Catalogue


The three Yugoslavias [electronic resource] : state-building and legitimation, 1918-2005 /
Sabrina P. Ramet.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Woodrow Wilson Center Press ; Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, c2006.
description
xxvi, 817 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0253346568 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780253346568
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Woodrow Wilson Center Press ; Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, c2006.
isbn
0253346568 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780253346568
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8083983
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 747-774) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-04-01:
Ramet (Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology) is a distinguished leading scholar on Yugoslavia who has made important contributions to the substantial literature on that unhappy land. This first-rate volume is a substantially enlarged, rewritten edition of Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia, 1962-1991 (CH, Feb'93, 30-3476). It is a must read posing big questions, e.g., why Yugoslavs have repeatedly failed to create an effective legitimate state structure and rule of law. Ramet rejects the myth, unfortunately widespread in the West, that the driving force has been ethnic conflict and ancient hatreds. Her work complements the study by V. P. Gagnon Jr., The Myth of Ethnic War: Serbia and Croatia in the 1990s (CH, Sep'05, 43-0597), by focusing on elite behavior. While she looks at prior state-building efforts (1918-29), she concentrates chiefly on Tito's Yugoslavia. Nearly half of this thick volume covers the post-1989 period through KFOR and Kosovo. The inclusion of 150 pages of notes and more than 25 pages of bibliography underscore the deep research of this work, which concludes with a short chapter on the separate paths of Slovenia, Macedonia, and Croatia. Ramet throws much light on "three Yugoslavias" and also helps readers think about similar events elsewhere. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. H. Steck SUNY College at Cortland
Reviews
Review Quotes
... a must read posing big questions...
"... a must read posing big questions..." -- Choice
"... a must read posing big questions..." -Choice
... This is a rich and powerful book.... The product of twenty years of detailed research and contemplation, Ramet's latest work takes a rightful place on the short list of essential reading about the Yugoslavias.
"... This is a rich and powerful book.... The product of twenty years of detailed research and contemplation, Ramet's latest work takes a rightful place on the short list of essential reading about the Yugoslavias." -- Journal of Modern History
"... This is a rich and powerful book.... The product of twenty years of detailed research and contemplation, Ramet's latest work takes a rightful place on the short list of essential reading about the Yugoslavias." -Journal of Modern History
Ramet (Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology) is a distinguished leading scholar on Yugoslavia who has made important contributions to the substantial literature on that unhappy land. This first-rate volume is a substantially enlarged, rewritten edition of Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia, 1962, 1991 (CH, Feb'93, 30 -- 3476). It is a must read posing big questions, e.g., why Yugoslavs have repeatedly failed to create an effective legitimate state structure and rule of law. Ramet rejects the myth, unfortunately widespread in the West, that the driving force has been ethnic conflict and ancient hatreds. Her work complements the study by V. P. Gagnon Jr., The Myth of Ethnic War: Serbia and Croatia in the 1990s (CH, Sep'05, 43 -- 0597), by focusing on elite behavior. While she looks at prior state -- building efforts (1918 -- 29), she concentrates chiefly on Tito's Yugoslavia. Nearly half of this thick volume covers the post, 1989 period through KFOR and Kosovo. The inclusion of 150 pages of notes and more than 25 pages of bibliography underscore the deep research of this work, which concludes with a short chapter on the separate paths of Slovenia, Macedonia, and Croatia. Ramet throws much light on three Yugoslavias and also helps readers think about similar events elsewhere. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower -- division undergraduates through faculty. -- H. Steck, SUNY College at CortlandChoice, May 2007
Ramet (Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology) is a distinguished leading scholar on Yugoslavia who has made important contributions to the substantial literature on that unhappy land. This first-rate volume is a substantially enlarged, rewritten edition of Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia, 1962, 1991 (CH, Feb'93, 30-3476). It is a must read posing big questions, e.g., why Yugoslavs have repeatedly failed to create an effective legitimate state structure and rule of law. Ramet rejects the myth, unfortunately widespread in the West, that the driving force has been ethnic conflict and ancient hatreds. Her work complements the study by V. P. Gagnon Jr., The Myth of Ethnic War: Serbia and Croatia in the 1990s (CH, Sep'05, 43-0597), by focusing on elite behavior. While she looks at prior state-building efforts (1918-29), she concentrates chiefly on Tito's Yugoslavia. Nearly half of this thick volume covers the post, 1989 period through KFOR and Kosovo. The inclusion of 150 pages of notes and more than 25 pages of bibliography underscore the deep research of this work, which concludes with a short chapter on the separate paths of Slovenia, Macedonia, and Croatia. Ramet throws much light on three Yugoslavias and also helps readers think about similar events elsewhere. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty.-H. Steck, SUNY College at CortlandChoice, May 2007
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Choice, April 2007
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Yugoslavia exploded as front page news in the early 1990s, and it was felt that this meltdown had occurred because of ancient hatreds. This work demonstrates that the instability of the three states can be attributed to the failure of governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy.
Main Description
Yugoslavia exploded onto the front pages of world newspapers in the early 1990s. The War of Yugoslav Succession of 1991--1995 convinced many that interethnic violence was endemic to politics in Yugoslavia and that the Yugoslav meltdown had occurred because of ancient hatreds. In this thematic history of Yugoslavia in the 20th century, Sabrina P. Ramet demonstrates that, on the contrary, the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states -- the interwar kingdom (1918--41), socialist Yugoslavia (1945--91), and the rump Yugoslav state created in 1992, consisting of Serbia and Montenegro -- can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy. Ramet places emphasis on the failure of the state-building project and the absence of political legitimation, rather than on ineluctable or abstract historical forces. Based on extensive archival research and fieldwork and the culmination of more than two decades of study, The Three Yugoslavias is a major contribution to an understanding of Yugoslavia and its successor states.
Main Description
Yugoslavia exploded onto the front pages of world newspapers in the early 1990s. The War of Yugoslav Succession of 1991-1995 convinced many that interethnic violence was endemic to politics in Yugoslavia and that the Yugoslav meltdown had occurred because of ancient hatreds. In this thematic history of Yugoslavia in the 20th century, Sabrina P. Ramet demonstrates that, on the contrary, the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states-the interwar kingdom (1918-41), socialist Yugoslavia (1945-91), and the rump Yugoslav state created in 1992, consisting of Serbia and Montenegro-can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy. Ramet places emphasis on the failure of the state-building project and the absence of political legitimation, rather than on ineluctable or abstract historical forces. Based on extensive archival research and fieldwork and the culmination of more than two decades of study, The Three Yugoslavias is a major contribution to an understanding of Yugoslavia and its successor states.
Main Description
Yugoslavia exploded onto the front pages of world newspapers in the early 1990s. The War of Yugoslav Succession of 1991-1995 convinced many that interethnic violence was endemic to politics in Yugoslavia and that the Yugoslav meltdown had occurred because of ancient hatreds. In this thematic history of Yugoslavia in the 20th century, Sabrina P. Ramet demonstrates that, on the contrary, the instability of the three 20th-century Yugoslav states - the interwar kingdom (1918-41), socialist Yugoslavia (1945-91), and the rump Yugoslav state created in 1992, consisting of Serbia and Montenegro - can be attributed to the failure of succeeding governments to establish the rule of law and political legitimacy. Ramet places emphasis on the failure of the state-building project and the absence of political legitimation, rather than on ineluctable or abstract historical forces. Based on extensive archival research and fieldwork and the culmination of more than two decades of study, The Three Yugoslavias is a major contribution to an understanding of Yugoslavia and its successor states. Sabrina P. Ramet is Professor of Political Science at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim, Norway. She is the author of six other books, among them Nationalism and Federalism in Yugoslavia (IUP, 1992), Whose Democracy? Nationalism, Religion, and the Doctrine of Collective Rights in Post-1989 Eastern Europe, Balkan Babel, and Nihil Obstat: Religion, Politics, and Social Change in East-Central Europe and Russia (Duke University Press). She has also edited a dozen books, mostly about Eastern Europe and Russia.
Table of Contents
A theory of system legitimacyp. 13
The first Yugoslavia, part 1 : the kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, 1918-1929p. 35
The first Yugoslavia, part 2 : the kingdom of Yugoslavia, 1929-1941p. 79
World War Two and the partisan struggle, 1941-1945p. 113
Happy comrades? : Tiro, Stalin, and the birth of the second Yugoslavia, 1945-1951p. 163
Dreaming a new dream, 1950-1962p. 185
The reform crisis, 1962-1970p. 207
The rise and fall of Yugoslav liberalism, 1967-1973p. 227
Controversies in the economic sector, 1965-1990p. 263
Nationalist tensions, 1968-1990p. 285
A crisis of legitimacy, 1974-1989p. 325
Hail Caesar! : the rise of Slobodan Milosevicp. 341
The road to warp. 363
The war of Yugoslav succession, phase 1 (1991)p. 381
The war of Yugoslav succession, phase 2 (1992-1995)p. 413
A flawed peace : post-Dayton Bosniap. 471
The third Yugoslavia and after, 1992-2005p. 495
UNMIK, KFOR, and the future of Kosovop. 537
Separate paths : Slovenia, Macedonia, Croatiap. 553
Conclusionp. 597
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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