Catalogue


International migration, social demotion, and imagined advancement [electronic resource] : an ethnography of socioglobal mobility /
Erind Pajo.
imprint
New York : Springer, c2008.
description
xvii, 213 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9780387719528 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
author
imprint
New York : Springer, c2008.
isbn
9780387719528 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7961035
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 203-206) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Erind Pajo is Assistant Researcher in Anthropology and Lecturer in Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine.
Summaries
Main Description
This book represents one of the first studies to look at the negative results of migration. Based on an ethnographic study focusing on Albanian migrants in Greece and Italy, the book discusses the reasons people leave their homeland for a "better life" - especially if that does not happen. It finds that imaginaries of the world as a social hierarchy might lie at the root of much of the contemporary international migration.
Back Cover Copy
Contemporary migration involves a dramatic paradox. Although much of what is considered international or transnational migration today transforms people of a wide range of social standings in the emigration countries into laborers at the bottom social and economic ranks of the immigration countries, millions of individuals worldwide seek to migrate internationally. International Migration, Social Demotion, and Imagined Advancement argues that this paradox cannot be explained for as long as common preconceptions about immigrants' economic betterment thwart even questioning why individuals who are not threatened by famine or war willingly pursue their demotion abroad. Recognizing immigrants' decline as such, this book proposes viewing contemporary migration as socioglobal mobility. Revolving around an ethnographic study of the Albanian "emigration" in Greece, International Migration, Social Demotion, and Imagined Advancement finds that imaginaries of the world as a social hierarchy might lie at the roots of much of the contemporary international migration. As would-be emigrants perceive different countries in terms of distinct social stations in a global order, they resolve to put up with numerous social and material deprivations in the hope of advancing internationally. Immigrants are typically thought of as aliens in their de facto home societies, however, and that makes genuine advancement all but impossible.Erind Pajo is Assistant Researcher in Anthropology and Lecturer in Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine.
Main Description
Contemporary migration involves a dramatic paradox. Although much of what is considered international or transnational migration today transforms people of a wide range of social standings in the emigration countries into laborers at the bottom social and economic ranks of the immigration countries, millions of individuals worldwide seek to migrate internationally. International Migration, Social Demotion, and Imagined Advancement argues that this paradox cannot be explained for as long as common preconceptions about immigrants' economic betterment thwart even questioning why individuals who are not threatened by famine or war willingly pursue their demotion abroad. Recognizing immigrants' decline as such, this book proposes viewing contemporary migration as socioglobal mobility. Revolving around an ethnographic study of the Albanian "emigration" in Greece, International Migration, Social Demotion, and Imagined Advancement finds that imaginaries of the world as a social hierarchy might lie at the roots of much of the contemporary international migration. As would-be emigrants perceive different countries in terms of distinct social stations in a global order, they resolve to put up with numerous social and material deprivations in the hope of advancing internationally. Immigrants are typically thought of as aliens in their de facto home societies, however, and that makes genuine advancement all but impossible. Erind Pajo is Assistant Researcher in Anthropology and Lecturer in Social Sciences at the University of California, Irvine.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
List of Mapsp. xiii
List of Tablesp. xv
List of Photographsp. xvii
International Migration as Socioglobal Mobilityp. 1
Down and Under as Economic Advantagep. 2
The Meaning of Migrants' Moneyp. 8
Socioglobal Mobilityp. 9
A Preliminary Portrait of the Albanian Emigrationp. 11
Ethnography and the Discursive Scapep. 25
Emigration as Everyone Knows Itp. 25
The Feeling of All the Emigrantsp. 30
Never a One Will Know What Every Emigrant Knowsp. 35
The Structure of This Ethnographyp. 38
Portrait of Lumturi F., High School Teacher, Domestic Cleaner, Kitchen Help, Maidp. 44
The Beginning Is Always a Little Difficultp. 44
The First Time "in Europe"p. 45
They Had Come to Greece for Their Childrenp. 48
From the Restaurant to Athensp. 48
Maybe a Cursed Landp. 50
Greece Is Better than Albaniap. 52
The Objective Inferiority of Albaniap. 52
Objectifications of Individuality, Distinction, and Indistinction in Albaniap. 57
Objective Contradictions in Greecep. 63
Greece Is Better than Albaniap. 68
Portrait of Petraq Z., Research Scientist, Plumber's Aide, Maker of Icon Frames, Champion of Capitalismp. 70
A PhD Is about Learningp. 70
Capitalism in Greece Is Fairer Than Socialism in Albaniap. 72
Starting Capitalp. 73
Greeks Cannot Be Blamed for the Bad Name of the Albaniansp. 74
Greece According to Marxp. 75
Your Country Is Something That Can Never Changep. 76
Sufferings of the Soulp. 78
A Richer and Unhappy Lifep. 78
The Sufferings of Intellectual Superiority in the Employment of Economic Inferiorityp. 80
Xenophobia, Racism, and Hate of Albaniansp. 84
From the Economic Inferiority of Intellectual Superiority to Economic Justice for Inferiorityp. 90
Portrait of Fatmir R., High School Principal, Democrat, Janitor, Maintenance Technician, Contemporary Citizenp. 95
There Was an Economic Elevation in Albaniap. 95
Getting Out of the Red Circlep. 96
Always Willing to Learnp. 97
Cutting Off the Emotional Relationship with the Worldp. 98
The Economic Disadvantages of Emigrationp. 101
Racism and Economicsp. 101
The Economics of Illegalityp. 106
The Economics of Statelessnessp. 111
Remittancesp. 117
Portrait of Llambi S., Math Teacher, Member of Albania's Party of Labor, Olive Plucker, Construction Helper, Lottery Peddler, Cafe Proprietorp. 121
Albania's Downhillp. 121
A Minoritar in Albaniap. 122
The Party Had Exaggerated a Bit about the Capitalist Worldp. 124
An Ethnic Greek, but an Albanian at Heartp. 126
Why Emigrants Do Not Return to Albaniap. 127
The Past in the Present of Albaniap. 127
The Continuity of Declinep. 130
The Objective Position of the "Common Human" in Albaniap. 135
When You Have Moved Forward, It Is Hard to Move Backwardp. 138
Portrait of Drita H., Chemical Engineer, Domestic Cleaner, Moviegoer, Balletomanep. 141
The End of Albania's Good Timesp. 141
Unexpected Turnsp. 143
Emigrants Will Never Make Millionsp. 144
Without Fruit, Life Would Not Be Worth Livingp. 145
Books, Movies, Balletp. 146
The World According to the Emigrantsp. 149
Territorialized Fulfillmentp. 149
Geography and Hierarchyp. 153
America, Where Things Are as Things Ought to Bep. 156
The World Hierarchyp. 159
Portrait of Ilir, Known As Panajotis, Embassy Child, Ex-Politically Persecuted, Internment Farm Worker, Baker's Aide, Specialist of Floors, Would-be Rebuilder of the World Trade Centerp. 162
The McDonald's on the Syntagma Squarep. 162
Towards Athensp. 163
An Architect, or Perhaps a Diplomat Like His Fatherp. 165
In Greecep. 168
The American Lotteryp. 169
The Logic and the Experience of Emigrationp. 172
The Logic of Emigrationp. 172
The Subjection of Emigration Experiences to the Imaginary of World Hierarchyp. 173
The Roots of Actionp. 177
The Albanians of Greecep. 181
Portrait of Genci K., Student, Waiterp. 185
Reflecting on Things He Never Thought of Beforep. 185
To Become Somebodyp. 186
"Self-Realized"p. 188
Differences Between Peoplep. 189
The Good Things Life Once Hadp. 190
Socioglobal Articulations and Imaginariesp. 192
The Necessity for International Advancement in 1980s Albaniap. 192
The Impossibility of International Advancement in Contemporary Greecep. 196
The Socioglobalp. 201
Referencesp. 203
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem