Catalogue


A Jesuit in the Forbidden City [electronic resource] : Matteo Ricci, 1552-1610 /
R. Po-chia Hsia.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
xiv, 359 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780199592258 (hbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780199592258 (hbk. : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7965323
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [342]-349) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-06-01:
Hsia (Penn State) offers a work of scholarly expertise on the life and times of Matteo Ricci that is also accessible and enjoyable. The famous 16th-century Jesuit missionary to China fascinates and inspires many 400 years later. Hsia demonstrates why. Ricci's map of the world, his correspondence with Jesuits, his study of language, and his philosophical and theological commentaries come freshly alive, providing a worthy portrait of not just Ricci and his work, but also Renaissance Europe and its intellectual and scientific achievements; the vast outreach of the Portuguese shipping enterprise; the cultural, political, and educational sensibilities of China's Ming Dynasty; and the ethos and global expansion of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits). Hsia also appreciates the intricacies of Ricci's inner life: fears, frustrations, processes of discernment and their strategic results, the impact of friendships, occasional bouts of homesickness, and more. Hsia's presentation of technical terms (Chinese names, places, and concepts) exudes integrity of precision in a comfortable, even enthralling, narrative. Of special interest is Hsia's attention to possible syntheses and problematic incompatibilities between Buddhist, Christian, and Confucian practices and beliefs in Chinese, European, and Indian expressions. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. D. S. Hendrickson Teachers College Columbia University
Reviews
Review Quotes
Accessible yet highly readable, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City is a riveting read and probably the most fully detailed re-telling of Matteo Ricci's mission to China, re-capturing the exhilaration but dangerous exoticness of his life.
A riveting read and highly detailed, yet is an accessible retelling of Matteo Ricci's mission to China, recapturing both the exhilaration and the dangerous exoticism of his life.
Deeply learned yet rivetingly readable, R Po-Chia Hsia's biography introduces a remarkable figure whose life represents a dramatic cultural collision of east and west.
Hsia enables us to see the Jesuit's achievement in a much fuller and richer context than hitherto... he deserves our considerable gratitude for leaving us with such a vivid and affecting, yet critically acute, portrait.
Meticulously researched...A Jesuit in the Forbidden City will be the definitive biography for decades to come...fascinating
Ronnie Po-chia Hsia's A Jesuit in the Forbidden City is hands down the best scholarly biography of Ricci to date, and unlikely to be surpassed ... the book provides an account that is accessible as well as thorough.
"The biography reiterates Ricci's stunning intellectual achievements and scientific expertise."--Jocelyn M. N. Marinescu "The book is a solid biography with accurate and abundant resources."--Paul Sung Cheun Noh "...a rich , magisterial study...."---Karen Gottschang Turner, College of the Holy Cross
"The biography reiterates Ricci's stunning intellectual achievements and scientific expertise."--Jocelyn M. N. Marinescu "The book is a solid biography with accurate and abundant resources."--Paul Sung Cheun Noh "...a rich , magisterial study...."---Karen Gottschang Turner, College of the Holy Cross "This is a fine book, one which makes a signal contribution to our understanding of early modern Europe's interactions with East Asia...In its carefulness and depth of research, its elegance of prose, and its balanced evaluations, I believe that this book will stand the test of time."--ChurchHistory "A significant, timely, and important contribution to many fields of scholarship. This work thus not only takes its place as an equal among its worthy predecessors in this subset of studies about East-West cultural exchange during the late Ming and early Qing dynasties but also becomes the mark to which all other works must now aspire."--Journal of World History
Well-researched, well-written, insightful biography
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2011
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Summaries
Long Description
A 16th century Italian Jesuit, Matteo Ricci was the founder of the Catholic Mission in China and one of the most famous missionaries of all time. A pioneer in bringing Christianity to China, Ricci spent twenty eight years in the country, in which time he crossed the cultural divides between China and the West by immersing himself in the language and culture of his hosts. Even 400 years later, he is still one of the best known westerners in China, celebrated for introducing westernscientific and religious ideas to China and for explaining Chinese culture to Europe.The first critical biography of Ricci to use all relevant sources, both Chinese and Western, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City tells the story of a remarkable life that bridged Counter-Reformation Catholic Europe and China under the Ming dynasty. Hsia follows the life of Ricci from his childhood in Macerata, through his education in Rome, to his sojourn in Portuguese India, before the start of his long journey of self-discovery and cultural encounter in the Ming realm. Along the way, weglimpse the workings of the Portuguese maritime empire in Asia, the mission of the Society of Jesus, and life in the European enclave of Macau on the Chinese coast, as well as invaluable sketches of Ricci's fellow Jesuits and portraits of the Chinese mandarins who formed networks indispensible for Ricci'ssuccess. Examining a range of new sources, Hsia offers important new insights into Ricci's long period of trial and frustration in Guangdong province, where he first appeared in the persona of a foreign Buddhist monk, before the crucial move to Nanchang in 1595 that led to his sustained intellectual conversation with a leading Confucian scholar and subsequent synthesis of Christianity and Confucianism in propagating the Gospels in China. With his expertise in cartography, mathematics and astronomy,Ricci quickly won recognition, especially after he had settled in Nanjing in 1598, the southern capital of the Ming dynasty. As his reputation and friendships grew, Ricci launched into a sharp polemic against Buddhism, while his career found its crowning achievement in the imperial capital of Beijing,leaving behind a life, work, and legacy that is still very much alive today.
Main Description
A 16th century Italian Jesuit, Matteo Ricci was the founder of the Catholic Mission in China and one of the most famous missionaries of all time. A pioneer in bringing Christianity to China, Ricci spent twenty eight years in the country, in which time he crossed the cultural divides between China and the West by immersing himself in the language and culture of his hosts. Even 400 years later, he is still one of the best known westerners in China, celebrated for introducing western scientific and religious ideas to China and for explaining Chinese culture to Europe. The first critical biography of Ricci to use all relevant sources, both Chinese and Western,A Jesuit in the Forbidden Citytells the story of a remarkable life that bridged Counter-Reformation Catholic Europe and China under the Ming dynasty. Hsia follows the life of Ricci from his childhood in Macerata, through his education in Rome, to his sojourn in Portuguese India, before the start of his long journey of self-discovery and cultural encounter in the Ming realm. Along the way, we glimpse the workings of the Portuguese maritime empire in Asia, the mission of the Society of Jesus, and life in the European enclave of Macau on the Chinese coast, as well as invaluable sketches of Ricci's fellow Jesuits and portraits of the Chinese mandarins who formed networks indispensible for Ricci's success. Examining a range of new sources, Hsia offers important new insights into Ricci's long period of trial and frustration in Guangdong province, where he first appeared in the persona of a foreign Buddhist monk, before the crucial move to Nanchang in 1595 that led to his sustained intellectual conversation with a leading Confucian scholar and subsequent synthesis of Christianity and Confucianism in propagating the Gospels in China. With his expertise in cartography, mathematics and astronomy, Ricci quickly won recognition, especially after he had settled in Nanjing in 1598, the southern capital of the Ming dynasty. As his reputation and friendships grew, Ricci launched into a sharp polemic against Buddhism, while his career found its crowning achievement in the imperial capital of Beijing, leaving behind a life, work, and legacy that is still very much alive today.
Main Description
A 16th century Italian Jesuit, Matteo Ricci was the founder of the Catholic Mission in China and one of the most famous missionaries of all time. A pioneer in bringing Christianity to China, Ricci spent twenty eight years in the country, in which time he crossed the cultural divides betweenChina and the West by immersing himself in the language and culture of his hosts. Even 400 years later, he is still one of the best known westerners in China, celebrated for introducing western scientific and religious ideas to China and for explaining Chinese culture to Europe.The first critical biography of Ricci to use all relevant sources, both Chinese and Western, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City tells the story of a remarkable life that bridged Counter-Reformation Catholic Europe and China under the Ming dynasty. Hsia follows the life of Ricci from his childhood inMacerata, through his education in Rome, to his sojourn in Portuguese India, before the start of his long journey of self-discovery and cultural encounter in the Ming realm. Along the way, we glimpse the workings of the Portuguese maritime empire in Asia, the mission of the Society of Jesus, andlife in the European enclave of Macau on the Chinese coast, as well as invaluable sketches of Ricci's fellow Jesuits and portraits of the Chinese mandarins who formed networks indispensible for Ricci's success. Examining a range of new sources, Hsia offers important new insights into Ricci's long period of trial and frustration in Guangdong province, where he first appeared in the persona of a foreign Buddhist monk, before the crucial move to Nanchang in 1595 that led to his sustained intellectualconversation with a leading Confucian scholar and subsequent synthesis of Christianity and Confucianism in propagating the Gospels in China. With his expertise in cartography, mathematics and astronomy, Ricci quickly won recognition, especially after he had settled in Nanjing in 1598, the southerncapital of the Ming dynasty. As his reputation and friendships grew, Ricci launched into a sharp polemic against Buddhism, while his career found its crowning achievement in the imperial capital of Beijing, leaving behind a life, work, and legacy that is still very much alive today.
Main Description
The first critical biography that uses all the relevant sources, both Chinese and Western, of the 16th century Italian Jesuit Matteo Ricci, founder of the Catholic Mission in China and one of the most famous missionaries of all time. A pioneer in bringing Christianity to China, Ricci spent twenty eight years in the country, in which time he crossed the cultural divides between China and the West by immersing himself in the language and culture of his hosts. Even400 years later, he is still one of the best known westerners in China, celebrated for introducing western scientific and religious ideas to China and for explaining Chinese culture to Europe.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Platesp. ix
List of Mapsp. x
Abbreviationsp. xi
Prologuep. xii
Macerata and Romep. 1
Portuguese Seasp. 26
Macaop. 51
Zhaoqingp. 78
Ruggierip. 97
Shaozhoup. 116
Nanchangp. 141
Nanjingp. 169
Beijingp. 202
The True Meaning of the Lord of Heavenp. 224
Laying the Foundationsp. 245
The Man of Paradoxp. 268
Epiloguep. 287
Appendix: Magistrate's Verdict in Adultery Accusation against Michele Ruggierip. 309
Notesp. 311
Chinese Glossaryp. 331
Bibliographyp. 342
Indexp. 351
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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