Catalogue


Alexander the Great : man and God /
Ian Worthington.
imprint
Harlow ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2004.
description
xxiii, 343, [20] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 20 cm.
ISBN
0582772249
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2004.
isbn
0582772249
catalogue key
8042727
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Ian Worthington is Professor of Greek History at the University of Missouri-Columbia.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-09-01:
Worthington (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia) has entered a crowded field with his new, sparsely footnoted biography of Alexander the Great, who has attracted a great deal of scholarly interest in the past few decades. Alexander is what his biographers have made him, for though there is no doubt that he changed the history of the ancient Mediterranean world (to say nothing of the Middle East), the best sources for his life wrote long after he was dead. They used contemporary sources and the memoirs of his generals, now lost, but even so, they present Alexander from perspectives shaped by the world he left behind him. Did Alexander murder his father to win the throne? Was he a ruthless conqueror unable to accept limits to his ambition? A world leader who tried to fuse East and West? Worthington's Alexander is none of these so much as an ambitious CEO who lets nothing stands in his way. This biography aimed at undergraduate students of ancient Greek history is a balanced picture of the great Macedonian king that refuses to idealize or denigrate him. Worthington's treatment of Alexander as strategist is particularly commendable. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Public and undergraduate collections. J. A. S. Evans emeritus, University of British Columbia
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2004
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Ian Worthington's fascinating account of Alexander the Great's colourful, but ultimately destructive, life is a welcome addition to the legend surrounding the most famous figure in ancient history.He delves underneath the tales of epic success and heroism into the darker side of Alexander's personality; the drinking, murderous rages and paranoia to question whether he really deserves to be called 'Great'.Endorsements:Professor Worthington's Alexander is a bit of a chameleon. He was at once an eminently practical and incomparably successful general and yet a dreamer who saw himself as literally a son of Zeus. His character, personality and temper were not improved by his binge-drinking and he ended by being more of an oriental potentate than a Macedonian warrior king. His most fatal flaw was to allow himself to be haunted by the ghost of his father Philip, with whom he waged a battle of emulation to the premature end of his own life. Ian Worthington's book has many virtues, including a clear narrative that shows intimate familiarity with the primary sources and secondary literature. It is accessibly written in an unemotional style for a wide general readership.Professor Paul Cartledge, Professor of Greek History, Clare College, Cambridge_________________Ian Worthington brings an immediacy to ancient history that is exciting and compelling. The characters live and breathe and there are many vivid moments of drama, such as Philip of Macedon acknowledging the cheering crowds as his assassin plunges in the dagger, that stay in the mind long after you have put the book down. A ripping read.Terry Jones
Long Description
He conquered territories on a superhuman scale and established an empire that stretched from Greece to India. He spread Greek culture and education throughout his empire, and was worshipped as a living god by many of his subjects. But how great is a leader responsible for the deaths on tens of thousands of people? A ruler who prefers constant warring to administering the peace? A man who believed he was a god, who murdered his friends, and recklessly put his soldiers lives at risk?<>Ian Worthington delves into the successes and failures, his paranoia, the murders he engineered, his megalomania, and his constant drinking. It presents a king corrupted by power and who, for his own personal ends, sacrificed the empire his father had fought to establish.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Of all the kings and conquerors of antiquity, Alexander the Great is the most famous and the most controversial. He conquered most of the known world and believed he was a god. He was also a paranoid, alcoholic megalomaniac. Dead at 33, his empire collapsed in his wake. Just how great was Alexander?
Main Description
He conquered most of the known world and thought himself a god. However, he also died a paranoid, alocholic wreck at the age of 33...after which his entire empire collapsed. So, just how great was Alexander? Hardback was - very - successful. Paperback to be released same time as new Colin Farrell film New material in the paperback on the army and Alexander's treatment of exiles Huge interest in ancient world at the moment driven byGladiator, Troyand multifarious TV programmes and of course specific films and TV on Alexander the Great. There are two new Hollywood films of his life in production. Accessibly written for general reader, not scholar New portrait of the single most important figure of the ancient world - reveals the real Alexander, waste and all. Fascinating account of a massively colourful if ultimately destructive life Provides new interpretations of the question of Alexander's corruption and paranoia Fully illustrated - brings alive the age as well as the man
Main Description
He conquered territories on a superhuman scale and established an empire that stretched from Greece to India. He spread Greek culture and education throughout his empire, and was worshipped as a living god by many of his subjects. But how great is a leader responsible for the deaths on tens of thousands of people? A ruler who prefers constant warring to administering the peace? A man who believed he was a god, who murdered his friends, and recklessly put his soldiers lives at risk? Ian Worthington delves into the successes and failures, his paranoia, the murders he engineered, his megalomania, and his constant drinking. It presents a king corrupted by power and who, for his own personal ends, sacrificed the empire his father had fought to establish.
Main Description
He conquered most of the known world and thought himself a god. However, he also died a paranoid, alocholic wreck at the age of 33...after which his entire empire collapsed. So, just how great was Alexander? Hardback was - very - successful. Paperback to be released same time as new Colin Farrell film New material in the paperback on the army and Alexander's treatment of exiles Huge interest in ancient world at the moment driven by Gladiator, Troy and multifarious TV programmes and of course specific films and TV on Alexander the Great. There are two new Hollywood films of his life in production. Accessibly written for general reader, not scholar New portrait of the single most important figure of the ancient world - reveals the real Alexander, waste and all. Fascinating account of a massively colourful if ultimately destructive life Provides new interpretations of the question of Alexander's corruption and paranoia Fully illustrated - brings alive the age as well as the man
Back Cover Copy
Ian Worthington s fascinating account of Alexander the Great s colourful, but ultimately destructive, life is a welcome addition to the legend surrounding the most famous figure in ancient history. He delves underneath the tales of epic success and heroism into the darker side of Alexander s personality; the drinking, murderous rages and paranoia to question whether he really deserves to be called Great . Endorsements: Professor Worthington's Alexander is a bit of a chameleon. He was at once an eminently practical and incomparably successful general and yet a dreamer who saw himself as literally a son of Zeus. His character, personality and temper were not improved by his binge-drinking and he ended by being more of an oriental potentate than a Macedonian warrior king. His most fatal flaw was to allow himself to be haunted by the ghost of his father Philip, with whom he waged a battle of emulation to the premature end of his own life. Ian Worthington's book has many virtues, including a clear narrative that shows intimate familiarity with the primary sources and secondary literature. It is accessibly written in an unemotional style for a wide general readership. Professor Paul Cartledge, Professor of Greek History, Clare College, Cambridge _________________ Ian Worthington brings an immediacy to ancient history that is exciting and compelling. The characters live and breathe and there are many vivid moments of drama, such as Philip of Macedon acknowledging the cheering crowds as his assassin plunges in the dagger, that stay in the mind long after you have put the book down. A ripping read. Terry Jones
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. vi
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Mapsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiv
Alexander's Reign: The Main Eventsp. xvi
Map of Macedonia and Greecep. xvii
Map of Alexander's Empirep. xviii
Introduction: Uncovering the Legendp. 1
Alexander's Inheritancep. 7
Alexander's Boyhoodp. 22
King at Lastp. 32
The Very Gates of Asiap. 48
A Bridge of Corpsesp. 67
Son of Ra, Son of Zeusp. 83
Lord of Asiap. 93
Conquest and Conspiracyp. 116
Bactria and Sogdianap. 132
Indiap. 145
'We'll say Goodbye in Babylon'p. 172
Death and Disorderp. 188
Man and Godp. 199
Alexander: The Greatp. 207
Philip's Ghostp. 218
Notesp. 222
Bibliographic Essayp. 234
Indexp. 243
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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