Catalogue


Hegemony to empire [electronic resource] : the development of the Roman Imperium in the East from 148 to 62 B.C. /
Robert Morstein Kallet-Marx.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
description
xiv, 428 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520080750 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c1995.
isbn
0520080750 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7941629
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 369-390) and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Of deep interest to anyone concerned with ideas of empire and the exercise of power."--F.W. Walbank, Cambridge University
Summaries
Main Description
In one of the most important contributions to the study of Roman imperialism to appear in recent years, Robert Kallet-Marx argues for a less simplistic, more fluid understanding of the evolution of Roman power in the Balkans, Greece, and Asia Minor. He distinguishes between hegemony--the ability of the Romans to command obedience on the basis of a real or implied military threat--and the later phenomenon of empire, demonstrating that Roman imperium was not the result of the sudden imposition of geographically defined provinces or permanent armies. Rather, the integration of the Greek world into a Roman imperial system was a complex process of evolution requiring mutual adaptation by both Romans and Greeks.
Long Description
In one of the most important contributions to the study of Roman imperialism to appear in recent years, Robert Kallet-Marx argues for a less simplistic, more fluid understanding of the evolution of Roman power in the Balkans, Greece, and Asia Minor. He distinguishes between hegemony--the ability of the Romans to command obedience on the basis of a real or implied military threat--and the later phenomenon of empire, demonstrating that Romanimperiumwas not the result of the sudden imposition of geographically defined provinces or permanent armies. Rather, the integration of the Greek world into a Roman imperial system was a complex process of evolution requiring mutual adaptation by both Romans and Greeks.
Table of Contents
Abbreviations
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Macedonia Provinciap. 11
The Status of Greece after the Achaean Warp. 42
Mummius's Settlement of Greecep. 57
The Origins of Asia Provinciap. 97
Proconsular Administration in the East, 148-89p. 125
Roman Arbitration of Greek Disputes after 148p. 161
Treaties of Alliancep. 184
Rome and Athens from the Achaean War to Sullap. 198
Rome and the East between Aristonicus and Mithridates: The Eventsp. 223
Sulla's Settlement of the Eastp. 261
From Sulla to Pompeyp. 291
Conclusionp. 335
Appendicesp. 343
Bibliographyp. 369
Index of Names and Subjectsp. 391
Index of Sourcesp. 405
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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