Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Roman domestic buildings /
edited by Ian M. Barton.
imprint
Exeter : University of Exeter Press, 1996.
description
xv, 194 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., plans, maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0859894150 (pbk)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Exeter : University of Exeter Press, 1996.
isbn
0859894150 (pbk)
catalogue key
807256
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A book that can serve excellently as an introduction to the studies of Roman private houses, either for undergraduate students in archaeology or for general readers with an interest in ancient culture. The authors succeed in transmitting important information concerning the way of living in countryside and town, not only in Italy but also in the remote regions of the empire." Mnemosyne , Vol. LII, 1999
"A book that can serve excellently as an introduction to the studies of Roman private houses, either for undergraduate students in archaeology or for general readers with an interest in ancient culture. The authors succeed in transmitting important information concerning the way of living in countryside and town, not only in Italy but also in the remote regions of the empire." Mnemosyne, Vol. LII, 1999
". . . a useful starting place. Unfamiliar words are collected in a glossary, and notes to each chapter provide references to some of the more specialist works. An index of sites serves as a guide to finding discussion of them in the text and to their location on four maps. The text is amplified by black and white plates and a generous number of line drawings, the latter generally placed conveniently close to the discussion. A guide to further reading is also included . . ." The Classical Review , Vol. XLVIII, No. 1, 1998
". . . a useful starting place. Unfamiliar words are collected in a glossary, and notes to each chapter provide references to some of the more specialist works. An index of sites serves as a guide to finding discussion of them in the text and to their location on four maps. The text is amplified by black and white plates and a generous number of line drawings, the latter generally placed conveniently close to the discussion. A guide to further reading is also included . . ." The Classical Review, Vol. XLVIII, No. 1, 1998
" . . . deals with topics that are important for any teacher of Latin or Classical Civilisation, while its scale and clarity of organization make it accessible to sixth-formers." JACT Review , Summer 1998
" . . . deals with topics that are important for any teacher of Latin or Classical Civilisation, while its scale and clarity of organization make it accessible to sixth-formers." JACT Review, Summer 1998
"In format, price, and tone the book easily succeeds (like its forerunner companion, Roman Public Buildings) in divulging a great deal of information in accessible terms." Greece and Rome , 44.2 (October 1997)
"In format, price, and tone the book easily succeeds (like its forerunner companion, Roman Public Buildings) in divulging a great deal of information in accessible terms." Greeceand Rome, 44.2 (October 1997)
"The rich variety of buildings across the Roman Empire is cleverly explored by the authors, the similarities and the differences being equally fascinating . . . One fascinating element to emerge is the Romans' love of their gardens. How timeless seem some of the attempts to include garden space in densely populated urban areas." British Archaeology
"The rich variety of buildings across the Roman Empire is cleverly explored by the authors, the similarities and the differences being equally fascinating . . . One fascinating element to emerge is the Romans'' love of their gardens. How timeless seem some of the attempts to include garden space in densely populated urban areas." British Archaeology
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Aiming to provide an architectural picture of Roman society, this book looks at domestic buildings from hovels to palaces. It brings out the political, social and economic significance of the buildings, as well as the technical architectural features.
Main Description
A study of the political, social and economic significance of all kinds of residential buildings. E. J. Owens writes about the planning of residential areas, A. J. Brothers discusses urban housing, John Percival looks at rural houses and Ian Barton considers Roman palaces, finally Nicholas Purcell writes about gardens and David Davidson examines military accommodation. The essays are accompanied by plans and photographs and a glossary of architectural terms. A long awaited companion to the author's successful Roman Public Buildings.
Main Description
From the hovels of peasants to the palaces of monarchs, this book provides an architectural picture of Roman society through a study of domestic buildings.
Table of Contents
Figures, Plates and Maps
Acknowledgements
Notes on Contributors
Abbreviations for Collections of Inscriptions
Introductionp. 1
Residential Districtsp. 7
Urban Housingp. 33
Houses in the Countryp. 65
Palacesp. 91
The Roman Garden as a Domestic Buildingp. 121
Military Housingp. 153
Glossaryp. 183
Guide to Further Readingp. 187
Index of Sites and Buildingsp. 189
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem