Catalogue


Hobson and imperialism [electronic resource] : radicalism, new liberalism, and finance 1887-1938 /
P.J. Cain.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
ix, 320 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
019820390X
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
019820390X
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
general note
Includes bibliographical references (p. [285]-311) and index.
catalogue key
7947220
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-06-01:
British economic theorist John A. Hobson (1858-1940) is remembered today for one book, Imperialism (1902), but he was a prolific leftwing journalist and polemicist for over 40 years. Cain (Sheffield Hallam Univ.), co-author with A.G. Hopkins of their insightful British Imperialism (CH, Nov'93), and with him coiner of the term "gentlemanly capitalism," commemorates the centenary of Hobson's celebrated work with this study of its background, place in Hobson's frequently contradictory body of thought, influence (on Lenin, Keynes, and British and American liberal and social democratic ideologies), and ongoing relevance. A convert by the mid-1890s to radical New Liberalism from earlier Liberal Imperialist views, Hobson claimed that finance capitalists determined and manipulated imperial development, starved domestic industry of funding, and contributed by neglect to working-class unemployment and under-consumption. A mediocre researcher prone to conspiracy theories, hasty judgments, and puzzling reversals, Hobson was also a perceptive cross-disciplinary synthesizer capable of brilliant speculative leaps, including his forecasting of postmodern corporate capitalism and globalization. This book is an important contribution to the extensive scholarship on Hobson. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. M. Cregier University of Prince Edward Island
Reviews
Review Quotes
A book on Hobson and imperialism written by Peter Cain, not only one of today's foremost imperial historians, but also one with a long-standing interest in Hobson's writings, thus promises much. It is a tribute to Cain that this study, the result of years of mature consideration of Hobson's thought, lives up to its promise.
Cain explores Hobson's responses to Cobden, Ruskin and the radical tradition with considerable insight and subtlety.
Cain's study will certainly encourage many historians to re-read Imperialism, and perhaps to dip into Hobson's other writings. For the able undergraduate, the research student and the historian of overseas expansion, Cain's excellent critical analysis and contextualization of Hobson's thinking about empire is required reading.
... excellent book ... we are given what I think is possibly the most balanced overall analysis of the arguments of Imperialism in the context of Hobson's intellectual development.
I can think of no previous study which would be of such value to an undergraduate coming to Hobson for the first time, and specialists in the field will find it both informative and stimulating.
"I strongly recommend that every serious economic historian, any politician interested in the current state of international affairs, and a substantial fraction of interested laymen read this well crafted study of a late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century scholor."--ALBIONR
Peter Cain's account of the complexities and inconsistencies of Hobson's thinking on imperialism is masterly. It is the perceptive outcome of thirty years of study and reflection. It will serve as an authoritative guide to the thought of one of the most curious political economists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, whose writings still retain their ability to provoke us into thinking more deeply about our world.
'... the study illustrates the relevance of Hobson's questions to contemporary scholars of the history of the British Empire.'Political Studies Review
This is a first-rate book by an excellent scholar of British imperialism and of Hobson, which deserves to be studied by students of the history of empire and of the place of liberalism in that history.
This is a first-rate book. Cain has absorbed not only the huge range of Hobson's writings but an even wider range of secondary material. His bibliography alone will be of huge value to students.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text evaluates J.A. Hobson's writings on imperialism, from his days as a journalist in London, to his death in 1940. It charts his progress from complacent imperialist in the 1880s to radical critic by 1898. His work, rich and diverse, continues to be relevant in the 21st century.
Long Description
The year 2002 sees the centenary of J. A. Hobson's Imperialism: A Study, the most influential critique of British imperial expansion ever written. P. J. Cain marks the occasion by evaluating, for the first time, Hobson's writings on imperialism from his days as a journalist in London to his death in 1940. The early chapters chart Hobson's progress from complacent imperialist in the 1880s to radical critic of empire by 1898. This is followed by an account of the origins of Imperialism and a close analysis of the text in the context of contemporary debates. Two chapters cover Hobson's later writings, showing their richness and variety, and analysing his decision to republish Imperialism in 1938. The author discusses the reception of Imperialism and its emergence as a 'classic' by the late 1930s and ends with a detailed discussion of the relevance of the arguments of Imperialism to present-day historians.
Main Description
The year 2002 sees the centenary of J.A. Hobson's Imperialism: A Study, the most influential critique of British imperial expansion ever written. Peter Cain marks the occasion by evaluating, for the first time, Hobson's writings on imperialism from his days as a journalist in London to his death in 1940. The early chapters chart Hobson's progress from complacent imperialist in the 1880s to radical critic of empire by 1898. This is followed by an account of the origins of Imperialism and a close analysis of the text in the context of contemporary debates. Two chapters cover Hobson's later writings, showing their richness and variety, and analysing his decision to republish Imperialism in 1938. The author discusses the reception of Imperialism and its emergence as a 'classic' by the late 1930s and ends with a detailed discussion of the relevance of the arguments of Imperialism to present-day historians.
Main Description
The year 2002 sees the centenary of J. A. Hobson's Imperialism: A Study, the most influential critique of British imperial expansion ever written. P. J. Cain marks the occasion by evaluating, for the first time, Hobson's writings on imperialism from his days as a journalist in London to hisdeath in 1940. The early chapters chart Hobson's progress from complacent imperialist in the 1880s to radical critic of empire by 1898. This is followed by an account of the origins of Imperialism and a close analysis of the text in the context of contemporary debates. Two chapters cover Hobson'slater writings, showing their richness and variety, and analysing his decision to republish Imperialism in 1938. The author discusses the reception of Imperialism and its emergence as a 'classic' by the late 1930s and ends with a detailed discussion of the relevance of the arguments of Imperialismto present-day historians.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Becoming a New Liberal 1887-1898
Becoming an Anti-Imperialist 1887-98
The Economics of Imperialism 1899-1902
Imperialism. A Study: Parasitism and Industry
Dilemmas of a New Liberal: Free Trade, Foreign Investment and Imperialism 1903-1914
Late Variations on a Famous Theme 1914-1938
Hobson Lives? Finance, Finance Capital and British Imperialsm 1870-1914
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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