Catalogue


The legacy of Alexander [electronic resource] : politics, warfare, and propaganda under the successors /
A. B. Bosworth.
imprint
Oxford [U.K.] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
xiii, 307 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198153066
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford [U.K.] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0198153066
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction 1 -- 2. The Politics of the Babylon Settlement 29 -- 3. Macedonian Numbers at the Death of Alexander the Great 64 -- 4. The Campaign in Iran: Turbulent Satraps and Frozen Elephants 98 -- 5. Hieronymus' Ethnography: Indian Widows and Nabataean Nomads 169 -- 6. The Rise of Seleucus 210 -- 7. Hellenistic Monarchy: Success andLegitimation 246 -- Appendix: Chronology of events between 323 and 311 BC 279.
catalogue key
7973472
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [285]-296) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
A. B. Bosworth is Professor of Classics and Ancient History, University of Western Australia.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-06-01:
Bosworth (Univ. of Western Australia) here extends his influential scholarship on Alexander to the 50 years following the king's death. He brings to this period his trademark sophisticated reading of ancient history and its evidence. The book is not a comprehensive history, but consists of several focused studies, loosely related. These include a Machiavellian (or Hobbesian) analysis of the distribution of territories and power among Alexander's marshals following his death; a modified reaffirmation of the author's claim that Macedonian military manpower was seriously depleted by Alexander and his successors; an excellent reconstruction of the fighting in Iran between Antigonus the One-Eyed and Eumenes; an analysis of ethnographic descriptions by the historian Hieronymous of Cardia, which, Bosworth argues, conveyed subtle political and moral messages; an untangling of the chronological mess surrounding King Seleucus' career with the help of new evidence from Babylonian records; and an argument that Hellenistic dynasts sought to legitimize their rule by exhibiting unselfish conduct and by imitating Alexander or claiming to have a special relationship with him. Some readers may dispute the author's analysis or assumptions, but scholars and advanced students of the period are well advised to consult this book. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. J. Roisman Colby College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'An essential acquisition for graduate and advanced undergraduate collections.'Rochelle Snee, Religious Studies Review
Bosworth displays all his historiographical and analytical skills in focussing on some of the major players of this confused and confusing epoch.
'B's main themes are important and he develops them well, with numerous trenchant and pithy observations. The portrait of Alexander he builds up is a sobering one, at times chilling. His forthright criticisms of the king will win him few friends among admirers of Alexander, but are a necessaryantidote to the recurrent temptation to idealize him.'A. D. Lee, The Classical Review
'B's main themes are important and he develops them well, with numeroustrenchant and pithy observations. The portrait of Alexander he builds up is asobering one, at times chilling. His forthright criticisms of the king will winhim few friends among admirers of Alexander, but are a necessary antidote to therecurrent temptation to idealize him.'A. D. Lee, The Classical Review
'Review from other book by this author For those whose interest in Alexander has been stirred, as well as for students of the period, this collection must become compulsory reading.'Contemporary Review
'Review from other book by this author For those whose interest inAlexander has been stirred, as well as for students of the period, thiscollection must become compulsory reading.'Contemporary Review
'sensitive discussion of Alexander the Great ... Bosworth judiciously assesses the sources, but also considers the geographical and social context. Professor Bosworth deserves to be read, and not just by classicists or historians of the ancient world, since this is a prudent investigation ofthe construction of the heroic image of a totalitarian ruler'Times Literary Supplement
'sensitive discussion of Alexander the Great ... Bosworth judiciouslyassesses the sources, but also considers the geographical and social context.Professor Bosworth deserves to be read, and not just by classicists orhistorians of the ancient world, since this is a prudent investigation of theconstruction of the heroic image of a totalitarian ruler'Times Literary Supplement
The Legacy of Alexander offers careful and sophisticated analysis of a variety of subjects concerning the Diadochs. Some of these are given full treatment here for the first time, particularly the conflict between Eumenes and Antigonos in Iran. Bosworth's extensive account of that campaign with its frozen salt deserts, intrigue and treason, is not only detailed and insightful but entertaining as well.
... the six essays that make up The Legacy of Alexander offer important, and often fascinating, examinations of many aspects of the genesis of the Hellenistic kingdoms.
'This monograph ... makes a number of profound statements not just about matters relating to Alexander's campaigns in the East, but also about fundamental issues which are central to Alexander studies ... What brings the whole book together and makes it work as a monograph is the subtleinterweaving of recurring themes ... an important contribution to Alexander studies ... It is a tight and controlled exposition and exploration of various problems connected with Alexander's campaigns in the East, while at the same time presenting deeper insights into who Alexander was asdisinterred from a difficult, complex and often contradictory source tradition.'Journal of Hellenic Studies
'This monograph ... makes a number of profound statements not just aboutmatters relating to Alexander's campaigns in the East, but also aboutfundamental issues which are central to Alexander studies ... What brings thewhole book together and makes it work as a monograph is the subtle interweavingof recurring themes ... an important contribution to Alexander studies ... It isa tight and controlled exposition and exploration of various problems connectedwith Alexander's campaigns in the East, while at the same time presenting deeperinsights into who Alexander was as disinterred from a difficult, complex andoften contradictory source tradition.'Journal of Hellenic Studies
What Bosworth doesn't know about the period around the life of Alexander the Great can be written on the back of a penny black, so the accuracy and content of this work is in no doubt.
1. Introduction 2. The Politics of the Babylon Settlement 3. Macedonian Numbers at the Death of Alexander the Great 4. Turbulent Satraps and Frozen Elephants: The Campaign in Iran 5. Hieronymus' Ethnography: Indian Widows and Nabataean Nomads 6. The Rise of Seleucus 7. Hellenistic Monarchy: Success and Legitimation AppendixChronology of events between 323 and 311 BC
'Review from other book by this author For those whose interest in Alexander has been stirred, as well as for students of the period, this collection must become compulsory reading.'Contemporary Review'An essential acquisition for graduate and advanced undergraduate collections.'Rochelle Snee, Religious Studies Review'sensitive discussion of Alexander the Great ... Bosworth judiciously assesses the sources, but also considers the geographical and social context. Professor Bosworth deserves to be read, and not just by classicists or historians of the ancient world, since this is a prudent investigation of the construction of the heroic image of a totalitarian ruler'Times Literary Supplement'This monograph ... makes a number of profound statements not just about matters relating to Alexander's campaigns in the East, but also about fundamental issues which are central to Alexander studies ... What brings the whole book together and makes it work as a monograph is the subtle interweaving of recurring themes ... an important contribution to Alexander studies ... It is a tight and controlled exposition and exploration of various problems connectedwith Alexander's campaigns in the East, while at the same time presenting deeper insights into who Alexander was as disinterred from a difficult, complex and often contradictory source tradition.'Journal of Hellenic Studies'B's main themes are important and he develops them well, with numerous trenchant and pithy observations. The portrait of Alexander he builds up is a sobering one, at times chilling. His forthright criticisms of the king will win him few friends among admirers of Alexander, but are a necessary antidote to the recurrent temptation to idealize him.'A. D. Lee, The Classical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study examines the colourful and turbulent period after the death of Alexander the Great and the extraordinary people who created the Successor monarchies. It explains how and why Alexander's empire was split up and investigates the fate of the Macedonian army of conquest.
Long Description
This major study by a leading expert is dedicated to the thirty years after the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. It deals with the emergence of the Successor monarchies and examines the factors which brought success and failure. Some of the central themes are the struggle for pre-eminence after Alexander's death, the fate of the Macedonian army of conquest, and the foundation of Seleucus' monarchy. Bosworth also examines the statesman and historian Hieronymus of Cardia,concentrating on his treatment of widow burning in India and nomadism in Arabia. Another highlight is the first full analysis of the epic struggle between Antigonus and Eumenes (318-316), one of the most important and decisive campaigns of the ancient world.
Long Description
This major study by a leading expert is dedicated to the thirty years after the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. It deals with the emergence of the Successor monarchies and examines the factors which brought success and failure. Some of the central themes are the struggle for pre-eminence after Alexander's death, the fate of the Macedonian army of conquest, and the foundation of Seleucus' monarchy. Bosworth also examines the statesman and historian Hieronymus of Cardia, concentrating on his treatment of widow burning in India and nomadism in Arabia. Another highlight is the first full analysis of the epic struggle between Antigonus and Eumenes (318-316), one of the most important and decisive campaigns of the ancient world.
Main Description
This major study by a leading expert is dedicated to the thirty years after the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. It deals with the emergence of the Successor monarchies and examines the factors that brought success and failure.
Main Description
This major study by a leading expert is dedicated to the thirty years after the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC. It deals with the emergence of the Successor monarchies and examines the factors which brought success and failure. Some of the central themes are the struggle forpre-eminence after Alexander's death, the fate of the Macedonian army of conquest, and the foundation of Seleucus' monarchy. Bosworth also examines the statesman and historian Hieronymus of Cardia, concentrating on his treatment of widow burning in India and nomadism in Arabia. Another highlight isthe first full analysis of the epic struggle between Antigonus and Eumenes (318-316), one of the most important and decisive campaigns of the ancient world.
Table of Contents
Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. 1
The Politics of the Babylon Settlementp. 29
Macedonian Numbers at the Death of Alexander the Greatp. 64
The Campaign in Iran: Turbulent Satraps and Frozen Elephantsp. 98
Hieronymus' Ethnography: Indian Widows and Nabataean Nomadsp. 169
The Rise of Seleucusp. 210
Hellenistic Monarchy: Success and Legitimationp. 246
Chronology of events between 323 and 311 BCp. 279
Bibliographyp. 285
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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