Agenda, Participants, and Summary of Focus Group Discussionsp. 153
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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