Catalogue


Migration and empire [electronic resource] /
Marjory Harper and Stephen Constantine.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xi, 380 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0199250936 (hbk.), 9780199250936 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
0199250936 (hbk.)
9780199250936 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7994936
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [350]-357) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-08-01:
Harper (Univ. of Aberdeen, Scotland) and Constantine (Lancaster Univ., UK) take another look at the 19th-20th-century British Empire as a political network enabling, encouraging, and sometimes enforcing migration across the world. Synthesizing recent scholarship and presenting original research of their own, the authors portray a much more complex picture of migration than the familiar story of British male and family emigration to the settler colonies. Although the book's first third revisits this issue, two crucial chapters in the middle focus on immigration to Britain and non-European migration within the empire. Perhaps most interesting is the book's final third, including chapters devoted to the migration of single females, children unaccompanied by parents, and emigrants returning to their homelands. This last topic recognizes the impact of faster and cheaper transport and telecommunications on the meaning of migration in a world where emigrants can easily maintain contacts with and visit relatives who stayed behind. The book is an excellent summary of the major themes of imperial migration from an early-21st-century perspective, and a worthy addition to the Oxford History of the British Empire. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. A. M. Wainwright The University of Akron
Reviews
Review Quotes
Migration and Empire is both thoroughly engaging and very readable. I recommend it to anyone wanting, not only to understand a central element of our heritage, but also the current migration streams to this country.
This book marks something of a landmark in surveys of migration within the British Empire ... a quite staggering scope and depth of research ... a model for survey texts, innovative in its own right; it should be indispensable for teachers, students and scholars for years to come.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2011
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A unique comparative overview of the motives, means and experiences of three main flows of empire migrants from the 19th century to the post-colonial period, this book looks at the complex relationship between migration and empire.
Main Description
Migration and Empire provides a unique comparison of the motives, means, and experiences of three main flows of empire migrants. During the nineteenth century, the proportion of UK migrants heading to empire destinations, especially to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, increased substantially and remained high. These migrants included so-called 'surplus women' and 'children in need', shipped overseas to ease perceived social problems at home. Empire migrants also included entrepreneurs and indentured labourers from south Asia, Africa, and the Pacific (together with others from the Far East, outside the empire), who relocated in huge numbers with equally transformative effects in, for example, central and southern Africa, the Caribbean, Ceylon, Mauritius, and Fiji. The UK at the core of empire was also the recipient of empire migrants, especially from the 'New Commonwealth' after 1945. These several migration flows are analysed with a strong appreciation of the commonality and the complex variety of migrant histories. The volume includes discussion of the work of philanthropists (especially with respect to single women and 'children in care') as well as governments and entrepreneurs in organising much empire migration, and the business of recruiting, assisting, and transporting selected empire migrants. Attention is given to immigration controls that restricted the settlement of some non-white migrants, and to the mixture of motives explaining return-migration. The book concludes by indicating why the special relationship between empire and migration came to an end. Legacies remain, but by the 1970s political change and shifts in the global labour market had eroded the earlier patterns.
Main Description
Migration and Empire provides a unique comparison of the motives, means, and experiences of three main flows of empire migrants. During the nineteenth century, the proportion of UK migrants heading to empire destinations, especially to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, increasedsubstantially and remained high. These migrants included so-called 'surplus women' and 'children in need', shipped overseas to ease perceived social problems at home. Empire migrants also included entrepreneurs and indentured labourers from south Asia, Africa, and the Pacific (together with othersfrom the Far East, outside the empire), who relocated in huge numbers with equally transformative effects in, for example, central and southern Africa, the Caribbean, Ceylon, Mauritius, and Fiji. The UK at the core of empire was also the recipient of empire migrants, especially from the 'NewCommonwealth' after 1945. These several migration flows are analysed with a strong appreciation of the commonality and the complex variety of migrant histories. The volume includes discussion of the work of philanthropists (especially with respect to single women and 'children in care') as well as governments andentrepreneurs in organising much empire migration, and the business of recruiting, assisting, and transporting selected empire migrants. Attention is given to immigration controls that restricted the settlement of some non-white migrants, and to the mixture of motives explaining return-migration.The book concludes by indicating why the special relationship between empire and migration came to an end. Legacies remain, but by the 1970s political change and shifts in the global labour market had eroded the earlier patterns.
Main Description
The purpose of the five volumes of the Oxford History of the British Empire was to provide a comprehensive survey of the Empire from its beginning to end, to explore the meaning of British imperialism for the ruled as well as the rulers, and to study the significance of the British Empire as a theme in world history. The volumes in the Companion Series carry forward this purpose. They pursue themes that could not be covered adequately in the main series while incorporating recent research and providing fresh interpretations of significant topics. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. xiii
Introduction: The British Empire and Empire Migration, 1815 to the 1960sp. 1
Crossing the Atlantic: Migrants and Settlers in Canadap. 11
UK migrants and settlement patternsp. 12
Sponsors' motivesp. 16
The hopes and means of migrantsp. 21
Warnings and controversiesp. 26
Identitiesp. 32
Conclusionsp. 38
Land of Perpetual Summer: Australian Experiencesp. 41
Convicts as settlersp. 43
Pioneer pastoralistsp. 48
Free and assisted migration, 1830-1914p. 50
From Empire settlement to Australian immigration: twentieth-century schemesp. 56
Settlers and the unsettledp. 62
Identities old and newp. 68
Conclusionsp. 72
Sheep and Sunshine: New Zealandp. 75
Immigration: political and constitutional contextsp. 77
Ends and meansp. 84
Images and realitiesp. 93
Identitiesp. 102
Conclusionsp. 107
Africa South of the Saharap. 111
Migration and settlement in West, East, and Central Africap. 113
Politics and settlement in southern Africa, 1815-1910p. 122
Politics and settlement in South Africa after the Unionp. 131
Mines and migrants in southern Africap. 136
White settler identities and ideologies in Africap. 140
Conclusionsp. 144
Exile into Bondage? Non-White Migrants and Settlersp. 148
Indentured labour and plantation economiesp. 149
The free labour marketp. 156
Controversies: indentured and free labour in the plantation coloniesp. 159
'Whites only': the politics of immigration control in the empire of settlementp. 170
Conclusions: comparisons and identitiesp. 176
Immigration and the Heart of Empirep. 180
Immigrant originsp. 182
Mechanisms, networks, and settlement patternsp. 191
The legislative framework: freedom and controlp. 196
Attitudes and experiencesp. 199
Responses and identitiesp. 206
Conclusionsp. 208
A Civilizing Influence? The Female Migrantp. 212
Motives, marital status, and occupationsp. 215
Encouraging the exodus: the role of sponsorshipp. 223
Colonial perspectivesp. 229
Conflicting agendasp. 233
Migrant experiencesp. 238
Conclusions: evaluating women's migrationp. 244
Children of the Poor: Child and Juvenile Migrationp. 247
Roots and practitionersp. 250
Publicity, funding, and accountabilityp. 257
The child problem and the empire solutionp. 261
Experiencesp. 268
Criticisms and conclusionsp. 272
The Emigration Businessp. 277
Entrepreneurs and migrant recruitmentp. 277
Philanthropists and trade unionsp. 282
Settlers and the colonial statep. 284
The imperial government and the dispatch of settlersp. 290
Agentsp. 294
Transportp. 298
Conclusionsp. 304
The Homecoming Migrantp. 306
Making money and returning homep. 308
Family circumstances and homesicknessp. 314
Assisted returns and deportationsp. 319
Back home: pleasures and painsp. 324
Homecoming as tourismp. 333
Conclusionsp. 336
Afterword: The Politics of Migration and the End of Empirep. 338
Bibliographyp. 350
Indexp. 359
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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