Catalogue


The Aborigines' Protection Society : humanitarian imperialism in Australia, New Zealand, Fiji, Canada, South Africa, and the Congo, 1836-1909 /
James Heartfield.
imprint
London : Hurst, 2011.
description
xii, 379 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1849041202 (hbk.), 9781849041201 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Hurst, 2011.
isbn
1849041202 (hbk.)
9781849041201 (hbk.)
catalogue key
7955797
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is James Heartfield's comparative study of native protection policies in Southern Africa, the Congo, New Zealand, Fiji, Australia, and Canada - and how those with the best of intentions ended up championing colonisation.
Main Description
For more than seventy years, a select group of the great and the good fought for the natives of the British Empire. Anti-Slavery campaigner Thomas Fowell Buxton, medical pioneer Thomas Hodgkin, London Mayor Robert Fowler, the 'Zulu' Harriette Colenso, Joseph Chamberlain and Lord Shaftesbury were just some of the men and women who campaigned on behalf of the Aborigines' Protection Society. The Society shaped the British Empire, and fought against the tide of white supremacy to defend the interests of aboriginal peoples everywhere. Active on four continents, the Aborigines' Protection Society brought the Zulu King Cetshwayo to meet Queen Victoria, and Maori rebels to the Lord Mayor's banqueting hall. The Society's supporters were denounced by senior British Army officers and white settlers as Zulu-lovers, 'so-called friends of the Aborigines', and even traitors. The book tells the story of the three-cornered fight among the Colonial Office, the settlers and the natives that shaped the Empire and the pivotal role that the Society played, persuading the authorities to limit settlers' claims in the name of native interests. Against expectations, the policy of native protection turns out to be one of the most important reasons for the growth of Imperial rule. James Heartfield's comparative study of native protection policies in Southern Africa, the Congo, New Zealand, Fiji, Australia, and Canada - and how those with the best of intentions ended up championing colonisation. Pointing to the wreckage of humanitarian imperialism today, Heartfield sets out to understand its roots in the beliefs and practices of its nineteenth-century equivalents.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
How the Abolition of Slavery Changed Britain's Empirep. 3
The Select Committee on Aboriginesp. 9
The Aborigines' Protection Societyp. 23
An Empire to Protect Aboriginesp. 43
The Society and Public Opinionp. 55
Conflict with the Colonistsp. 61
Understanding the Nativesp. 71
The Aborigines' Protection Society's Impact on the Colonies
Australia and the First Aborigines' Protectoratep. 89
New Zealand and the Maorisp. 125
Fiji and the Western Pacificp. 159
The Indians of North Americap. 205
Colonising Southern Africap. 233
For and Against Leopold's Congop. 293
Afterword: Looking back at the Aborigines' Protection Societyp. 303
Notesp. 307
Bibliographyp. 357
Indexp. 371
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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