Catalogue


How fascism ruled women [electronic resource] : Italy, 1922-1945 /
Victoria de Grazia.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
description
xiii, 350 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520074564 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1992.
isbn
0520074564 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
"A Centennial book"--P. [iii].
catalogue key
7948920
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 289-338) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"For the common reader as well as the professional one, Victoria de Grazia opens doors and sheds new light on a fascinating subject."--Mary Gordon, author ofThe Other Side
Flap Copy
"For the common reader as well as the professional one, Victoria de Grazia opens doors and sheds new light on a fascinating subject."--Mary Gordon, author of The Other Side
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1991-11-15:
Extremely well researched and drawing upon a vast array of sources, this is the first full-length study of the experiences of women under Italian fascism. The author (history, Rutgers Univ.) places fascism's impact on women in the context of wider social, economic, and demographic changes arising out of World War I. Theorizing that Mussolini's government sought to ``nationalize'' women, she demonstrates how his regime affected women of different class, region, and occupation, how it contended with the Italian Catholic tradition, and how it used or created new kinds of social organizations to meet women's needs. De Grazia underscores that women were not simply passive victims of the dictatorship, however. Academics will be interested in the questions she provokes about women's experiences in mass politics in other European nations. For another book on Italian fascism, see Alexander Stille's Benevolence and Betrayal: Five Italian Jewish Families Under Fascism, reviewed in this issue, p. 95.--Ed.-- Marie Marmo Mul laney, Caldwell Coll., N.J. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1991-12-20:
This noteworthy study reveals how the regime of Il Ducein web , Benito Mussolini, systematically sought to prevent Italian women from experiencing emancipation even as he heralded the advent of the ``new Italian woman'' ( nuova italiana ). Analyzing the deep conflict between modernity and traditional patriarchal authority, de Grazia defines the emerging ideals of Italian womanhood in the 1920s and '30s when Catholic, Fascist and commercial models of conduct competed to shape women's perceptions of themselves and of their society. The author, who teaches history at Rutgers, has much to say about the quasi-religious cult of Ducismo, about Fascism's ``virilist'' politics and about the exaggerated machismo of a regime that taxed celibate men to pay for child welfare programs. The product of meticulous research and deep contemplation, the book is an important contribution to women's studies. Illustrations. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 1992-11:
A welcome and vital addition to undergraduate and graduate libraries. De Grazia's sophisticated but accessible treatment of women under Italian fascism portrays the experiences of women as they went about their daily lives during Mussolini's dictatorship. It places fascism's policies on women within a broad chronological and geographical context and it demonstrates the complex interaction of fascist goals and women's complicity in and resistance to the establishment and implementation of its program. As Mussolini and his followers sought to negotiate the contradictions between the requirements of the modern state and the deep-seated desire to recreate traditional (patriarchal) authority in the aftermath of WW I, they produced a paradoxical situation for women. The fascist regime prohibited women's participation in suffrage, in the labor force, and in decision-making affecting reproductive life. Yet fascist efforts to mobilize mass politics, to rationalize social services, and to prepare for war in the 1930s often produced some of the emancipatory developments they decried by eroding traditional roles and relationships for and between men and women. A must-read for students of European history. Undergraduate; graduate. S. K. Kent; University of Florida
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, November 1991
Publishers Weekly, December 1991
Choice, November 1992
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
"Italy has been made; now we need to make the Italians," goes a familiar Italian saying. Mussolini was the first head of state to include women in this mandate. How the fascist dictatorship defined the place of women in modern Italy and how women experienced the Duce's rule are the subjects of Victoria de Grazia's new work. De Grazia draws on an array of sources--memoirs and novels, the images, songs, and events of mass culture, as well as government statistics and archival reports. She offers a broad yet detailed characterization of Italian women's ambiguous and ambivalent experience of a regime that promised modernity, yet denied women emancipation. Always attentive to the great diversity among women and careful to distinguish fascist rhetoric from the practices that really shaped daily existence, the author moves with ease from the public discourse about femininity to the images of women in propaganda and commercial culture. She analyzes fascist attempts to organize women and the ways in which Mussolini's intentions were received by women as social actors. The first study of women's experience under Italian fascism, this is also a history of the making of contemporary Italian society.
Long Description
Italy has been made; now we need to make the Italians," goes a familiar Italian saying. Mussolini was the first head of state to include women in this mandate. How the fascist dictatorship defined the place of women in modern Italy and how women experienced theDuce's rule are the subjects of Victoria de Grazia's new work. De Grazia draws on an array of sources--memoirs and novels, the images, songs, and events of mass culture, as well as government statistics and archival reports. She offers a broad yet detailed characterization of Italian women's ambiguous and ambivalent experience of a regime that promised modernity, yet denied women emancipation. Always attentive to the great diversity among women and careful to distinguish fascist rhetoric from the practices that really shaped daily existence, the author moves with ease from the public discourse about femininity to the images of women in propaganda and commercial culture. She analyzes fascist attempts to organize women and the ways in which Mussolini's intentions were received by women as social actors. The first study of women's experience under Italian fascism, this is also a history of the making of contemporary Italian society.
Table of Contents
Preface
The Nationalization of Womenp. 1
The Legacy of Liberalismp. 18
Motherhoodp. 41
The Family Versus the Statep. 77
Growing Upp. 116
Workingp. 166
Going Outp. 201
Women's Politics in a New Keyp. 234
There Will Come a Dayp. 272
Notesp. 289
Indexp. 339
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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