Catalogue


Poetry and the creation of a Whig literary culture, 1681-1714 [electronic resource] /
Abigail Williams.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
description
303 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0199255202 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.
isbn
0199255202 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"This book offers a revisionist history of early eighteenth-century poetry. It demonstrates that many of the Whig writers frequently attacked as hacks and dunces were in fact successful and popular in their own time. This text maps the evolution of this poetic tradition, examining the relationship between literary and political culture in the early eighteenth-century"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8031331
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [258]-295) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
It will...constitute a valuable resource for both literary and historical students of the period.
There is much of interest here
'This study draws valuable attention to a neglected dimension of the crucial battle for cultural authority. Williams traces clearly the shifting polemics of Whig verse from Exclusion, through Tory reaction. Revolution and the reign of Queen Anne.'Times Literary Supplement
'This study draws valuable attention to a neglected dimension of thecrucial battle for cultural authority. Williams traces clearly the shiftingpolemics of Whig verse from Exclusion, through Tory reaction. Revolution and thereign of Queen Anne.'Times Literary Supplement
Introduction: Rereading Whig literary culture 1. The Tory Critique of Whig Literature 2. Moderation, Fanaticism and 'the people', 1681-1688 3. Legitimacy and the Warrior King, 1688-1702 4. Poetic Warfare, 1702-1714 5. The Sublime and the Liberty of Writing 6. Patronage and the Public Writer in Whig Literary Culture Conclusion: Whig Afterlives Biographical Appendix Bibliography
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides a new perspective on early 18th century poetry and literary culture, arguing that long-neglicted Whig poets such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, Thomas Tickell, and Richard Blackmore were more popular and successful in their own time than they have been since.
Long Description
Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture offers a new perspective on early eighteenth century poetry and literary culture, arguing that long-neglected Whig poets such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, Thomas Tickell, and Richard Blackmore were more popular and successful in their own time than they have been since. These and other Whig writers produced elevated poetry celebrating the political and military achievements of William III's Britain, and were committed to an ambitious project to create a distinctively Whiggish English literary culture after the Revolution of 1688. Far from being the penniless hacks and dunces satirized by John Dryden and the Scriblerians, they were supported by the patronage of the wealthy Whig aristocracy, and their works promoted as a new English literature to rival that of classical Greece and Rome. Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture maps for the first time the evolution of an alternative early eighteenth-century poetic tradition which is central to our understanding of the literary history of the period.
Long Description
Poetry and the Creation of Whig Literary Culture offers a revisionist history of early eighteenth-century poetry. It demonstrates that many of the Whig writers frequently attacked as hacks and dunces by Alexander Pope and John Dryden were in fact successful and popular in their own time. Writers such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, Thomas Tickell, and Richard Blackmore produced elevated poetry celebrating the achievements of post-Revolution Britain, verse which was heralded by their Whig contemporaries as the evidence of a new native literary excellence. This book maps for the first time the evolution of this distinct poetic tradition, offering new insights into the relationship between literary and political culture in the early eighteenth-century.
Library of Congress Summary
"This book offers a revisionist history of early eighteenth-century poetry. It demonstrates that many of the Whig writers frequently attacked as hacks and dunces were in fact successful and popular in their own time. This text maps the evolution of this poetic tradition, examining the relationship between literary and political culture in the early eighteenth-century"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Poetry and the Creation of a Whig Literary Culture offers a new perspective on early eighteenth century poetry and literary culture, arguing that long-neglected Whig poets such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, Thomas Tickell, and Richard Blackmore were more popular and successful in their owntime than they have been since. These and other Whig writers produced elevated poetry celebrating the political and military achievements of William III's Britain, and were committed to an ambitious project to create a distinctively Whiggish English literary culture after the Revolution of 1688. Farfrom being the penniless hacks and dunces satirized by John Dryden and the Scriblerians, they were supported by the patronage of the wealthy Whig aristocracy, and their works promoted as a new English literature to rival that of classical Greece and Rome. Poetry and the Creation of a Whig LiteraryCulture maps for the first time the evolution of an alternative early eighteenth-century poetic tradition which is central to our understanding of the literary history of the period.
Main Description
'Poetry and the Creation of Whig literary Culture' offers a newperspective on early eighteenth century poetry and literary culture, arguingthat long-neglected Whig poets such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, ThomasTickell, and Richard Blackmore were more popular and successful in their owntime than they have been since. These and other Whig writers produced elevatedpoetry celebrating the political and military achievements of William III'sBritain, and were committed to an ambitious project to create a distinctivelyWhiggish English literary culture after the Revolution of 1688. Far from beingthe penniless hacks and dunces satirized by John Dryden and the Scriblerians,they were supported by the patronage of the wealthy Whig aristocracy, and theirworks promoted as a new English literature to rival that of classical Greece andRome. 'Poetry and the Creation of Whig Literary Culture' maps for the first timethe evolution of an alternative early eighteenth-century poetic tradition whichis central to our understanding of the literary history of the period.
Main Description
Poetry and the Creation of Whig Literary Culture offers a new perspective on early eighteenth century poetry and literary culture, arguing that long-neglected Whig poets such as Joseph Addison, John Dennis, Thomas Tickell, and Richard Blackmore were more popular and successful in their own time than they have been since. These and other Whig writers produced elevated poetry celebrating the political and military achievements of William III's Britain, and were committed to an ambitious project to create a distinctively Whiggish English literary culture after the Revolution of 1688. Far from being the penniless hacks and dunces satirized by John Dryden and the Scriblerians, they were supported by the patronage of the wealthy Whig aristocracy, and their works promoted as a new English literature to rival that of classical Greece and Rome. 'Poetry and the Creation of Whig Literary Culture' maps for the first time the evolution of an alternative early eighteenth-century poetic tradition which is central to our understanding of the literary history of the period.
Short Annotation
Poetry and the Creation of Whig Literary Culture offers a revisionist history of early eighteenth-century poetry.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Rereading Whig literary culture
The Tory Critique of Whig Literature
Moderation, Fanaticism and 'the people', 1681-1688
Legitimacy and the Warrior King, 1688-1702
Poetic Warfare, 1702-1714
The Sublime and the Liberty of Writing
Patronage and the Public Writer in Whig Literary Culture
Conclusion: Whig Afterlives
Biographical Appendix
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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