Catalogue


How to write a grant application [electronic resource] /
Allan Hackshaw.
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.
description
xv, 126 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1405197552 (pbk.), 9781405197557 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Chichester, West Sussex : Wiley-Blackwell, 2011.
isbn
1405197552 (pbk.)
9781405197557 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
People involved in the study -- Justification for the study -- Describing the study design -- Associated documents with the grant application -- Financial costs -- Funding body review process -- Annual reports and applying for a grant extension.
catalogue key
7949468
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 120-121) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Allan Hackshaw, Deputy Director of the Cancer Research UK and University College London Cancer Trials Centre, and Reader in Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, London, UK
Reviews
Review Quotes
Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010 Analysis of events, data, and trends affecting the information industry ===================================== Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis Semantic Assets by David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom The combination of Elseviers and Collexis knowledge discovery technologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to support scientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out by Elsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40. Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process. Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require that the principal investigator has assembled a research team which represents the pinnacle of multidisciplinary and international excellence. As science performance, planning and funding management become more directed by evidence-based assessment methods, so a market for scientific performance analytics emerges.
Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010 Analysis of events, data, and trends affecting the information industry ===================================== Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis Semantic Assets by David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom The combination of Elseviers and Collexis knowledge discovery technologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to supportscientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out by Elsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40. Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process. Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require that the principal investigator has assembled a research team which represents the pinnacle of multidisciplinary and international excellence. As science performance, planning and funding management become more directed by evidence-based assessment methods, so a market for scientific performance analytics emerges.
Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010Analysis of events, data, and trendsaffecting the information industry=====================================Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis' Semantic Assetsby David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom* The combination of Elsevier's and Collexis' knowledge discoverytechnologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to support scientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out byElsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40.Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process.Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require
Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010 Analysis of events, data, and trends affecting the information industry ===================================== Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis' Semantic Assets by David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom * The combination of Elsevier's and Collexis' knowledge discovery technologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to supportscientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out by Elsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40. Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process. Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require that the principal investigator has assembled a research team which represents the pinnacle of multidisciplinary and international excellence. As science performance, planning and funding management become more directed by evidence-based assessment methods, so a market for scientific performance analytics emerges.
"Intended for those who are preparing to apply for a clinical grant, this guide covers this complex process in an accessible manner." (Booknews, 1 April 2011)
"Intended for those who are preparing to apply for a clinical grant, this guide covers this complex process in an accessible manner." (Booknews, 1 April 2011) Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010 Analysis of events, data, and trends affecting the information industry ===================================== Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis'' Semantic Assets by David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom * The combination of Elsevier''s and Collexis'' knowledge discovery technologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to supportscientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out by Elsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40. Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process. Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require that the principal investigator has assembled a research team which represents the pinnacle of multidisciplinary and international excellence. As science performance, planning and funding management become more directed by evidence-based assessment methods, so a market for scientific performance analytics emerges.
Outsell Insights forJune 23, 2010Analysis of events, data, and trendsaffecting the information industry=====================================Elsevier Invests in Science Analytics, Acquires Collexis' Semantic Assetsby David Bousfield, Vice President & Lead Analyst - United Kingdom'ˆ— The combination of Elsevier's and Collexis' knowledge discoverytechnologies will create a powerful set of applications designed to support scientific management and assessment. Important Details: According to a world-wide survey carried out byElsevier, researchers now spend up to 30% of their time looking for funding and writing grant proposals, less than 15% of applications are successful, and the average age of first time National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipients is 40.Funders are attaching more and more conditions to their support programs. Some, such as the National Science Foundation, channel a significant proportion of their resources only to young applicants. Others limit the number of submissions, so that competing research institutions mandate pre-screening of applications so that they can coordinate a separate screening process.Furthermore, to get best value for their money, funders will often require that the principal investigator has assembled a research team which To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Researchers spend up to 30% of their time searching for funding and writing grant applications, but less than 15% are successful. This concise guide covers the important angles of your grant application, whether for a health research project or personal training programme, and will help you be among the successful applicants. The author, a reviewer for grant funding organisations and internationally respected research scientist, gives you the benefit of his experience from both sides of the process in this easy-to-use, readable guide. The book takes you through the grant application process, explaining how to: Present the justification for the proposed project Describe the study design clearly Estimate the financial costs Understand a typical review process, and how this can influence the contents of the grant applicationThe author provides practical advice on a range of project types (observational studies, clinical trials, laboratory experiments, and systematic reviews) to increase the chance that your application will be successful. There are also tips on what to avoid throughout the application.With generic information about application requirements, How to Write a Grant Application is ideal for healthcare professionals seeking a health services or scientific grant. Bowker Data Service Summary
Healthcare professionals who want to increase their chances of approval can depend on the practical advice found in this book. Providing a concise and easy-to-read overview, 'How to Write a Grant Application' includes pointers on what to include and what to avoid.
Main Description
Healthcare professionals who want to increase their chances of approval can depend on the practical advice found in this book by a highly experienced clinical trialist author. Providing a concise and easy-to-read overview, How to Write a Grant Application includes pointers on what to include and what to avoid.
Main Description
Provides a concise and easy-to-read overview of the main aspects of writing a grant application in clinical research. It is primarily aimed at new researchers, but is also beneficial to those who have had some experience with applying for grants.
Main Description
This concise guide covers the important angles of your grant application, whether for a health research project or personal training programme, and will help you be among the successful applicants. The author, a reviewer for grant funding organisations and internationally respected research scientist, gives you the benefit of his experience from both sides of the process in this easy-to-use, readable guide. The book takes you through the grant application process, explaining how to: Present the justification for the proposed project Describe the study design clearly Estimate the financial costs Understand a typical review process, and how this can influence the contents of the grant application The author provides practical advice on a range of project types (observational studies, clinical trials, laboratory experiments, and systematic reviews) to increase the chance that your application will be successful. There are also tips on what to avoid throughout the application. With generic information about application requirements, How to Write a Grant Application is ideal for healthcare professionals seeking a health services or scientific grant.
Main Description
This concise guide covers the important angles of your grant application, whether for a health research project or personal training programme, and will help you be among the successful applicants.The author, a reviewer for grant funding organisations and internationally respected research scientist, gives you the benefit of his experience from both sides of the process in this easy-to-use, readable guide. The book takes you through the grant application process, explaining how to: Present the justification for the proposed project Describe the study design clearly Estimate the financial costs Understand a typical review process, and how this can influence the contents of the grant applicationThe author provides practical advice on a range of project types (observational studies, clinical trials, laboratory experiments, and systematic reviews) to increase the chance that your application will be successful. There are also tips on what to avoid throughout the application. With generic information about application requirements, How to Write a Grant Application is ideal for healthcare professionals seeking a health services or scientific grant.
Back Cover Copy
Researchers spend up to 30% of their time searching for funding and writing grant applications, but less than 15% are successful. This concise guide covers the important angles of your grant application, whether for a health research project or personal training programme, and will help you be among the successful applicants. The author, a reviewer for grant funding organisations and internationally respected research scientist, gives you the benefit of his experience from both sides of the process in this easy-to-use, readable guide. The book takes you through the grant application process, explaining how to: Present the justification for the proposed project Describe the study design clearly Estimate the financial costs Understand a typical review process, and how this can influence the contents of the grant application The author provides practical advice on a range of project types (observational studies, clinical trials, laboratory experiments, and systematic reviews) to increase the chance that your application will be successful. There are also tips on what to avoid throughout the application. With generic information about application requirements, How to Write a Grant Application is ideal for healthcare professionals seeking a health services or scientific grant. Titles of Related Interest A Concise Guide to Clinical Trials Hackshaw ISBN: 9781405167741 How to Write a Paper, 4th Edition Hall ISBN ISBN: 9781405167734 How to Present at Meetings, 2nd Edition Hall ISBN 9781405139854 Website www.wiley.com/go/howtoseries
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
About the authorp. xv
Overviewp. 1
Types of grantsp. 2
Types of funding organisationsp. 3
Choosing an appropriate funding bodyp. 5
Contents of the grant applicationp. 6
Including several studies in one application (project grants)p. 6
Translational research sub-studiesp. 8
The application processp. 8
Estimating timelines and a planned work schedulep. 10
Intellectual propertyp. 12
Text, grammar and formatp. 13
People involved in the studyp. 15
Who should be part of the Study Team?p. 15
Other investigators, collaborators and consultantsp. 19
The host institution and Sponsorp. 20
Commercial companiesp. 21
Oversight committeesp. 21
Justification for the studyp. 24
Finding background informationp. 24
Previous evidence and similar research (why the study is needed now)p. 26
Biological plausibilityp. 28
Safety of new interventions in clinical trialsp. 29
Feasibilityp. 29
What will the study contribute?p. 31
Summary of the justification for a proposed studyp. 32
Describing the study designp. 35
Abstractp. 35
Appendicesp. 40
Study objectives and outcome measuresp. 40
Types of studiesp. 44
Observational studies in humansp. 44
Clinical trials in humansp. 49
Laboratory experimentsp. 57
Describing sample sizep. 60
Describing the main statistical analysesp. 64
Systematic reviewsp. 69
Associated documents with the grant applicationp. 72
Study protocolp. 72
Participant Information Sheetp. 73
Curricula vitae of the Chief Investigator and all co-applicantsp. 75
Letters of support from co-applicants, centre investigators, collaborators, or other advisorsp. 76
Letters of support from commercial companiesp. 76
Other documents specific to the field of researchp. 77
Financial costsp. 78
Overview of items to include in the financial costsp. 78
Indirect costs or overheads (full economic costs)p. 82
Per patient (or per subject) paymentsp. 83
Staff costsp. 84
Access to core funds and resourcesp. 86
Consideration of costs not to be met by the funding bodyp. 87
Grant applications associated with calls for proposalsp. 88
Observational studies in humansp. 88
Clinical trials in humansp. 93
Laboratory experimentsp. 97
Systematic reviewsp. 98
Funding body review processp. 100
Submitting the applicationp. 100
Processing the application within the funding bodyp. 102
Initial reviews (external reviewers)p. 102
Funding committee meetingp. 105
Funding committee evaluationp. 106
Feedback to applicants after the meetingp. 111
Responding to the funding committee feedbackp. 112
Annual reports and applying for a grant extensionp. 115
Annual reportsp. 115
Applying for a grant extensionp. 117
Bibliographyp. 120
Indexp. 123
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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