Catalogue


Landscapes of resistance [electronic resource] : the German films of Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub /
Barton Byg.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
xiii, 303 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520089081 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520089081 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7970771
 
Filmography: p. 293-299.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-292) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The elucidation of the utopian, cross-cultural aspirations of these major film-makers is particularly welcome. I wound up following Byg's investigative account like a Raymond Chandler mystery."--Jonathan Rosenbaum, author ofMoving PlacesandPlacing Movies
Flap Copy
"The elucidation of the utopian, cross-cultural aspirations of these major film-makers is particularly welcome. I wound up following Byg's investigative account like a Raymond Chandler mystery."--Jonathan Rosenbaum, author of Moving Placesand Placing Movies
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-10-01:
The films of the European director team of Straub and Huillet are rarely screened and virtually unknown in the US. Byg (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst) provides an excellent introduction to the 11 German-language films of these directors. His work supplants Richard Roud's Jean-Marie Straub (CH, May'73), the only other treatment of the topic in English. Drawing on the theories of Brecht, Adorno, and Benjamin, Byg demonstrates how these filmmakers fit into the German cultural matrix and how at the same time they confront and react to it. He also discusses influences on their work, the relationship of their difficult films to cinematic tradition and the avant-garde, and the questions of adaptation and translation. The author has a fine grasp of the research and argues his points convincingly. Although the presentation may be too rhetorical for some undergraduates, the book is essential reading for serious students and scholars of German film. R. Acker University of Montana
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 1996
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Fervently admired and frequently reviled, Jean-Marie Straub and Daniele Huillet--who have lived and worked together for almost forty years--may well be the most uncompromising, not to say intransigent, filmmakers in the history of the medium. Their radical and deeply political films placed them as forerunners of the New German Cinema movement in the 1960s and influential figures in the subsequent explosion of the European avant-garde. In "Landscapes of Resistance, Barton Byg fills a significant gap in modern German and European cinema studies by tracing the career of the two filmmakers and exploring their connection to German modernism, in particular their relationship to the Frankfurt School.Although they are not German themselves, Straub and Huillet have used German material as the basis for the majority of their films. They have transcribed prose by Boll and Kafka, operas by Schoenberg, and verse dramas by Holderlin. Byg explores how their work engages German culture with a critical distance and affection and confronts the artificiality of divisions between high and low culture.
Long Description
Fervently admired and frequently reviled, Jean-Marie Straub and DaniÈle Huillet--who have lived and worked together for almost forty years--may well be the most uncompromising, not to say intransigent, filmmakers in the history of the medium. Their radical and deeply political films placed them as forerunners of the New German Cinema movement in the 1960s and influential figures in the subsequent explosion of the European avant-garde. InLandscapes of Resistance, Barton Byg fills a significant gap in modern German and European cinema studies by tracing the career of the two filmmakers and exploring their connection to German modernism, in particular their relationship to the Frankfurt School. Although they are not German themselves, Straub and Huillet have used German material as the basis for the majority of their films. They have transcribed prose by BÖll and Kafka, operas by Schoenberg, and verse dramas by Holderlin. Byg explores how their work engages German culture with a critical distance and affection and confronts the artificiality of divisions between high and low culture.
Main Description
Fervently admired and frequently reviled, Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet--who have lived and worked together for almost forty years--may well be the most uncompromising, not to say intransigent, filmmakers in the history of the medium. Their radical and deeply political films placed them as forerunners of the New German Cinema movement in the 1960s and influential figures in the subsequent explosion of the European avant-garde. In Landscapes of Resistance, Barton Byg fills a significant gap in modern German and European cinema studies by tracing the career of the two filmmakers and exploring their connection to German modernism, in particular their relationship to the Frankfurt School. Although they are not German themselves, Straub and Huillet have used German material as the basis for the majority of their films. They have transcribed prose by Böll and Kafka, operas by Schoenberg, and verse dramas by Holderlin. Byg explores how their work engages German culture with a critical distance and affection and confronts the artificiality of divisions between high and low culture.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Straub/Huillet and the Cinema: Tradition and Avant-gardep. 7
Straub/Huillet, the New Left, and Germanyp. 29
Traces of a Life: Chronicle of Anna Magdalena Bachp. 51
Formal and Political Radicalism in the Short Films of the 1960sp. 71
Time and Memory in Postwar Germany: Not Reconciledp. 95
History Lessons and Brecht's The Business Affairs of Mr. Julius Caesarp. 117
Musical Modernism and the Schoenberg Filmsp. 139
The Power to Narrate: Class Relations and Kafka's Amerikap. 164
Language in Exile: Holderlin's The Death of Empedoclesp. 178
Film as "Translation"p. 199
Antigonep. 215
Real History and the Nonexistent Spectator: Brecht, Adorno, and Straub/Huilletp. 233
Notesp. 249
Selected Bibliographyp. 285
Filmographyp. 293
Indexp. 301
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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