Catalogue


Magical realism in West African fiction [electronic resource] : seeing with a third eye /
Brenda Cooper.
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1998.
description
viii, 250 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0415182395 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : Routledge, 1998.
isbn
0415182395 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7982996
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-246) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1999-01:
This fascinating study focuses on Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Kojo Laing of Ghana, and Ben Okri of Nigeria. Cooper (Univ. of Cape Town) argues that through their fiction these writers evoke their culturally complex postcolonial experiences, in which magical and scientific ways of interpreting the world coexist to capture the unity of opposites. The writers ultimately exist somewhere between nationalistic decolonization and a cosmopolitan magical realism. The first third of the text puts magical realism into a larger perspective, examining first the works of Salman Rushdie and several Latin American authors, including Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Cooper then turns to West Africa to briefly examine D.O. Fugunwa and Amos Tutuola, and then Kwame Anthony Appiah, Chinua Achebe, and Wole Soyinka. Finally, in the most satisfactory section of the book, Cooper discusses in some depth Okri's The Famished Road, Cheney-Coker's The Last Harmattan of Alusine Dunbar, and several novels by Laing. These are all works richly imbued with imaginative symbols and images, and Cooper does them and their authors justice. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. C. Pike; University of Minnesota
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 1999
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Summaries
Main Description
Magical Realism in West African Fiction focuses on the cultural politics of magical realism, as exemplified in the fiction of Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Ben Okri of Nigeria and Kojo Laing of Ghana and contextualizes their fiction within current debates and theories around the 'postcolonial' globally. Providing a thoughtful introduction to magical realism as a genre, Brenda Cooper uses Cheney-Coker, Okri and Laing to discuss the particular and distinct intervention of magical realism in a West African context. She examines the narrative techniques of novels that mingle the dimensions of magic, myth and historical reality, and addresses their position in relation to the more explicitely nationalist agendas of the realism of Achebe and others.
Unpaid Annotation
Providing a thoughtful introduction to magical realism as a genre, Brenda Cooper uses Cheney-Coker, Okri and Laing to discuss the particular and distinct intervention of magical realism in a West African context. She examines the narrative techniques of novels that mingle the dimensions of magic, myth and historical reality, and addresses their position in relation to the more explicitly nationalist agendas of the realism of Achebe and others.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work focuses on the cultural politics of magical realism, as exemplified in the fiction of Syl Cheney-Coker, Ben Okri and Kojo Laing, and contextualizes their fiction within current debates and theories regarding postcoloniality.
Back Cover Copy
This study contextualizes magical realism within current debates and theories of postcoloniality and examines the fiction of three of its West African pioneers: Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Ben Okri of Nigeria and Kojo Laing of Ghana. Brenda Cooper explores the distinct elements of the genre in a West African context, and in relation to:* a range of global expressions of magical realism, from the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez to that of Salman Rushdie* wider contemporary trends in African writing, with particular attention to how the realism of authors such as Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka has been connected with nationalist agendas.This is a fascinating and important work for all those working on African literature, magical realism, or postcoloniality.
Main Description
This study contextualizes magical realism within current debates and theories of postcoloniality and examines the fiction of three of its West African pioneers: Syl Cheney-Coker of Sierra Leone, Ben Okri of Nigeria and Kojo Laing of Ghana. Brenda Cooper explores the distinct elements of the genre in a West African context, and in relation to: * a range of global expressions of magical realism, from the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez to that of Salman Rushdie * wider contemporary trends in African writing, with particular attention to how the realism of authors such as Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka has been connected with nationalist agendas. This is a fascinating and important work for all those working on African literature, magical realism, or postcoloniality.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Seeing with a Third Eyep. 1
'sacred Names into Profane Spaces'p. 15
An Endless Forest of Terrible Creaturesp. 37
'out of the Centre of My Forehead, an Eye Opened'p. 67
'the Plantation Blood in His Veins'p. 115
Intermediate Magic and the Fiction of B.Kojo Laingp. 156
'old Gods, New Worlds'p. 216
Notesp. 227
Bibliographyp. 237
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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