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Native place, city, and nation [electronic resource] : regional networks and identities in Shanghai, 1853-1937 /
Bryna Goodman.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
xii, 367 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520089170 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520089170 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8004809
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 325-347) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Bryna Goodman is Associate Professor of Modern Chinese History at the University of Oregon.
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A new look at China's urban culture during the early twentieth century. Erasing the dichotomy between tradition and modernity, the author examines the relationship between native-place sentiments and an emerging national identity."--Susan Mann, author ofLocal Merchants and the Chinese Bureaucracy, 1750-1950 "Bryna Goodman's work on native-place associations is one of the most important studies of Chinese social history to have appeared in the last ten years. It melds an ingeniously researched ethnography with a convincing narrative of urban history. The result is a highly original approach to the development of the modern Chinese city."--Philip A. Kuhn, author ofSoulstealers: The Chinese Sorcery Scare of 1768
Flap Copy
"A new look at China's urban culture during the early twentieth century. Erasing the dichotomy between tradition and modernity, the author examines the relationship between native-place sentiments and an emerging national identity."--Susan Mann, author of Local Merchants and the Chinese Bureaucracy, 1750-1950 "Bryna Goodman's work on native-place associations is one of the most important studies of Chinese social history to have appeared in the last ten years. It melds an ingeniously researched ethnography with a convincing narrative of urban history. The result is a highly original approach to the development of the modern Chinese city."--Philip A. Kuhn, author of Soulstealers: The Chinese Sorcery Scare of 1768
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-05-01:
Using a wide array of primary and secondary sources, Goodman has provided a carefully documented analysis of the effects of sentiment for native place over time (nearly a century) and in a specific and very important location (Shanghai). The book is a superb complement to general presentations of China's sociopolitical history. The glossary of Chinese terms with the original orthography and pinyin romanization is extensive and very helpful to specialists, and is essential for nonspecialists. Underlying the detailed information about place, time, and people is a very insightful discussion of the terms "traditional" and "modern." Goodman's analysis makes clear what is obvious but often ignored, that culture is neither static nor necessarily "traditional" as opposed to modern, but is a complex mix. The author traces the amalgamation of traditional and modern practices chronologically, from the aftermath of the Opium War through self-strengthening, the emergence of nationalism, and into the Republican period. Of special significance is the confirmation Goodman's study brings to the work of such anthropologists as Robert J. Smith. Goodman concludes that "The shifting forms of native-place association, changing institutional structures over time and the changing ideological justifications for these forms should make us realize that the elements of 'culture' are not inherently 'traditional' or 'modern' but the necessary, often useful, and always constraining paths of change." An important addition to any serious university or college collection on East Asia. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. H. Bailey Earlham College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1996
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Summaries
Long Description
This book explores the role of native place associations in the development of modern Chinese urban society and the role of native-place identity in the development of urban nationalism. From the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century, sojourners from other provinces dominated the population of Shanghai and other expanding commercial Chinese cities. These immigrants formed native place associations beginning in the imperial period and persisting into the mid-twentieth century. Goodman examines the modernization of these associations and argues that under weak urban government, native place sentiment and organization flourished and had a profound effect on city life, social order and urban and national identity.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: The Moral Excellence of Loving the Groupp. I
Foreign Imperialism, Immigration and Disorder: Opium War Aftermath and the Small Sword Uprising of 1853p. 47
Community, Hierarchy and Authority: Elites and Non-elites in the Making of Native-Place Culture during the Late Qingp. 84
Expansive Practices: Charity, Modern Enterprise, the City and the Statep. 119
Native-Place Associations, Foreign Authority and Early Popular Nationalismp. 147
The Native Place and the Nation: Anti-Imperialist and Republican Revolutionary Mobilizationp. 176
"Modern Spirit," Institutional Change and the Effects of Warlord Government: Associations in the Early Republicp. 217
The Native Place and the State: Nationalism, State Building and Public Maneuveringp. 258
Conclusion: Culture, Modernity and the Sources of National Identityp. 305
Population Growth in the International Settlement, 1910-30p. 315
Glossaryp. 317
Bibliographyp. 325
Indexp. 349
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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