Catalogue

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The Grimké sisters from South Carolina [electronic resource] : pioneers for woman's [sic] rights and abolition /
Gerda Lerner.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
description
xix, 364 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0195106032 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
isbn
0195106032 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
7936592
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-341) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gerda Lerner, Robinson-Edwards Professor of History, Emerita, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, is also a past president of the Organization of American Historians and a founding member of the National Organization for Women (NOW), as well as one of the creators of Women's History Month
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A conscientious and well-researched biography."--Choice
"[A]dmirably researched and flawlessly told....Mrs. Lerner has written a book she can be proud of."--Washington Star "Gerda Lerners book shows the unusual combination of warmth and historical scholarship that we all look for and don't often find."--Robert Coles "It is good to know that at last the story of two of the most remarkable women in American history is fully and sensitively told."--Carl Degler
"[A]dmirably researched and flawlessly told....Mrs. Lerner has written a book she can be proud of."-- Washington Star "Gerda Lerners book shows the unusual combination of warmth and historical scholarship that we all look for and don't often find."--Robert Coles "It is good to know that at last the story of two of the most remarkable women in American history is fully and sensitively told."--Carl Degler
"It is good to know that at last the story of two of the most remarkable women in American history is fully and sensitively told."--Carl Degler
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The only Southern white women ever to become leading abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimke encountered many obstacles and leapt many hurdles in pursuing their anti-slavery work. Their greatest accomplishment was overcoming the ubiquitous prejudices of society in regard to women. Indeed, they were the first women to take to the public platform and the first to assert women's rights. In The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, Gerda Lerner, herself a leading historian and pioneer in women's studies, tells the compelling history of these determined sisters and the inroads they made for women and blacks alike. From their wealthy upbringing in Charleston, South Carolina, the societal restraints that kept them from higher education, and their utter contempt of slavery, to their conversion to the Quaker religion, and monumental achievements at the podium and with the pen, Lerner illuminates the lasting contributions of the Grimke sisters, as well as the important role played by women in the anti-slavery movement.
Long Description
The only Southern white women ever to become leading abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimki encountered many obstacles and leapt many hurdles in pursuing their anti-slavery work. Their greatest accomplishment was overcoming the ubiquitous prejudices of society in regard to women. Indeed, they were the first women to take to the public platform and the first to assert women's rights. In The Grimki Sisters from South Carolina, Gerda Lerner, herself a leading historian and pioneer in women's studies, tells the compelling history of these determined sisters and the inroads they made for women and blacks alike. From their wealthy upbringing in Charleston, South Carolina, the societal restraints that kept them from higher education, and their utter contempt of slavery, to their conversion to the Quaker religion, and monumental achievements at the podium and with the pen, Lerner illuminates the lasting contributions of the Grimki sisters, as well as the important role played by women in the anti-slavery movement.
Main Description
The only Southern white women ever to become leading abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimke encountered many obstacles and leapt many hurdles in pursuing their anti-slavery work. Their greatest accomplishment was overcoming the ubiquitous prejudices of society in regard to women. Indeed,they were the first women to take to the public platform and the first to assert women's rights. In The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina, Gerda Lerner, herself a leading historian and pioneer in women's studies, tells the compelling history of these determined sisters and the inroads they made forwomen and blacks alike. From their wealthy upbringing in Charleston, South Carolina, the societal restraints that kept them from higher education, and their utter contempt of slavery, to their conversion to the Quaker religion, and monumental achievements at the podium and with the pen, Lernerilluminates the lasting contributions of the Grimke sisters, as well as the important role played by women in the anti-slavery movement.
Main Description
The only Southern white women ever to become leading abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimk encountered many obstacles and leapt many hurdles in pursuing their anti-slavery work. Their greatest accomplishment was overcoming the ubiquitous prejudices of society in regard to women. Indeed, they were the first women to take to the public platform and the first to assert women's rights. InThe Grimk Sisters from South Carolina, Gerda Lerner, herself a leading historian and pioneer in women's studies, tells the compelling history of these determined sisters and the inroads they made for women and blacks alike. From their wealthy upbringing in Charleston, South Carolina, the societal restraints that kept them from higher education, and their utter contempt of slavery, to their conversion to the Quaker religion, and monumental achievements at the podium and with the pen, Lerner illuminates the lasting contributions of the Grimk sisters, as well as the important role played by women in the anti-slavery movement.
Main Description
The only Southern white women ever to become leading abolitionists, Sarah and Angelina Grimké encountered many obstacles and leapt many hurdles in pursuing their anti-slavery work. Their greatest accomplishment was overcoming the ubiquitous prejudices of society in regard to women. Indeed, they were the first women to take to the public platform and the first to assert women's rights. In The Grimké Sisters from South Carolina , Gerda Lerner, herself a leading historian and pioneer in women's studies, tells the compelling history of these determined sisters and the inroads they made for women and blacks alike. From their wealthy upbringing in Charleston, South Carolina, the societal restraints that kept them from higher education, and their utter contempt of slavery, to their conversion to the Quaker religion, and monumental achievements at the podium and with the pen, Lerner illuminates the lasting contributions of the Grimké sisters, as well as the important role played by women in the anti-slavery movement.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
The Grimke Sisters from South Carolinap. 1
Printed Speeches of Angelina Grimke Weldp. 275
Notesp. 293
Bibliographyp. 325
Indexp. 343
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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