Catalogue


History of shock waves, explosions and impact [electronic resource] : a chronological and biographical reference /
Peter O. K. Krehl.
imprint
Berlin : Springer, c2009.
description
xxii, 1288 p. : Ill. (some col.), ports. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
3540206787, 9783540206781
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berlin : Springer, c2009.
isbn
3540206787
9783540206781
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7946121
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the reviews:The book written by … Peter O. K. Krehl is a tour de force describing the historic development of explosion and shock wave science. … The book with almost 1300 pages and more than 1500 pictures is an extraordinary compilation of the development of shock wave physics and explosion science over time. Its encyclopaedic style allows for easy access, both for scientists or for students … . I found myself unable to stop reading once I started. The book is essential for public libraries. (Rolf Prümmer, Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, Vol. 34 (5), October, 2010)
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This unique and encyclopedic reference work charts the evolution of the physics of shock waves and detonations from the earliest investigations into percussion and impact phenomena right up to the most recent groundbreaking research in the field. The history of this long and complex process is first reviewed in a general survey that encompasses everything from the earliest observations and interpretations of puzzling high-rate dynamic phenomena associated with natural and man-made explosions to a discussion of the merits of modern numerical computer simulations.The subject is then treated in more detail and in chronological order in the central section of the book, while also being richly illustrated in form of a picture gallery. The bibliographic index provides 122 short biographies of eminent researchers who have contributed to the field. Further references for biographical sources are given, and both name and subject indices (with over 4500 and 2700 entries, respectively) are provided."This book is of tremendous value to all who teach, research or write about the subject or, simply, are inquisitive about the people whose names appear in the text or bibliographies. The whole community is indebted to Peter Krehl for what has clearly been a labour of love and for what must surely become the "bible" of shock waves, explosives and impact" Professor John E. Field, FRS, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge.
Main Description
This unique and encyclopedic reference work charts the evolution of the physics of shock waves and detonations from the earliest investigations into percussion and impact phenomena right up to the most recent groundbreaking research in the field. The history of this long and complex process is first reviewed in a general survey that encompasses everything from the earliest observations and interpretations of puzzling high-rate dynamic phenomena associated with natural and man-made explosions to a discussion of the merits of modern numerical computer simulations. The subject is then treated in more detail and in chronological order in the central section of the book, while also being richly illustrated in form of a picture gallery. The bibliographic index provides 122 short biographies of eminent researchers who have contributed to the field. Further references for biographical sources are given, and both name and subject indices (with over 4500 and 2700 entries, respectively) are provided."This book is of tremendous value to all who teach, research or write about the subject or, simply, are inquisitive about the people whose names appear in the text or bibliographies. The whole community is indebted to Peter Krehl for what has clearly been a labour of love and for what must surely become the "bible" of shock waves, explosives and impact" Professor John E. Field, FRS, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge.
Main Description
This unique and encyclopedic reference work describes the evolution of the physics of modern shock wave and detonation from the earlier and classical percussion. The history of this complex process is first reviewed in a general survey. Subsequently, the subject is treated in more detail and the book is richly illustrated in the form of a picture gallery. This book is ideal for everyone professionally interested in shock wave phenomena.
Back Cover Copy
This unique and encyclopedic reference work charts the evolution of the physics of shock waves and detonations from the earliest investigations into percussion and impact phenomena right up to the most recent groundbreaking research in the field. The history of this long and complex process is first reviewed in a general survey that encompasses everything from the earliest observations and interpretations of puzzling high-rate dynamic phenomena associated with natural and man-made explosions to a discussion of the merits of modern numerical computer simulations. The subject is then treated in more detail and in chronological order in the central section of the book, while also being richly illustrated in form of a picture gallery. The bibliographic index provides 122 short biographies of eminent researchers who have contributed to the field. Further references for biographical sources are given, and both name and subject indices (with over 4500 and 2700 entries, respectively) are provided. "This book is of tremendous value to all who teach, research or write about the subject or, simply, are inquisitive about the people whose names appear in the text or bibliographies. The whole community is indebted to Peter Krehl for what has clearly been a labour of love and for what must surely become the "bible" of shock waves, explosives and impact" Professor John E. Field, FRS, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Describing the evolution of the physics of modern shock wave and detonation from the earlier and classical percussion, this book encompasses the earliest observations and interpretations of puzzling high-rate dynamic phenomena of natural and man-made explosions to the discussion of the merits of numerical computer simulations.
Main Description
This unique and encyclopedic reference work charts the evolution of the physics of shock waves and detonations from the earliest investigations into percussion right up to the most recent groundbreakind research in the field. The history of this long and complex process is first reviewed in a general survey that encompasses everything from the earliest observations and interpretations of puzzling high-rate dynamic phenomena associated with natural and man-made explosions to a discussion of the merits of modern numerical computer simulations. The subject is then treated in more detail and in chronological order in the central section of the book, while also being richly illustrated in form of a picture gallery. The bibliographic index provides 122 short biographies of eminent researchers who have contributed to the field. Further references for biographical sources are given, and both name and subject indices (with over 4400 and 2500 entries, respectively) are provided. "This book is of tremendous value to all who teach, research or write about the subject or, simply, are inquisitive about the people whose names appear in the text or bibliographies. The whole community is indebted to Peter Krehl for what has clearly been a labour of love and for what must surely become the "bible" of shock waves, explosives and impact" Professor John E. Field, FRS, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
General Surveyp. 9
Terminology and Scopep. 11
Percussion, Concussion, Impact, and Collisionp. 12
Explosion and Implosionp. 18
Conflagration, Deflagration, Detonation, and Detonicsp. 22
Hydraulic Jump, Bore, Surge, Tsunami, Seiche, Sea Shock, and Rogue Wavep. 25
Shock and Shock Wavep. 28
Collisionless Shock Wavesp. 33
Shock and Vibrationp. 34
Blast Wave, Blast, and Blastingp. 34
Gas Dynamics, Rarefied Gas Dynamics, Magnetogasdynamics, and Cosmical Gas Dynamicsp. 36
Initiation of Percussion Researchp. 38
Natura Non Facit Salamip. 38
Foundation of Dynamicsp. 41
Classical Percussion Research
Center of Percussion
Vis Viva Controversy
Corpuscular Models
Newtonian Demonstrator
Further Investigationsp. 46
Hertzian Cone
Bulb of Percussion
Conchoidal Fracture
Percussion Figures
Percussion Marks
Percussion Force and Contact Time
Billiards
Ballistic Pendulum
Applications of Percussionp. 49
Driving, Steam Hammer
Percussion Drilling
Crushing, Fragmentation
Fluid Jet Impact
Firearms
Intense Sound Generation
Medical Diagnostics
Biomechanics
Early Speculations On Supersonic Phenomenap. 52
Observations in Nature: Stimulating Riddlesp. 54
Thunder
Hydrometeors
Bores
Tsunamis
Surges
Earthquakes and Seaquakes
Explosive Volcanic Eruptions
Meteorite Impact
Cosmic Shock Wave Phenomena
Cosmic Explosion Phenomena
Cosmogony
Early Man-Made Shock Generators: Tools and Toysp. 69
Clapping of Hands
Whip-Cracking
Snapping Belts and Snapping Towel
Electric Sparks
Musical Instruments
Ballistic Studies: Birth of Supersonicsp. 71
Evolution Of Shock Wave Physicsp. 72
Nonlinear Acousticsp. 72
Main Periods of Evolutionp. 73
From 1746 to 1808
From 1808 to 1869
From 1822 to 1893
From 1888 top. 1930
From 1930 to 1939
From 1939 to 1949
From 1950 to the Present
Documentation and Dissemination
Aerial Waves of Finite Amplitude: a Challenge for Mathematiciansp. 76
Water Waves
Approach to Shock Waves
Motivations
Superposition of Shock Waves
Shock Waves in Gases: First Experimental Proofs of Their Existencep. 80
The Roots of Gas Dynamics
First Studies of Intense Air Waves
Mach Reflection
First Laboratory-Scale Supersonic Experiments
Studies of Nozzle Outflow
Wind Tunnels
Shock Tubes
Shock Waves in a Liquid: the Peculiar Fluidp. 86
Shock-Induced Freezing
Liquefaction
Water Hammer, Water Ram, Hydraulic Ram and Hydrodynamic Ram
Underwater Explosions
Water Ricochets
Cavitation
Supercavitation
Photodisruptive Effect
Sonoluminescence
Electrohydraulic Effect
Solid-State Shock Wave Physics: Initiation by Nuclear Weaponeersp. 93
Roots
Establishment and Motivations
Materials Dynamics
Dynamic Fracture
Equations of State
Off-Hugoniot States
Stimulation of Secondary Effects
Piercing The Sound Barrier: Myth And Realityp. 100
Unmanned Vehicles: First Demonstrations of Practicabilityp. 101
Manned Vehicles: from Venture to Routinep. 103
New Challenges, New Threatsp. 104
Evolution Of Detonation Physicsp. 105
Black Powder: the Maid of All Workp. 106
The Riddle of Detonation: Steps Toward an Understandingp. 108
High Explosives
Firing Devices
Firedamp Explosions
Coal Dust Explosions
Detonation Wave
Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) Theory
Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Döing (ZND) Theory
Complex Detonation Processes
Evolution of Chemical Kinetics
Detonics: the Key to Ultrahigh Shock Pressures, and New Applicationsp. 114
Nuclear and Thermonuclear Explosions: the Ultimate Man-Made Shock Phenomenap. 115
Milestones in Nuclear Physics
The First Types of Nuclear Bomb
U.S. Plowshare Program
Soviet Plowshare Program
New Generations of Nuclear Weapons
`Dirty Bomb' Explosion
Evolution Of Seismologyp. 119
Explosion Seismology & Vibroseisp. 119
Seismoscopes, Seismographs, and Seismometersp. 120
Seismic Prospecting and Researchp. 121
High-Speed Diagnosticsp. 122
Precise Time Measurement: the Crucial Conditionp. 123
Chronoscopes and Chronographs
Electronic Timing Devices
Triggering
Prerigger Framing Photography
Optical Methods of Visualization: the Key to a Better Understandingp. 127
Schlieren Methods
Shadowgraphy
Interferometry
Other Methods
The Soot Technique: Ingenious `Black Magic'p. 130
High-Speed Photography and Photonics: Freezing the Instantp. 130
Single-Shot Photography
High-Speed Cinematography
Flash X-Ray Techniques: Visualizing the Hiddenp. 132
Flash Radiography
Flash X-Ray Diffraction Analysis
The Correct Measurement of Shock Pressure: an Evergreen Problemp. 133
Mechanical Gauges
Piezoelectric Gauges
Piezoresistive Gauges
Examples of Other Methods
Evolution Of Computational Analysisp. 137
The Pre-Computer Era: Triumph of Mechanical and Graphical Methodsp. 138
Digital Mechanical Machines
Analog Mechanical Machines
Graphical Concepts
Revolution in Calculation: the Automatic Digital Computerp. 141
Digital Electromechanical Computers
Digital Electronic Computers
The Tricky Problem: Treating Flow Discontinuities Numericallyp. 144
Concluding Remarksp. 146
Chronologyp. 169
Natural Shock, Explosion & Impact Phenomena: Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Chronology:
Prehistoric Times
Antiquity
Middle Ages
Modern Times
Picture Galleryp. 845
Shock And Percussion In Naturep. 847
Lunar Surface, a Result of Meteorite Impacts
Meteor Crater and Shock Metamorphism
Asteroid Impact: Ries Basin and Steinheim Basin
Two Famous Meteorites: Ensisheim and Murchison
Great Earthquakes: Lisbon (1755)
Great Earthquakes: San Francisco (1906)
Explosive Volcanic Eruption: Krakatau (1883)
Explosive Volcanic Eruption: Mount St. Helens (1980)
Plate Tectonics
Lightning and Thunder
The Riddle of Ball Lightning
Tidal Bores
Hydraulic Jumps
Tsunami Caused by Submarine Volcanic Eruption
Tsunami Caused by Subduction
Examples of Early Tsunami Research
The Tsunami in Indian Mythology
Destructive Tsunami Effects
Rogue or Freak Waves
Sunspots, Solar Flares, and Prominences
Solar Flares and Solar Quakes
Big Bang Portrait
Earth's Bow Shock
Cosmic Jets, Shock Waves, and Mach Cones
Animal World
Percussion In The Evolution Of Technologyp. 876
Basic Tool of Civilization
Early War Machines
Devices Based on Rapid Expansion
Devices Based on Rapid Compression
Periodically Operating Devices
Pile Driver
Forge Steam Ram and Explosion Ram
Explosion Tamper and Wrecking Ball
Percussion Boring
Ricocheting
Big Guns of the 19th Century
Superguns of the 20th Century
PERCUSSION STUDIESp. 888
17th Century: The Pioneering Era of Percussion Research
18th Century: Percussion Machine for Demonstrating Central Percussion
18th Century: Percussion Machine for Demonstrating Oblique Percussion
18th Century: First Ballistic Pendulum
19th Century: Measurement of Shock Duration
19th Century: Coriolis' Mathematical Studies on Billiards
Oldest Known Seismoscope and 19th-Century Seismography
19th Century: Percussion Figures
20th Century: Measurement of Deformation and Force
20th Century: Pressure-Bar Devices
20th Century: Taylor Test
20th Century: Examples of Ball Percussion Studies
20th Century: Liquids under Impact
20th Century: Sweet Spots of Sports Equipment
20th Century: Seismology of Nuclear Explosions
Percussion And Shock Wave Modelsp. 906
Corpuscular Models and Newton's `Cradle'
Shock Wave Demonstration Apparatus
One-Dimensional Shock Wave Models
Apparatus for Demonstrating Hydraulic Jumps
Traffic Shocks
Amusing Cartoons
Shock Wave Visualizationp. 910
Toepler's Stroboscopy of Propagating Shock Waves
Antolik's Soot Method
Examples of Shock Wave Photography in Gases
Shock Tube Studies
Whip Cracking
Muzzle Blast and Head Wave
Color Schlieren Photography
Head Wave Studiesp. 918
Huygens' Principle of Wave-Front Construction
Doppler, Father of the Head Wave Phenomenon
Surface Wave Pattern Produced by a Moving Body in Water
Mach and Salcher: Prelude to a Pioneering Ballistic Experiment
First Experimental Evidence
Other Optical Methods
Model Sonic Boom Studies
Pressure Measurements Around a Flying Projectile
Blunt Body Concept
Phenomena at Hypersonic Velocities
Nozzle Studies And Applicationsp. 926
Early Safety Valve Constructions
Predecessors of Steam Turbines
Forerunners of the Laval Nozzle
Use of the Venturi Nozzle in the First Wind Tunnel
First Use of Laval Nozzle in a Steam Turbine
Steam Flow in a Divergent Nozzle
Laval Nozzles as Power Generators in Aeronautics
Supersonic Jet Phenomenap. 931
Salcher and Mach's First Free Air Jet Studies
Emden's First Steam Jet Studies
Prandtl and Meyer's Nozzle and Jet Studies
Thomer's First Radiographs of Detonating Shaped Charges
Formation and Structure of Liquid Jets
Generation of Microjets
Astrophysical Jets
Wind Tunnelsp. 938
Pioneering Supersonic Devices in France and England
Prewar Supersonic Facility at TH Aachen
Continuous-Flow Closed-Circuit Supersonic Facility at ETH Zurich
Supersonic Intermittent Indraft Facility at the German Rocket Center, Peenemünde
Slotted Throat of Supersonic Facility at NACA, Hampton, VA
Ludwieg Tube Facility at AVA, Göttingen
First Hypervelocity Facilities
Shock Tubesp. 944
Vieille's Pioneering Setup
Bleakney's Triggerable Shock Tube
Special Types
Shock Wave Generationp. 950
Snapping Belts and Whip Cracking
Plane-Wave Generators
Gun-Type High-Velocity Accelerators
Other Methods
Laser-Induced Spark
Laser-Supported Detonation (LSD)
Laser-Propelled `Lightcraft'
SHOCK FRONT ANALYSISp. 954
In Gaseous Matter
In Space
In Solid Matter
Hydraulic Jumps in Water
Mach Effectp. 958
Interactions of Hydrodynamic Jumps
Shock Interactions in Gases
Shock Interactions in Liquids
Shock interactions in Solids
Shock Wave Effectsp. 966
Shock-Induced Creation of Prebiotic Substances
Cavitation
Supercavitation
Condensation
Aerodynamic Shock Heating
A-Shock Configuration
Shock Focusing
Transonic Shock Phenomena
Aerodynamic Drag
Whitcomb's Area Rule
Pseudo Supersonic Wave Effects
Gasdynamic Laser
Shock-On-Shock Problem
Shock Wave Interactions in Metals
Shock-Induced Solidification
Other Phenomena
Shock Wave Applicationsp. 978
Miscellaneous
Determination of Seismic Wave Velocities
Explosion Seismology: the Mintrop Wave
Medical Therapy
Materials Research and Metal Working Industry
Oil Production Industry
Explosion, Implosion, and Detonationp. 984
Early Use of Black Powder
Hollow Charge Effect
Underwater Explosions
Implosion and Explosion in a Gas
Nuclear Implosion Device: The `Gadget'
Examples of Nuclear Explosions
Electric Guns
Exploding Wires
Large Yield Surface Detonations
Precursor Detonation Phenomenon
One-Dimensional Detonation Front Models
Spinning Detonation
Periodic Cell Structure
Other Explosion Phenomena
Explosive Ablation of Biological Tissue
Explosion and Detonation Diagnosticsp. 998
Maximum Pressure of Fired Gunpowder
Maximum Pressure and Temperature
Chamber Pressure of a Detonating Explosive
Brisance Test of Gunpowder
Brisance Test of a High Explosive
Test of Explosives Used in Mining
Dust Explosion Tester
Detonation Velocity of a High Explosive
Detonation Velocity of a Gaseous Explosion
Interior Ballistic Studies
Blast Wave Recording
Streak Photography in Detonics
Reflected-Light Photography in Detonics
Optical Methods for Flow Visualizingp. 1008
Schlieren Photography
Shadowgraphy
Interferometry
Holography
Surface Thermography
High-Speed Diagnosticsp. 1012
Chronoscopes and Chronographs
Cathode-Ray Oscilloscopes
Time-Delay Generators
Triggered Snapshot Photography
Rotating Mirror
Spark Chronography of a Flying Projectile
Rotating Mirror Streak Cameras
High-Speed Cinematography
High-Speed Vehiclesp. 1020
Mythologies
First Supersonic Rocket Flight
First Hypersonic Rocket Flight
First Transonic Rocket Plane
First Supersonic Rocket Plane
Supersonic Propeller
Supersonic Transport (SST)
Hypersonic Aircraft
Manned Spacecraft: Reentry Capsules
Manned Spacecraft: Shuttles
Rocket Sleds
Supersonic Car
Man-Made Disastersp. 1028
Steam-Boiler Explosions
Firedamp Explosions
Gun Barrel Bursts
Grain Dust Explosions
Nuclear Reactor Explosion
World Trade Center: Terrorist Bomb Attack
World Trade Center: Terrorist Aircraft Attack
Biographies Indexp. 1035
F.A. Abel
J. Ackeret
G.B. Airy
L. V. Al'tshuler
K. Antolik
R.A. Becker
D. Bernoulli
P.E.M. Berthelot
H.A. Bethe
W. Bleakney
C.V. Boys
P.W. Bridgman
R.W.E. Bunsen
A. Busemann
L. Carré
H. Cavendish
J. Challis
D.L. Chapman
G.G. de Coriolis
R. Courant
C.J. Cranz
L.M. Crocco
H. Davy
H.B. Dixon
C.A. Doppler
W.S. Döring
H.L. Dryden
P.M.M. Duhem
G.E. Duvall
S. Earnshaw
L. Euler
A. Ferri
A.A. Friedmann
K.O. Friedrichs
Y.A. Gagarin
G.A. Gamow
I.I. Glass
H. Glauert
V. Goldberg
J.S. Hadamard
C. Haeussermann
R. Hermann
H.R. Hertz
A. Hertzberg
B. Hopkinson
E.P. Hubble
P.H. Hugoniot
C. Hutton
C. Huygens
W. Johnson
J.C.E. Jouguet
I. Kant
T. von Kármán
G.B. Kistiakowsky
K. Kobes
H. Lamb
O. Laporte
C.G.P. de Laval
P.E. Le Boulengé
H.L. Le Chatelier
H.J.E. Lemaitre
N. Lémery
M.J. Lighthill
E.W.J.W. Mach
L. Mach
N.V. Maiyevskii
F.E. Mallard
R. Mallet
J.M. Marci von Kronland
E. Mariotte
L.H.F. Melsens
M. Mersenne
V.A. Mikhel 'son
L. Mintrop
C.E. Munroe
J.L. von Neumann
A.B. Nobel
A. Noble
A.K. Oppenheim
K. Oswatitsch
D. Papin
W.H. Payman
S.D. Poisson
T.C. Poulter
L. Prandtl
W.J.M. Rankine
Lord Rayleigh
J.W. Strutt
H.V. Regnault
G.F.B. Riemann
B. Robins
T.J. Rodman
J.S. Russell
A.J.C. de Saint-Venant
P. Salcher
R.J. Schall
H. Schardin
O. von Schmidt
P. Schmidt
F.C. Schultz-Grunow
L.I. Sedov
N.N. Semenov
E.M. Shoemaker
R.I. Soloukhin
T.E. Stanton
K.P. Stanyukovich
A.B. Stodola
G.G. Stokes
J.W. Strutt
B. Sturtevant
P.G. Tait
A.H. Taub
G.I. Taylor
A.J.I. Toepler
M.A. Toepler
A.N. Tupolev
P.M.E. Vieille
J. Wallis
H.M. Weber
C. Wieselsberger
R.W. Wood
C. Wren
C.E. Yeager
Y.B. Zel'dovich
G.V. Zemplén
N.E. Zhukovsky
Supplementary Referencesp. 1201
General Encyclopediasp. 1203
Special Encyclopedias, Dictionaries & Glossariesp. 1203
Handbooksp. 1205
Biographical Catalogues, Dictionaries, Encyclopedias & Periodicalsp. 1205
Bibliographical Cataloguesp. 1207
Books & Review Articles With Historical Perspectivep. 1207
Acoustics & Nonlinear Acoustics
Aerodynamics, Aeronautics & Astronautics
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Ballistics
Bores, Hydraulic Jumps, Solitary Waves & Tsunamis
Chemistry
Collision, Percussion & Impact
Combustion Research
Computer, Early Developments & Applications
Diagnostics, High-Speed Photography & Scientific Instruments
Earthquakes & Seaquakes
Explosions & Detonations
Fluid Dynamics & Gas Dynamics
General Reviews
Geology & Geophysics
Hydraulics & Hydrodynamics
Mathematics
Mechanics
Mining Industry
Nuclear Weapons Development
Physics
Seismology & Geophysical Prospecting
Shock Waves & Blast Waves
Shock Waves in Biology & Medicine
Steam Boiler Explosions
Thermodynamics
Thunder
Volcanoes
Internet Homepagesp. 1214
Research Institutions
Technical Museums
Name Indexp. 1217
Subject Indexp. 1257
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem