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Three studies in medieval religious and social thought [electronic resource] /
Giles Constable.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
description
xix, 423 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521305152
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York, NY, USA : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
isbn
0521305152
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The interpretation of Mary and Martha -- The ideal of the imitation of Christ -- The orders of society.
catalogue key
8083923
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 361-403) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Constable's "three studies" constitute a far more organic and integrated book than the modest title implies. The subjects of these studies have several important things in common: each is a theme that attracted interpretation, discussion, and teaching from very early origins (two, and possibly three, of them biblical) until well into the modern period; each underwent a turning point in interpretation and relevance during the 12th century; each found visual as well as textual representation (amply and intelligently discussed here); each contributed genuinely and profoundly to social and political as well as religious thought. This book is an elegant complement to Constable's forthcoming book on the Reformation in the 12th century, a central time in the the history of these topics, which were some of the keys to the 12th century. But Constable's coverage of them ranges far beyond that century, back to early scriptural exegesis and forward to the 18th century. The book also casts important light on the active and contemplative lives, the individual Christian's appropriate behavior in the light of Christ's life, and the changing structures of medieval society, as does the rest of the rich recent literature on these topics--the work of Chenu, Baldwin, Duby, and others. The appendix really constitutes a fourth study, more specific to the Middle Ages but no less informative and provocative than the other three. The author's learning and eloquence are expected--but the topics and their treatment are original, fresh, and valuable. Upper-division undergraduate; graduate; faculty; general. E. Peters; University of Pennsylvania
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... a work of great maturity and sophistication ... to which students of twelfth-century religious life will turn again and again with fresh appreciation each time of its richness and wisdom ... These studies will become foundational for future scholars of medieval religious life, and therefore merit careful, engaged reading - the highest mark of scholarly achievement.' John Van Engen, Journal of Eccclesiastical History
'... a work of great maturity and sophistication ... to which students of twelfth-century religious life will turn again and again with fresh appreciation each time of its richness and wisdom ... These studies will become foundational for future scholars of medieval religious life, and therefore merit careful, engaged reading - the highest mark of scholarly achievement.'John Van Engen, Journal of Eccclesiastical History
''¦ a work of great maturity and sophistication '¦ to which students of twelfth-century religious life will turn again and again with fresh appreciation each time of its richness and wisdom '¦ These studies will become foundational for future scholars of medieval religious life, and therefore merit careful, engaged reading - the highest mark of scholarly achievement.'John Van Engen, Journal of Eccclesiastical History
"Constable himself laments that here was much material he was not able to include. But one doubts that any reader will complain about the richness of the material discussed in these essays, which fully accomplish the author's goal of displaying the richness and variety of medieval culture." Bryn Mawr Medieval Review
"Constable is an excellent historian scholar who encompasses the best in disciplined historical documentary research with a broad interdisciplinary grasp of the salient issues in a number of disparate fields of inquiry....Highly recommended." The Reader's Review
"If Constable has missed any noteworthy expressions concerning the subjects he treats, he has not missed many. His presentation of evidence is awesomely meticulous....a work rich in learning and insights." Robert E. Lerner, American Historical Review
"Rarely has there been such a thoroughly sustained and literally descriptive analysis of three themes as that done by Professor Constable in the volume under review." Steven Chase, Speculum
"These three studies, in gestation over a period of thirty years, constitute a remarkable and densly packed dossier....Constable not only reports thoroughly the evidence from the main collections of written sources, but also draws on evidence from art history....this volume will become an indispensable guide for those who would try to understand how traditional Christendom differed from yet birthed the modern West." Dennis D. Martin, Anglican Theological Review
"The three studies...are bibliographically and topically independenteach contributes to a rich developmental picture of medieval society and spirituality." Theological Studies
"...the topics and their treatment are original, fresh, and valuable." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This volume concentrates on the changes in religious thought and institutions in the eleventh and twelfth centuries.
Description for Bookstore
This volume of three Studies concentrates on the changes in religious thought and institutions in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, and includes not only monks and nuns but also less organised types of life such as hermits, recluses, crusaders and penitents. It is complementary to Professor Constable's forthcoming book The Reformation of the Twelfth Century, but is dissimilar from it in examining three themes over a long period, from late antiquity to the seventeenth century, in order to show how they changed over time. The interpretation of Mary and Martha deals primarily (but not exclusively) with the balance of action and contemplation in Christian life; the ideal of the imitation of Christ studies the growing emphasis on the human Christ, especially His body and wounds; and the orders of society looks at the conceptual divisions of society and the emergence of the modern idea of a middle class.
Description for Library
This volume concentrates on the changes in religious thought and institutions in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. It is complimentary to Professor Constable's subsequent book, The Reformation of the Twelfth Century (now also published as a paperback), but is dissimilar to it in examining three themes over a long period, from late Antiquity to the seventeenth century, in order to show how they changed over time.
Main Description
These three studies concentrate on the changes in religious thought and institutions in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, and include not only monks and nuns but also less organized types of life such as hermits, recluses, crusaders, and penitents. "The Interpretation of Mary and Martha" deals primarily with the balance of action and contemplation in Christian life; "The Ideal of the Imitation of Christ" studies the growing emphasis on the human Christ, especially His body and wounds; and "The Orders of Society" looks at the conceptual divisions of society and the emergence of the modern idea of a middle class.
Main Description
This volume concentrates on the changes in religious thought and institutions in the eleventh and twelfth centuries, and includes not only monks and nuns but also less organised types of life such as hermits, recluses, crusaders, and penitents. It is complimentary to Professor Constable's subsequent book, The Reformation of the Twelfth Century (now also published as a paperback), but is dissimilar to it in examining three themes over a long period, from late Antiquity to the seventeenth century, in order to show how they changed over time.
Table of Contents
List of illustrations
Preface
List of abbreviations
The Interpretation of Mary and Martha
The sisters together
The sisters distinguished
The sisters apart
The Ideal of the Imitation of Christ
The imitation of the divinity of Christ
The imitation of the humanity of Christ
The imitation of the body of Christ
The late Middle Ages
The Orders of Society
Introduction
The early Middle Ages
The eleventh and twelfth centuries
From the twelfth century to the end of the Middle Ages
Appendix: mediocres (mediani, medii) in the Middle Ages
Bibliography of secondary works
Index of manuscripts
Biblical index
General index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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