Catalogue


A Ming society [electronic resource] : Tʻai-ho County, Kiangsi, fourteenth to seventeenth centuries /
John W. Dardess.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
description
xi, 316 p. : map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520204255 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1996.
isbn
0520204255 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7995494
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 297-309) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The scholarship is excellent, and the book is a culmination of a massive project of exhaustive research that has occupied Dardess for many years."--Robert Hymes, author ofOrdering the World "An important book, by an important historian. Not only did I gain a remarkable set of insights into Ming political and intellectual history from time invested in these pages, it was a genuine pleasure to read."--William T. Rowe, author ofHankow
Flap Copy
"The scholarship is excellent, and the book is a culmination of a massive project of exhaustive research that has occupied Dardess for many years."--Robert Hymes, author of Ordering the World "An important book, by an important historian. Not only did I gain a remarkable set of insights into Ming political and intellectual history from time invested in these pages, it was a genuine pleasure to read."--William T. Rowe, author of Hankow
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1997-08:
Drawing from a wide range of primary sources, Dardess (Univ. of Kansas) presents a well-researched assessment of transition in Tai-ho County, Kiangsi Province, China, from the 14th to the 17th century. He shows that the spirit of optimism and the deep sense of commitment to Tai-ho County declined throughout the Ming period, evidenced by diminished writing about the beauty of Tai-ho landscape and the sense of Tai-ho community by post-14th-century Tai-ho intellectuals. Dardess attributes this loss of intellectual identification to the increased difficulty faced by Tai-ho intellectuals in attaining office through Tai-ho connections after the 1457 palace coup, to the growth of powerful lineage institutions that replaced looser common-descent groups, and to new intellectual orientations in which pride in one's native locality had no place. Dardess's mastery of his resources is evident throughout the book, which includes superb analysis of Ming dynastic civil service recruitment policies and changing intellectual currents during the Ming period. An outstanding book by a noted historian of Ming China. Highly recommended. Undergraduates and above. V. J. Symons; Augustana College (IL)
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 1997
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Summaries
Long Description
John Dardess has selected a region of great political and intellectual importance, but one which local history has left almost untouched, for this detailed social history of T'ai-ho county during the Ming dynasty. Rather than making a sweeping, general survey of the region, he follows the careers of a large number of native sons and their relationship to Ming imperial politics. Using previously unexplored primary sources, Dardess details the rise and development of T'ai-ho village kinship, family lineage, landscape, agriculture, and economy. He follows its literati to positions of prominence in imperial government. This concentration on the history of one county over almost three centuries gives rise to an unusually sound and immediate understanding of how Ming society functioned and changed over time.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
The Land: Its Settlement, Use, and Appreciationp. 9
Managing the Local Wealthp. 47
The Demography of Family and Classp. 79
Patrilineal Groups and Their Transformationp. 112
Pathways to Ming Governmentp. 139
Colleagues and Proteges: The Fifteenth-Century World of the Tai-ho Grand Secretariesp. 173
Cutting Loose: The Provocative Style of Yin Chih (1427-1511)p. 196
Philosophical Furorsp. 215
Conclusion and Epiloguep. 247
Notesp. 255
Bibliographyp. 297
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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