Catalogue


Inscribing the time [electronic resource] : Shakespeare and the end of Elizabethan England /
Eric S. Mallin.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
xii, 276 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520086236 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520086236 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7958794
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Mallin brings an astute and historically informed critical mind to bear on the numerous ways in which contagion resonates throughout the period. . . . The book is also a lucid, witty, and engaging performance in its own right, a genuine pleasure to read."--Steven Mullaney, author of The Place of the Stage "Elegant in conception and witty in style, conversant with the broad methodological issues of early modern English cultural studies but sturdily independent in its take on current theory."--Gail Kern Paster, author of The Body Embarrassed
Flap Copy
"Mallin brings an astute and historically informed critical mind to bear on the numerous ways in which contagion resonates throughout the period. . . . The book is also a lucid, witty, and engaging performance in its own right, a genuine pleasure to read."--Steven Mullaney, author ofThe Place of the Stage "Elegant in conception and witty in style, conversant with the broad methodological issues of early modern English cultural studies but sturdily independent in its take on current theory."--Gail Kern Paster, author ofThe Body Embarrassed
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1996-02:
Topical historical interpretation has regained favor among Shakespeareans. In Puzzling Shakespeare (CH, Jun'89), Leah Marcus offered a graceful general account of the approach. Mallin's new study in the same series proves less accessible, and not merely because of its narrow focus. Readers may be scared off by sentences like this from the introduction: "The trope of resemblance within a work, like the theater's intussusception of literary features and parallel historical forms, implodes neat distinctions between text and history and coerces the breakdown of representational categories." However clotted in argument, Mallin's learned volume has some excellent (along with many eccentric) points to make about four plays from a period fraught with worry over the successor to the aged Elizabeth (1600-03). The first and last of the four long chapters work best: Mallin reads Troilus in light of Elizabethan political factions, Twelfth Night in connection with the tireless plotting of Mary Queen of Scots. The two long middle chapters on Hamlet present an intricate kaleidoscope of the historical analogues developed in books like Lilian Winstanley's Hamlet and the Scottish Succession (1921) but with a poststructuralist bad conscience about saying that anything in the play means any one thing in history. The result is a hash in which "everything means everything" as Mallin labors endless instances of "the opaque and garbled referentiality in which [Hamlet] engages at every turn." Graduate and research collections. E. D. Hill; Mount Holyoke College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 1996
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Summaries
Main Description
Combining the resources of new historicism, feminism, and postmodern textual analysis, Eric Mallin reveals how contemporary pressures left their marks on three Shakespeare plays written at the end of Elizabeth's reign. Close attention to the language of Troilus and Cressida, Hamlet, and Twelfth Nightreveals the ways the plays echo the events and anxieties that accompanied the beginning of the seventeenth century. Troilusreflects the rebellion of the Earl of Essex and the failure of the courtly, chivalric style. Hamletresonates with the danger of the bubonic plague and the difficult succession history of James I. Twelfth Nightis imbued with nostalgia for an earlier period of Elizabeth's rule, when her control over religious and erotic affairs seemed more secure.
Long Description
Combining the resources of new historicism, feminism, and postmodern textual analysis, Eric Mallin reveals how contemporary pressures left their marks on three Shakespeare plays written at the end of Elizabeth's reign. Close attention to the language ofTroilus and Cressida,Hamlet, andTwelfth Nightreveals the ways the plays echo the events and anxieties that accompanied the beginning of the seventeenth century.Troilusreflects the rebellion of the Earl of Essex and the failure of the courtly, chivalric style.Hamletresonates with the danger of the bubonic plague and the difficult succession history of James I.Twelfth Nightis imbued with nostalgia for an earlier period of Elizabeth's rule, when her control over religious and erotic affairs seemed more secure.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Emulous Factions and the Collapse of Chivalry: Troilus and Cressidap. 25
Word and Plague in the Second Quarto Hamletp. 62
Succession, Revenge, and History: The Political Hamletp. 106
"A twenty years' removed thing": Twelfth Night's Nostalgiap. 167
Notesp. 221
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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