Catalogue


Medieval Islamic economic thought [electronic resource] : filling the "great gap" in European economics /
edited by S.M. Ghazanfar ; foreword by S. Todd Lowry.
imprint
London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2003.
description
xv, 284 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0415297788 (hdbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
London ; New York : RoutledgeCurzon, 2003.
isbn
0415297788 (hdbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7991123
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-275) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'A comprehensive and analytical bibliography and a detailed Index of authors accompany this well-prepared and weighty edition.'- Journal of Oriental and African Studies
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This book is a collection of papers on the origins of economic thought discovered in the writings of some prominent Islamic scholars, during the five centuries prior to the Latin Scholastics, who include St. Thomas Aquinas. This period of time was labelled by Joseph Schumpeter as representing the 'great gap' in economic history. Unfortunately, this 'gap' is well embedded in most relevant literature. However, during this period the Islamic civilization was one of the most fertile grounds for intellectual developments in various disciplines, including economics, and this book attempts to fill that blind-spot in the history of economic thought.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Origins of economic thought can be discovered in the writings of Islamic scholars in the five centuries before the time of St Thomas Aquinas. Schumpeter named this period the 'great gap' in economic history. This collection of papers examines the lost contribution to economics made by these forgotten scholars.
Long Description
This book is a collection of papers on the origins of economic thought discovered in the writings of some prominent Islamic scholars, roughly during the five centuries prior to the Latin Scholastics, like St. Thomas Aquinas.
Table of Contents
Notes on contributors
Foreword
Acknowledgements
S.M. GhazanfarScholastic Economics and Arab Scholars: The "Great Gap" thesis reconsidered
S.M. Ghazanfarand A. Azim IslahiEconomic Thought of an Arab Scholastic: Abu-Hamid Al-Ghazali (AH450-505/1058-1111AD)
Paul OslingtonEconomic Thought and Religious Thought: A comment on Ghazanfar and Islahi
S.M. Ghazanfar and A. Azim IslahiA Rejoinder to "Economic Thought and Religious Thought"
S.M. Ghazanfar and A. Azim IslahiExplorations in Medieval Arab-Islamic Economic Thought: Some aspects of Ibn Taimiyah's economics
S.M. GahzanfarHistory of Economic Thought: The Schumpeterian "Great Gap", the "lost" Arab-Islamic legacy and the literature gap
Hamid HosseiniUnderstanding the Market Mechanism before Adam Smith: Economic thought in medieval Islam
Hamid HosseiniInnaccuracy of the Schumpeterian "Great Gap" Thesis: Economic thought in medieval Iran (Persia)
S.M. Ghazanfarand A. Azim IslahiExplorations in Medieval Arab-Islamic Ecomic Thought: Some aspects of Ibn Qayyim's economics (AH691-751/1292-1350AD)
S.M. GhazanfarMedieval Islamic Socio-Economic Thought: Links with Greek and Latin-European scholarship
S.M.GhazanfarPost-Greek/Pre-Renaissance Economic Thought: Contributions of Arab-Islamic Scholastics during the "Great Gap" centuries
S.M. GhazanfarThe Economic Thought of Abu Hamid Al-Ghazali and St Thomas Aquinas: Some comparative parallels and links
M. Nejatullah Siddiqiand S.M. Ghazanfar Early Medieval Islamic Economic Thought: Abu Yousuf's (731-798AD) economics of public finance
S.M. Ghazanfar Public-Sector Economics in Medieval Economic Thought: Contributions of selected Arab-Islamic scholars
S.M. Ghazanfar Medieval Social Thought European Renaissance: The influence of selected Arab-Islamic Scholastics
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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