Catalogue

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Publishing, politics, and culture [electronic resource] : the King's Printers in the reign of James I and VI /
by Graham Rees and Maria Wakely.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009.
description
xi, 280 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
ISBN
0199576319, 9780199576319
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
added author
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009.
isbn
0199576319
9780199576319
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
The King's Printers : monopolies, business, and lawsuits -- Printing, litigation, prison -- Resources human and material -- The King's Printers' Bible and Book of common prayer monopoly -- Special editions 1616-1620 : folios fit for a king -- 1620 : the King's Printers' Annus mirabilis -- The King's Printers' methods -- Stockholding, shops, and sales -- John Norton, John Bill, and the Frankfurt catalogues -- John Norton, and John Bill : international trade -- Afterword : King James I and VI, and his printers.
abstract
Based on hitherto unexplored and unpublished legal and business records, this study presents a full account of London printing firms in the reign of James I. In particular it examines the businesses of men associated with that crucial instrument of cultural production--the King's Printing House.--
catalogue key
8041483
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages 252-262) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
a learned and original book, in which every chapter is packed with new information and new insights ... Publishing, Politics & Culture really is an inspiring book.
a tour de force of scholarship... Engagingly and wittily (sometimes waspishly) written, excitingly broad in its scope, their book provides an invigorating challenge to historians of the book to get to work on extending this remarkable history of the King's Printing House
Wonderfully researched, insightful, and immensely entertaining book... Historians of the book, bibliographers, intellectual historians, political historians, and literary scholars will all find new and surprising material here.
"Wonderfully researched, insightful, and immensely entertaining book...Historians of the book, bibliographers, intellectual historians, political historians, and literary scholars will all find new and surprising material here." --Huntington Library Quarterly
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Based on hitherto unexplored and unpublished legal and business records, this study presents a full account of London printing firms in the reign of James I. In particular it examines the businesses of men associated with that crucial instrument of cultural production - the King's Printing House.
Long Description
Based on hitherto unexplored and unpublished legal and business records, this study presents the fullest account so far published of any London printing firm in the reign of James I. In particular it examines the businesses of men associated with that crucial instrument of cultural production-the King's Printing House. This institution stood four-square at the top of the London printing and publishing trade, for it monopolized the right to print the Bible, Book of Common Prayer, andother indispensable works promoted or encouraged by the king. The office of King's Printer, initially owned by Robert Barker, was potentially very lucrative, and so attracted the predatory attentions of the prosperous book-trade partnership of John and Bonham Norton, and John Bill. The stage was setfor bitter rivalry between Barker and his opponents, rivalry which involved sharp practice, deceit, bullying, and downright thuggery-with lawsuits to match. Barker was no fool yet he was up against very able, resourceful individuals who understood better than Barker that they were in business to promote the king's politico-cultural programme, and extend his influence at home and abroad. That is exactly what John Norton and John Bill did, and to such good effect and with his unique experience ofthe domestic and continental book trade, Bill eventually became the greatest London book trader, printer, publisher, disseminator of ideas, and cultural entrepreneur of his generation.
Main Description
Based on hitherto unexplored and unpublished legal and business records, this study presents the fullest account so far published of any London printing firm in the reign of James I. In particular it examines the businesses of men associated with that crucial instrument of culturalproduction-the King's Printing House. This institution stood four-square at the top of the London printing and publishing trade, for it monopolized the right to print the Bible, Book of Common Prayer, and other indispensable works promoted or encouraged by the king. The office of King's Printer,initially owned by Robert Barker, was potentially very lucrative, and so attracted the predatory attentions of the prosperous book-trade partnership of John and Bonham Norton, and John Bill. The stage was set for bitter rivalry between Barker and his opponents, rivalry which involved sharp practice,deceit, bullying, and downright thuggery-with lawsuits to match. Barker was no fool yet he was up against very able, resourceful individuals who understood better than Barker that they were in business to promote the king's politico-cultural programme, and extend his influence at home and abroad.That is exactly what John Norton and John Bill did, and to such good effect and with his unique experience of the domestic and continental book trade, Bill eventually became the greatest London book trader, printer, publisher, disseminator of ideas, and cultural entrepreneur of hisgeneration.
Main Description
This book presents the fullest account so far published of any London printing firm in the reign of James I. The King's Printing House stood at the top of the publishing trade-responsible for printing the Bible, and other works promoted by James. The office of King's Printer, held by Robert Barker, attracted the predatory attentions of the book-trade partnership of John and Bonham Norton, and John Bill. The ensuing bitter rivalries involved sharp practice, anddownright thuggery-with dramatic lawsuits to match. Barker was up against individuals who understood better than he that they were in business to promote the king's politico-cultural programme, and extend his influence at home and abroad. That is exactly what the Nortons and Bill did, and so effectivelythat Bill, with his unique experience of the domestic and continental book trade, eventually became the greatest London publisher of his generation.

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